Subscribe to Our Feeds

Current Postings RSS

Announcements RSS

Home :: Archive :: 2012 :: April ::
Shakespeare and Emotions at Anzsa

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 23.177  Friday, 27 April 2012

 

[1] From:        Paul Barry < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

     Date:         April 13, 2012 6:02:37 PM EDT

     Subject:      Re: SHAKSPER: Emo Anzsa

 

[2] From:        Chris Whatmore < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

     Date:         April 14, 2012 7:04:29 AM EDT

     Subject:      Re: SHAKSPER: Emo Anzsa

 

[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------

From:        Paul Barry < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         April 13, 2012 6:02:37 PM EDT

Subject:      Re: SHAKSPER: Emo Anzsa

 

>SHAKESPEARE AND EMOTIONS

>

>The 11th Biennial International Conference of the Australian 

>and New Zealand Shakespeare Association in collaboration 

>with the ARC Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions

 

[ . . . ]

 

>The study of emotions in history, literature, and other aspects of 

>culture is a burgeoning field, and Shakespeare takes a very central 

>and influential place. The conveners invite papers on any aspect of 

>the ways in which Shakespeare and/or his contemporaries 

>represented emotions in poetry, drama, and other works, 

>and/or how these representations have been received by 

>audiences and readers from the sixteenth century to the 

>present day.

>

>There are paradoxes to be explored—how ‘the bodily turn’ 

>of physiological influence on emotions could in turn generate 

>more modern models of inner consciousness alone; how 

>concepts rooted historically in Elizabethan and Jacobean 

>England could be adapted to fit the philosophies and 

>concepts of later ages, through eighteenth-century literature 

>of sensibility, nineteenth-century and Darwinian approaches, 

>twentieth-century psychologism stimulated by Freud, and a 

>host of others. Did Shakespeare tap into a ‘collective 

>unconscious’ of ‘universal’ stories, or did he arbitrarily choose 

>stories to dramatise which his affective eloquence incorporated 

>into world literature? Why have his works proved so durable in 

>their emotional power, both in themselves and adaptations into 

>other media such as opera, music, film and dance? Equal 

>attention is invited to plays in performance and in ‘closet’ 

>critical readings, as well as textual studies and adaptations.

>The New Fortune Theatre, built in 1964 to the exact dimensions of 

>The Fortune playhouse that rivaled Shakespeare’s Globe in 

>seventeenth-century London, will be available for original 

>practice performances, open rehearsals, and stage-based 

>research papers, etc.

 

[ . . . ]

 

If you want to make a little sense out of the language problem in HV in production, try this:

 

Exploit the various dialects of the English speakers, AND when the French talk to each other, have them speak French.  When they speak to the Brits, they speak English with a slight French accent. No Brit speaks French except for Henry in his wooing scene and the Boy in that silly scene with Pistol and the French soldier.

 

Some of your audience will bitch, but most of them will know what’s going on.

 

Paul Barry

 

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------

From:        Chris Whatmore < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         April 14, 2012 7:04:29 AM EDT

Subject:      Re: SHAKSPER: Emo Anzsa

 

The 11th Biennial International Conference of the Australian and New Zealand Shakespeare Association in collaboration with the ARC Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions

 

Wow.

 

Other Messages In This Thread

©2011 Hardy Cook. All rights reserved.