2013

“So much for Buckingham”

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 24.0120  Thursday, 21 March 2013

 

From:        Al Magary <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         March 20, 2013 5:35:06 PM EDT

Subject:     “So much for Buckingham”

 

Stirring Richard III’s bones a bit, I was wondering if anyone knows if any productions of Shakespeare’s play these days have revived Colley Cibber’s famous insertion, “Off with his head; so much for Buckingham.”  It’s a delicious corruption.

 

Cheers,

Al Magary

 

Question Regarding Pronunciation of “quit” as Shortened Version of “requite” . . .

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 24.0119  Wednesday, 20 March 2013

 

[1] From:        Crystal David <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

     Date:         March 19, 2013 3:20:32 PM EDT

     Subject:     Q: Rom. “quit” 

 

[2] From:        Gabriel Egan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

     Date:         March 19, 2013 6:33:42 PM EDT

     Subject:     Re: SHAKSPER: Q: Rom. “quit” 

 

[3] From:        Tiffany AC Moore <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

     Date:         March 20, 2013 9:29:38 AM EDT

     Subject:     Re: SHAKSPER: Q: Rom. “quit” 

 

 

[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------

From:        Crystal David <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         March 19, 2013 3:20:32 PM EDT

Subject:     Q: Rom. “quit” 

 

The evidence suggests that requite had a diphthong (of a schwa + i character). In the canon there’s only one rhyme with requite (requite thee / incite thee, Much Ado 1202) but this is reinforced by eight with quite (delight, fight, night, recite, sight, sprite, tonight, write). Spellings with a single t and final e generally support this—but there are two instances which could be evidence of a short vowel (or they could be just typos, of course): requitted (Coriolanus 2727) and requits (Richard III 904). 

 

Quit, as OED points out, came into English in the ‘repay’ sense with a long vowel, but it soon shortened (as shown most clearly by citations with a following tt spelling). A 1595 citation where the word is spelled quitt shows that this was in place by then. 

 

So the question is whether a long variant was still around in the 1590s, as suggested by the quite spelling. Unfortunately, the final -e is no guide, as this was still being used unsystematically by printers without any phonological implications, and spelling reformers like Richard Mulcaster were arguing that there were far too many unnecessary final e’s around, and they should go. So we can’t read much in from the quite/quite spelling variation in the Folio/Quarto. There’s no rhyming evidence for quit in Shakespeare, unfortunately. But the OED does have a 1578 citation where quyte is rhymed with dispyte, perfyte, and wyte, suggesting a long vowel. And occasional references by the orthoepists hint at this variant being used well into the 17th century.

 

There’s nothing unusual in the existence of variant pronunciations, of course. There are several cases in Shakespeare where a word has both long and short vowel variants. Again is probably the clearest example, sometimes rhyming with amain, brain, complain, etc and sometimes with men, pen, then, etc - as it still does today.

 

One has to take a view, as the lawyers say. My feeling is that quit was usually pronounced short, and requite long, but the variants would still be occasionally heard, especially in regional speech.

 

David Crystal

 

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------

From:        Gabriel Egan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         March 19, 2013 6:33:42 PM EDT

Subject:     Re: SHAKSPER: Q: Rom. “quit”

 

Larry Weiss wrote of Hamlet

 

> F1 seems to have been printed from Q3,

> which doesn't have substantive authority.

 

I’d be interested to hear the reasons for this assertion about the Folio text of Hamlet.

 

Gabriel Egan

 

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------

From:        Tiffany AC Moore <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         March 20, 2013 9:29:38 AM EDT

Subject:     Re: SHAKSPER: Q: Rom. “quit”

 

Larry:  But would you be inclined to say the best pronunciation would be “quite” instead of “quit”—that is, the “long” vowel sound, as opposed to the short.  

 

Even if the Q or F are “bad” the spelling could indicate what the scribe heard and that seems like “quite” even though it’s spelled “quit”.

 

Juliet is the Sun

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 24.0117  Wednesday, 20 March 2013

 

From:        Marianne Kimura <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         March 20, 2013 8:24:50 AM EDT

Subject:     Juliet is the Sun

 

Dear SHAKSPER members,

 

Under the pseudonym Gemma Nishiyama, I have written a novel entitled Juliet is the Sun, about Viola, “shipwrecked” after fleeing the Fukushima nuclear accident for the mountains of Western Japan. Leaving her estranged husband back in the north, and facing an uncertain future, Viola believes her life has been a failure. But the ghost of Shakespeare appears in her life and things dramatically improve. 

 

Saying “my way is to conjure you” (a line from As You Like It) the ghost stages performances for her. Viola thus learns that a mystery, a hidden identity of a mysterious figure who needs to be acknowledged, lies concealed in one of Shakespeare’s plays. She reaches out to a professor of Renaissance philosophy at the local university for some historical background and perspective. Viola’s estranged husband Kazuo, another academic, also gets drawn into the mystery.  

 

Like The DaVinci Code, Juliet is the Sun reveals that a major artwork has been concealing an important secret for centuries—in plain sight! (Indeed, the best secrets are always the ones hiding in plain sight!)

 

As a basic interpretive framework, I have used the original research I published (under my real name) relating to the concept of a cosmic and solar energy-related secret play in Romeo and Juliet. A few other plays (Hamlet, King Lear, Macbeth, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, and Much Ado About Nothing) are also shown in the course of the novel to also be Renaissance puzzle boxes that use this secret (Hermetic) solar structure.

 

The name and philosophical importance (to Shakespeare) of a natural philosopher who was executed in Rome by the Catholic Church for heresy in 1600 is unveiled—and his secret identity as a character hiding in one of Shakespeare’s plays is also revealed.

 

The novel is set in the mountains of Western Japan (where I live), a green, wooded and mysterious place with ghosts, legends, ruined castles, Shinto shrines and Buddhist temples. Japanese folkloric spirits, mythic foxes and Shinto mythology (which has a living Sun Goddess) all appear in the novel. Ninjas and Ninjutsu (the art and philosophy of Ninja) play an important role. 

 

Juliet is the Sun spans one year exactly, in tribute to the sun and our earth’s rotation around our nearest and most useful star. There are also many quotes from Shakespeare’s plays used in many ways—as decoration, as dialogue, and as comic counterpoint. Some of Shakespeare’ s famous characters magically appear.

 

The soul of the novel belongs to manga, (Japanese comic books)— episodic, with a light-hearted, popular style, an earnest heroine, a mysterious quest and visitors from supernatural worlds. 

 

One of my goals was to use fiction (instead of non-fiction) to try interpretation, and I aimed for something dramatic, passionate, clandestine, free and zen ~~~ a true adventure. 

 

Finally, Viola’s passion for life and for love is reawakened . . . but should she publish her academic findings or not—that is the question!

 

In addition, there are a few “puzzle boxes” hidden in the text of my novel. (Readers may hunt for these (unmarked) puzzles and solve them, hopefully.)

 

Who knew that Shakespeare could be zen?! 

 

Juliet is the Sun is available now on Amazon as an ebook. 

 

Marianne Kimura

Women of Will

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 24.0118  Wednesday, 20 March 2013

 

From:        John Zuill <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         March 19, 2013 9:40:57 PM EDT

Subject:     Women of Will

 

I saw “Women of Will,” in February. Very enjoyable. Very good indeed. Deserves all the credit it gets.

Question Regarding Pronunciation of “quit” as Shortened Version of “requite” . . .

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 24.0116  Tuesday, 19 March 2013

 

From:        Larry Weiss <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         March 19, 2013 12:25:00 AM EDT

Subject:     Re: SHAKSPER: Q: Rom. “quit” 

 

Q2, which is the better text, has “quit.” Q1 is a bad quarto, and F1 seems to have been printed from Q3, which doesn’t have substantive authority. However, I agree that the word means “requite,” but this can be noted in a commentary note. If an editor adopts “quite” s/he should probably spell it “'quite” to indicate that it is a clipped form.

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