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Home :: Archive :: 2013 :: January ::
Size of Touring Troupe in Gdansk, 1654

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 24.0027  Sunday, 27 January 2013

 

[1] From:        Paul Barry < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

     Date:         January 18, 2013 4:54:42 PM EST

     Subject:     Re: SHAKSPER: Touring Troupe Size 

 

[2] From:        JD Markel < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

     Date:         January 18, 2013 9:54:01 PM EST

     Subject:     Re: SHAKSPER: Touring Troupe Size 

 

 

[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------

From:        Paul Barry < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         January 18, 2013 4:54:42 PM EST

Subject:     Re: SHAKSPER: Touring Troupe Size

 

I’ve never played Gdansk, but the best production of AS YOU LIKE IT I ever saw was Robin Phillips’ Stratford production which was performed by 16 actors.

 

The second best production was the one that ACTER toured in the 1980s

with five actors, three men and two women. They were dynamite, but you had to know the play or the doubling was confusing.

 

Paul Barry 

 

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------

From:        JD Markel < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         January 18, 2013 9:54:01 PM EST

Subject:     Re: SHAKSPER: Touring Troupe Size

 

“a troupe’s 1654 petition for permission to play in the purpose-built playhouse designed to accommodate touring English actors, a building known as the Gdansk Fencing School.”

 

I found it curious that a “purpose built” structure would be called the “Gdansk Fencing School” because my first thought would be that a fencing school could be a good place for performances. I recently (yesterday) attended a very interesting lecture about Baroque dance which dealt in part with the close interrelationship of Baroque dance and fencing. In schools, using French and Spanish examples, the fencing teacher was always also the dance instructor. Baroque dance is quite performative and it could be set up for observers. I can imagine that a “fencing school” might have spaces for performance of fencing and dancing. But this is really out of my league, I just went to the lecture to kill time before a basketball game. But it seemed to me the dance savvy audience was generally previously unaware of the dancing-fencing connection. 

 
 

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