2013

Book Announcements: Shakespeare’s Sense of Character-On the Page and From the Stage

 The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 24.0020  Friday, 18 January 2013

 

From:        Eleazer Durfee <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         January 17, 2013 3:02:04 PM EST

Subject:     Shakespeare’s Sense of Character-On the Page and From the Stage

 

Dear Editor,

 

We have recently published a book which may be of interest to your readers-

 

Shakespeare’s Sense of Character-On the Page and From the Stage

Edited by Yu Jin Ko, Wellesley College, USA and Michael W. Shurgot, South Puget Sound Community College

Series: Studies in Performance and Early Modern Drama

ISBN: 978-1-4094-4066-6

Published December 2012

 

Making a unique intervention in an incipient but powerful resurgence of academic interest in character-based approaches to Shakespeare, this book brings scholars and theatre practitioners together to rethink why and how character continues to matter. Contributors seek in particular to expand our notions of what Shakespearean character is, and to extend the range of critical vocabularies in which character criticism can work. The return to character thus involves incorporating as well as contesting postmodern ideas that have radically revised our conceptions of subjectivity and selfhood.  At the same time, by engaging theatre practitioners, this book promotes the kind of comprehensive dialogue that is necessary for the common endeavor of sustaining the vitality of Shakespeare’s characters.

 

Full details and page extracts are available at www.ashgate.com/isbn/9781409440666

 

Eleazer D. Durfee 

Ashgate/Lund Humphries Publishing Company

www.ashgate.com

www.lundhumphries.com

Pale Fire

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 24.0019  Thursday, 17 January 2013

 

[1] From:        Larry Weiss <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

     Date:         January 17, 2013 12:14:55 AM EST

     Subject:     Re: SHAKSPER: Pale Fire 

 

[2] From:        Bruce Young <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

     Date:         January 17, 2013 9:08:09 AM EST

     Subject:     RE: SHAKSPER: Pale Fire 

 

[3] From:        David Bishop <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

     Date:         January 17, 2013 12:55:48 PM EST

     Subject:     Re: SHAKSPER: Pale Fire 

 

 

[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------

From:        Larry Weiss <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         January 17, 2013 12:14:55 AM EST

Subject:     Re: SHAKSPER: Pale Fire

 

>Oh dear. I had thought Charles Weinstein had gone into hiding, but 

>here he is again, again pissing on Simon Russell Beale. Has he ever 

>liked anything? He has, of course, a perfect right to dislike things, but 

>it’s unfortunate that he needs to dislike so intensely anything that 

>moves away from his conception of the boundaries of the text. I hope 

>this doesn’t herald a new silly season.

 

If Charles’s well-written review is even half accurate, this is a production most of us would dislike.

 

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------

From:        Bruce Young <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         January 17, 2013 9:08:09 AM EST

Subject:     RE: SHAKSPER: Pale Fire

 

Not having seen this production of Timon, I’d be interested to read a detailed response to the actual content of Weinstein’s review. Whether or not it’s fair, the review certainly gives a vivid impression of the production and argues a case at some length that could be argued against—or for—with similar care.

 

Bruce Young

 

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------

From:        David Bishop <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         January 17, 2013 12:55:48 PM EST

Subject:     Re: SHAKSPER: Pale Fire

 

Peter Hyland objects to Charles Weinstein’s negativity, on the apparent ground that it is motivated by a dislike of anything that violates his personal—crankish—idea of “the boundaries of the text”. The usual academic these days is supposed to take a more unbounded—tolerant, pluralistic—view. Responding to Weinstein’s arguments is thus rendered unnecessary.

 

I take it that this sort of standard response is one reason we see Weinstein’s work so seldom these days. For me it’s a breath of fresh air in an increasingly stuffy room. Here’s an example of the kind of prose more often encountered in professional quarters, and on this list:

 

“In contrast with previous studies, often characterized by a positivistic-deterministic hermeneutics and, consequently, by a largely passive analysis of source material or literary topoi, the new critical perspective pursued in this volume will take into account a wider European intertextual dimension and, above all, an ideological interpretation of the ‘aesthetics’ or ‘politics’ of intertextuality which will allow the analysis of the presence of the Italian world in early modern England not as a traditional treasure trove of influence and imitation but as a potential cultural force, generating complex processes of appropriation, transformation, and ideological opposition throughout a continuous dialectical interchange of compliance and subversion.”

 

I believe that anyone who could write this way, or approve of this writing, should not be teaching Shakespeare. A rash attitude, perhaps, but mine own.

 

Best wishes,

David Bishop

 

Pale Fire

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 24.0017  Wednesday, 16 January 2013

 

From:        Peter Hyland <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         January 15, 2013 7:36:36 PM EST

Subject:     Re: SHAKSPER: Pale Fire

 

Oh dear. I had thought Charles Weinstein had gone into hiding, but here he is again, again pissing on Simon Russell Beale. Has he ever liked anything? He has, of course, a perfect right to dislike things, but it’s unfortunate that he needs to dislike so intensely anything that moves away from his conception of the boundaries of the text. I hope this doesn’t herald a new silly season.

 

Peter Hyland

 

GW Digital Humanities Symposium

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 24.0018  Thursday, 17 January 2013

 

From:        Emily Russell <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         January 16, 2013 8:33:24 PM EST

Subject:     Upcoming GW Digital Humanities Symposium

 

GW Digital Humanities Symposium

Symposium website: http://www.gwu.edu/~acyhuang/DH2013.shtml

 

Thursday January 24 - Saturday January 26, 2013

 

A Symposium at George Washington University

 

Digital humanities is a vibrant field that uses digital technologies to study the interactions between cultural artifacts and the society. In our second decade of the twenty-first century, we face a number of questions about the values, methods, and goals of humanistic inquiries at the intersection of digital media and theory.

 

Panel presentations are designed with a broad audience in mind and address multiple disciplines that range from computer science and media studies to gender and race studies, digital pedagogy, and literary studies.  

 

Topics we will address in this inaugural GW Digital Humanities Symposium (initiated by Medieval and Early Modern Studies Institute and Dean’s Scholars in Shakespeare Program) include:

 

Digital and “analogue” scholarship: goals, methods, best practices

 

Challenges of working with and against multiple media

 

(In)visible histories of race, gender, and avenues of access

 

Disability, cultural difference, and linguistic diversity

 

Visual and print cultures, embodiment, archiving the ephemeral

 

Canon formation, close and distant reading strategies

 

Resistance to digital humanities and issues of legitimacy

 

Promise, perils, and future trends of digital humanities and pedagogy

 

 

The symposium will feature provocative 15-minute presentations; a Skype session; hands-on proof-of-concept sessions; digital pedagogy sessions; emphasis on live discussion and debates; free Wi-Fi for all - bring your own laptop, tablet, or smart phone; on-site digital humanities book display and sales; videos of the talks may be available online.

 

The symposium will begin on Thursday evening with a screening of the film “Anna May Wong: In Her Own Words” (http://www.wmm.com/filmcatalog/pages/c830.shtml) presented by director Yunah Hong. Lily Wong, an Assistant Professor of Literature at American University, will offer a response after the screening.  This event will be held in the Media and Public Affairs building on The George Washington University Campus, 805 21st St. NW, room 310.  The film will begin at 7:30 and has a run time of about 90 minutes.

 

Friday’s events will begin at 9 am in the Jack Morton Auditorium, 805 21st NW, with opening remarks by Alex Huang and Vice Provost Paul Berman followed by the keynote presentation, “The Digital Text as Inhabited Object,” delivered by Elaine Treharne, professor of English at Stanford University.  It will be a full day of panels covering a wide range of topics. You can view a schedule of panels and presentation abstracts on the Digital Humanities website. (http://www.gwu.edu/~acyhuang/DH2013.shtml)  The symposium will conclude on Saturday with a half-day of panel presentations focusing on pedagogy and best practices.  Location information for Saturday’s events will be updated shortly.

 

Of special interest to members of SHAKSPER are medievalists and early modernists who will be speaking at the conference, including Elaine Treharne, Katherine Rowe, Sarah Werner, Janelle Jenstad, Sheila Cavanagh, Kevin Quarmby, Christy Desmet, Candace Barrington, Jeffrey Cohen, Jonathan Hsy, Peter Donaldson, Alexander Huang, Will Noel, Josh Eyler, Jyotsna Singh, Brett Hirsch, and others.

 

The Digital Humanities Symposium is a free event and is open to the public but we do ask that you register using the link on the website if you plan to attend. (http://www.gwu.edu/~acyhuang/DH2013.shtml

 

Symposium poster: pdf  GW Digital Humanities Symposium

 

[Editor's Note: I will be attending and hope to meet any SHAKSPER subscribers who will also be present. -Hardy]

 

Q: Hamletism

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 24.0016  Wednesday, 16 January 2013

 

From:        Michelle Assay <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         January 16, 2013 5:44:18 AM EST

Subject:     Question Regarding HAMLETISM

 

Hamletism is a notion particularly important in Russian culture. Turgeniev was an important figure regarding this notion. But I wonder if the term was coined beforehand?

 

Thanks for your help.

 

Michelle Assay

Université Paris Sorbonne, University of Sheffield

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

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