2013

Question Regarding Pronunciation of “quit” as Shortened Version of “requite” . . .

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 24.0140  Friday, 29 March 2013

 

[1] From:         Gabriel Egan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

     Date:         March 26, 2013 7:15:37 PM EDT

     Subject:     Re: Rom. quit 

 

[2] From:         Larry Weiss <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

     Date:         March 27, 2013 12:12:34 AM EDT

     Subject:     Re: SHAKSPER: Rom. Quit 

 

 

[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------

From:         Gabriel Egan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         March 26, 2013 7:15:37 PM EDT

Subject:     Re: Rom. quit

 

Responding to my query about why Larry Weiss thinks the Folio text of Hamlet was printed from its Q3, Weiss gives references that support the claim that the Folio text of Romeo and Juliet was printed from its Q3. The talking at cross-purposes is my fault, as I mistakenly thought we were discussing Hamlet. I apologize for wasting his time.

 

Gabriel Egan

 

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------

From:         Larry Weiss <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         March 27, 2013 12:12:34 AM EDT

Subject:      Re: SHAKSPER: Rom. Quit

 

In response to my observation that 

 

>Q2, which is the better text, has “quit.” Q1 is a bad quarto, and 

>F1 seems to have been printed from Q3, which doesn’t have 

>substantive authority. However, I agree that the word means 

>“requite,” but this can be noted in a commentary note. If an 

>editor adopts “quite” s/he should probably spell it “'quite” to 

>indicate that it is a clipped form.

 

Steve Urk...owitz asked the musical question 

 

>Might (pronounced “mitt?”) it not be a better idea for the 

>editorial community to invite (pronounced “invitt”?) its 

>readers to accept the vagaries of so much early spelling 

>and just leave ‘em alone unless a serious problem erupts?

 

I think we are in agreement.  As I thought I had said, the best copytext is Q2, which has “quit,” a plausible reading—see my later conjecture of “quit” as in “acquit,” and never forget dificilior lectio—so I would not emend it.  As for “quite,” all I said was that if (much virtue in that word) an editor chooses to emend to “quite,” the word should be spelled (pronounced spelt) with an initial apostrophe to signify the clipped syllable.  I do not regard the apostrophe as an emendation, as it does not alter the word.  I think editors have fairly wide latitude in altering pointing and diacritical accidentals for the sake of clarity when that doesn’t alter the meaning.  Otherwise, we would read nothing but facsimiles and diplomatic original spelling editions.

 

I don’t suppose this post will see the light of day until after the SAA, by which time Steve and I might both be in a Canadian jail (gaol?) for feloniously hurling bad jokes at each other. Hardy, please being bail (baol?) money.

 

Ardenwatch

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 24.0139  Friday, 29 March 2013

 

From:         Peter Groves <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         March 26, 2013 11:57:06 PM EDT

Subject:     Re: SHAKSPER: Ardenwatch

 

Speaking of Arden3, does anyone know why they abandoned the traditional and helpful (at least to beginners) convention of indicating metrically-sounded suffixes of preterites and past participles with a diacritic (as in “Hence banishèd is banished from the world”, RJ 3.3.19)?  The information can be found cluttering up the footnotes, but you need to know there is a problem before you go looking for a solution, and the text doesn’t indicate this.  Do they have so low an opinion of modern students that they think they will be baffled by forms like <banishèd>?

 

Peter Groves

 

Shakespeare and His Contemporaries Graduate Conference 2013

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 24.0137  Friday, 29 March 2013

 

From:         Sofia Novello <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         March 27, 2013 12:55:10 PM EDT

Subject:     Shakespeare and His Contemporaries Graduate Conference 2013

 

Shakespeare Graduate Conference by the British Institute of Florence

 

 

Thursday 18 April 2013, The Harold Acton Library

 

Shakespeare and His Contemporaries Graduate Conference: The Italian Connection

 

Chairs: Prof. Fernando Cioni (Università degli Studi di Firenze) and Prof. Shaul Bassi (Ca' Foscari University, Venice)

 

The full programme is available at http://www.britishinstitute.it/en/event/414/shakespeare-week-shakespeare-and-his-contemporaries-graduate-conference-2013/.

 

Sofia Novello

The British Institute of Florence

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

Bard of Avon Origin

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 24.0138  Friday, 29 March 2013

 

From:         David Frankel <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         March 28, 2013 6:25:03 PM EDT

Subject:     Bard of Avon Origin

 

I was wondering if anyone knew the origin of “the bard of Avon” sobriquet – that is, who first used it and when?  Is there an identifiable origin, or did it just start appearing?

 

Thanks.

C. David Frankel

Assistant Director of Theatre

School of Theatre and Dance

University of South Florida

 

SAA

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 24.0136  Tuesday, 26 March 2013

 

From:        Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         Tuesday, March 26, 2013

Subject:     SAA

 

Dear SHAKSPER Subscribers,

 

I leave tomorrow morning for the SAA in Toronto, so digests will be intermittent over the next few days.

 

This will be my first SAA in a number of years, and I look forward to seeing many old friends and subscribers.

 

Over the past few years, I have been fortunate to have such excellent doctors who have in many respects given my life back to me, so if it has been some time since we last met don’t expect to see me with a cane.

 

Best wishes to all,

Hardy Cook

Editor of SHAKSPER

 

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