2013

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 24.0125  Friday, 22 March 2013

 

[1] From:        Duncan Salkeld <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

     Date:         March 21, 2013 6:02:11 PM EDT

     Subject:     RE: Rom. Quit 

 

[2] From:        Tiffany AC Moore <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

     Date:         March 21, 2013 6:21:19 PM EDT

     Subject:     Re: Rom. Quit 

 

 

[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------

From:        Duncan Salkeld <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         March 21, 2013 6:02:11 PM EDT

Subject:     RE: Rom. Quit

 

Larry earlier stated that the 1597 Q of R&J was a ‘bad’ quarto. In fairness, I think it should be pointed out that for a ‘bad’ quarto, it’s actually rather good—i.e., far less defective than 1600 Henry V or 1603 Hamlet

 

The question that intrigues me is—what happened to make R&J Q1 such a good ‘bad’ quarto?

 

Duncan Salkeld

 

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------

From:        Tiffany AC Moore <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         March 21, 2013 6:21:19 PM EDT

Subject:     Re: Rom. Quit

 

>Quit, as OED points out, came into English in the ‘repay’ sense 

>with a long vowel, but it soon shortened (as shown most clearly 

>by citations with a following tt spelling). A 1595 citation where 

>the word is spelled quitt shows that this was in place by then. 

>

>As a clipped form of “requite,” the word would naturally be 

>pronounced with a long vowel.  But we can’t exclude the 

>possibility that “quit” should be pronounced with a short “i,” 

>as a clipped form of “acquit,” which has a similar meaning—to 

>discharge, as a debt.  But the OED quoted here seems not 

>to have considered this possibility.  Am I wrong or did they 

>miss it?

 

Larry—interesting point, but that definition doesn’t seem to fit in Romeo’s line to the Nurse...seems like he means repay, not anything like “acquit.”

 

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