2013

Susannah Carson on ‘Living with Shakespeare’

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 24.0072  Monday, 18 February 2013

 

From:        John F Andrews <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         Saturday, February 16, 2013 10:16 PM

Subject:     Susannah Carson on ‘Living with Shakespeare’

 

Monday, April 22, at 7:30 p.m.    

National Arts Club, 15 Gramercy Park South

No Charge, but Reservations Advised

 

“There is no God but God, and his name is William Shakespeare.” So asserts Harold Bloom in his foreword to LIVING WITH SHAKESPEARE, a new anthology by SUSANNAH CARSON. A Yale-educated writer who now lives in London, Ms. Carson has compiled observations and personal reminiscences by more than three dozen luminaries, among them authors Isabel Allende, Margaret Drabble, Joyce Carol Oates, and Jane Smiley, filmmakers Ralph Fiennes and Julie Taymor, and actors F. Murray Abraham, Brian Cox, James Earl Jones, Ben Kingsley, Anthony Sher, and Harriet Walter. What these and other contributors share is a conviction that “we live in Shakespeare’s world,” an environment that has been “fine-tuned for us” by a poet whose vision is so potent “that it’s difficult to conceive who we would be” if he’d never existed. Published in time to mark the 449th celebration of Shakespeare’s birth, Ms. Carson’s book will be on display, and she’ll be happy to inscribe copies for those who wish to purchase them.

 

Launch: Issue 7.2. of Borrowers and Lenders

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 24.0071  Monday, 18 February 2013

 

From:        Sujata Iyengar <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         February 15, 2013 5:46:28 PM EST

Subject:     Launch: Issue 7.2. of Borrowers and Lenders: The Journal of Shakespeare and Appropriation

 

The editors of Borrowers and Lenders: The Journal of Shakespeare and Appropriation are delighted to announce the launch of issue 7.2, featuring a lavishly-illustrated essay by Alfredo Modenessi on Indian and “Indian” Othellos, Stephannie Gearhart’s analysis of Lear’s Daughters, Pamela Swanigan’s multimedia exposition on the music of Baz Luhrmann’s Romeo + Juliet, as well as a special cluster on Shakespeare and African American Poetics (in association with the Langston Hughes Review and one on Punchdrunk Theatre’s cult New York Haunted House/Macbeth installation, Sleep No More

 

Please visit www.borrowers.uga.edu for the current Table of Contents.

 

In the Case of Egan vs. Elliott: A Reply to Larry Weiss et al.

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 24.0069  Friday, 15 February 2013

 

[1] From:        Larry Weiss <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

     Date:         February 15, 2013 1:33:15 AM EST

     Subject:     Re: SHAKSPER: Egan/Elliott 

 

[2] From:        Ian Steere <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

     Date:         February 15, 2013 10:23:00 AM EST

     Subject:     Egan vs Elliott 

 

 

[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------

From:        Larry Weiss <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         February 15, 2013 1:33:15 AM EST

Subject:     Re: SHAKSPER: Egan/Elliott

 

What with the SAA coming up next month and a number of other projects in progress, it might be a little while before I have a chance to consider Michael Egan’s 40-page single spaced submission and consult my colleagues on the panel as to whether any reconsideration of our opinion is warranted, but this surely should not take a year and a half.

 

In the meantime, I would be grateful if anyone would let me know, on SHAKSPER or privately, if they think Egan has made valid criticisms.

 

L. Weiss

 

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------

From:        Ian Steere <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         February 15, 2013 10:23:00 AM EST

Subject:     Egan vs Elliott

 

I enjoyed reading Michael Egan’s defense, which I thought was well presented and generally informative.  

 

One point in his conclusion puzzles me, however. He says that 1 Richard II must have been written “decades” before Shakespeare composed works such as 2 Henry VI. Is there a misprint here?

 

Richard III’s Remains Positively Identified

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 24.0070  Friday, 15 February 2013

 

From:        Larry Weiss <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         February 15, 2013 1:42:36 AM EST

Subject:     Re: SHAKSPER: R3

 

Joe Egert quotes my response to David Basch’s contention that RIII dramatizes a passage in the Book of Psalms, in which I said that the play

 

>better illustrates the verities of Exodus 21:20-21, which encapsulates 

>the essence of OT morality:

>

>And if a man smite his servant, or his maid, with a rod, and he die 

>under his hand; he shall be surely punished.

>

>Notwithstanding, if he continue a day or two, he shall not be punished: 

>for he is his money.

 

Joe says he has trouble following my point and asks me to elaborate.  Sure:

 

It’s a joke son.  In my evidently inept fashion I was trying to make the point that RIII no more illustrates the psalm cited by Basch than it does this particularly obnoxious OT passage.

 

PhD Studentship at DMU

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 24.0068  Friday, 15 February 2013

 

From:        Gabriel Egan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         February 15, 2013 11:06:52 AM EST

Subject:     PhD Studentship at DMU 

 

Dear SHAKSPERians,

 

Know a good candidate for a PhD scholarship, who is from the UK or elsewhere in the European Union? If so, please alert them to the following scholarship being offered at De Montfort University in Leicester, UK, within spitting distance of the (almost) final resting place of Richard 3.*

 

Gabriel Egan

 

* It’s currently obligatory for universities within a 20-mile radius to mention him in all communications.

 

___________

 

Adapting the Early Modern

 

School of Humanities, Faculty of Art, Design and Humanities, De Montfort University, Leicester

 

STARTING OCTOBER 2013

 

A PhD research studentship covering stipend and tuition fee costs is offered for a project that combines early modern literary or theatrical research with recent work on cultural adaptation. Working within the School’s Centre for Textual Studies and Centre for Adaptations, the student could explore such areas as how the editing of Shakespeare’s works necessarily adapts them for new readers, how Renaissance theatre is represented in films—from the Globe in Laurence Olivier’s Henry V (1944) to the Curtain in John Madden’s Shakespeare in Love (1998)--or how film portrayals of early modern dramatists such as Christopher Marlowe, Ben Jonson and John Webster engage with early modern, modern or postmodern notions of creativity. There is plenty of scope for the project to explore broader concerns of early modern authorship, publication and adaptation.

 

The Centre for Textual Studies and the Centre for Adaptations are integral to the research culture of the School of Humanities and while consisting largely of colleagues working in the subject area of English, staff also include scholars in Media, Film Studies, Drama and Technology. The two centres are internationally renowned and united by their concern with what happens to literary writing after it moves beyond the control of the originating author. Both centres have an established tradition of interdisciplinary research with externally funded international collaborations.

 

They are home to approximately 20 research students working on such topics as the Shakespearean star actor on film, Othello on screen, adapting Shakespeare for young children, printing and editing in the early modern period, Shakespeare’s fairy stories, the early modern book trade, and the histories and repertories of acting companies. The successful candidate for this studentship will become part of a highly active community of career-young scholars working on similar projects within a vibrant research culture. Research in the subject area of English at De Montfort University was ranked joint-ninth with English at Cambridge University in the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise (RAE).

 

For a more detailed description of the studentship project please visit our web site or contact Prof Gabriel Egan on +44 (0)116 25 77158 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

This research opportunity builds on our excellent past achievements and, looking forward to REF2014 and beyond, it will develop the university’s research capacity into new and evolving areas of study, enhancing DMU’s national and international research partnerships.

 

Applications are invited from UK or EU students with a good first degree (First, 2:1 or equivalent) in a relevant subject. Doctoral scholarships are available for up to three years full-time study starting October 2013 and provide a bursary of 13,770 GBP/pa in addition to university tuition fees.

 

To receive an application pack, please contact the Graduate School Office via email at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Completed applications should be returned together with two supporting references.

 

Please quote ref:  DMU Research Scholarships 2013

 

CLOSING DATE:  Friday 15th March 2013

__________________

 

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