2013

Alonso Resigns a Dukedom?

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 24.0242  Monday, 13 May 2013

[1] From:        David Richman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

     Date:         May 10, 2013 3:37:43 PM EDT

     Subject:     Re: SHAKSPER: Alonso 

 

[2] From:        Larry Weiss <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

     Date:         May 10, 2013 5:06:20 PM EDT

     Subject:     Re: Alonso

 

 

[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------

From:        David Richman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         May 10, 2013 3:37:43 PM EDT

Subject:     Re: SHAKSPER: Alonso

 

I have a suggestion about Alonso’s resignation of the dukedom; it is a dramatic, not a historical suggestion. We discussed this problem when we did the Tempest on Appledore Island a few years ago. Antonio is putative Duke, but he holds the dukedom under Alonso—with whom he had entered into an agreement. Alonso provided troops for the coup, and Alonso’s man, Gonzalo, was in charge of spiriting Prospero and his daughter away. Thus, Antonio is Duke under Alonso, and Alonso, who hath given, can take away.  

 

David Richman

 

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------

From:        Larry Weiss <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         May 10, 2013 5:06:20 PM EDT

Subject:     Re: Alonso

 

>Thy dukedom I resign and do entreat

>Thou pardon me my wrongs. But how should Prospero

>Be living and be here?  [TEMPEST, 5.1.113-120]

>The problem: How can Alonso resign a dukedom he doesn’t 

>have? I’ve long known the discussion of Antonio’s near silence 

>in Act 5, and I’ve double-checked a few online facsimiles of 

>the scene in the folio, and there’s no mistaking the attribution 

>of the line to Alonso.

 

Easy one. As Prospero explained to Miranda (I.ii.111-16), Antonio subjected Milan to the suzerainty of Alonso, “To give him annual tribute, do him homage.” One could argue that Milan was not Antonio’s dukedom to give, but he surely held it in trust for Prospero. The trust might have been a constructive one, if Antonio had not been granted the trust by voluntary act of the lawful owner, but it was a trust nonetheless. Actually, the trust seems to have been an express one; at I.ii.70-75 Prospero says he conferred the government of Milan on Antonio much the same as Vincentio made Angelo his deputy duke (see M/M,I.i.17-21).  

 

CFP: Seminar 5: Shakespeare and the Visual Arts

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 24.0240  Monday, 13 May 2013

 

From:        Michele Marrapodi <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         May 13, 2013 8:43:27 AM EDT

Subject:     CFP: Seminar 5: Shakespeare and the Visual Arts

 

Seminar 5: Shakespeare and the Visual Arts

Shakespeare Anniversary, Paris

Call for Papers

 

Seminar leader: Michele Marrapodi, University of Palermo

 

Critical investigation into the rubric of “Shakespeare and the visual arts” has generally focused on the influence exerted by the works of Shakespeare on a number of artists, painters, and sculptors in the course of the centuries. Relying on the aesthetics of intertextuality and profiting from the more recent concepts of cultural mobility and permeability between cultures in the early modern period, this seminar will study instead the dramatic use and function of Renaissance material arts and artists in Shakespeare’s oeuvre. Among the great variety of possible topics, participants in the “Shakespeare and the visual arts” Seminar may like to consider:

  • the impact of optics and pictorial perspective;
  • anamorphosis and trompe l’oeil effects on the whole range of visual representation; 
  • the rhetoric of “verbal painting” in dramatic discourse;
  • the actual citation and intertextuality of classical and Renaissance artists;
  • the legacy of iconographic topoi;
  • the humanistic debate or Paragone of the Sister Arts;
  • the use of emblems and emblematic language;
  • explicit and implicit ekphrasis and ekphrastic passages in the plays
  • ekphrastic intertextuality, etc.

Registered participants are invited to submit by 10th August 2013 to the address below a one-page abstract of their proposed article on any aspect of the relationship between the age of Shakespeare and Renaissance arts, including the theoretical approach of the arts in the drama of Shakespeare and his contemporaries. Every abstract (approx. 250 words) should include the participant’s name, email, affiliation, and title of the proposed contribution.

 

Prof. Michele Marrapodi

Facoltà di Lettere e Filosofia

University of Palermo

A New Source for “A Midsummer Night’s Dream”?

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 24.0238  Friday, 10 May 2013

 

From:        Larry Weiss <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         May 9, 2013 10:29:46 PM EDT

Subject:     Re: SHAKSPER: MND Source? 

 

Kimura-sensei’s conjecture that The Birds is a source for MND is fascinating, but I wonder why she doesn’t say the same about the closing Cuckoo song in LLL. Unfortunately, to come to an informed judgment about this, we need to have the original Greek text of The Birds, and I have mislaid mine, as well as Greek translations of MND and LLL. Perhaps Kimura-sensei could supply them and point out the similarities.

 

Anglo-Italian Renaissance Studies

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 24.0239  Monday, 13 May 2013

 

From:        Michele Marrapodi <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         May 13, 2013 8:41:27 AM EDT

Subject:     Anglo-Italian Renaissance Studies

 

Dear SHAKSPEReans,

I am pleased to announce the publication of the following new books in the Ashgate series “Anglo-Italian Renaissance Studies”:

 

 

Shakespeare Among the Courtesans

Prostitution, Literature, and Drama, 1500-1650

Duncan Salkeld, University of Chichester, UK 

 

“Courtesans – women who achieve wealth, status, or power through sexual transgression – have played both a central and contradictory role in literature: they have been admired, celebrated, feared, and vilified. This study of the courtesan in Renaissance English drama focuses not only on the moral ambivalence of these women, but with special attention to Anglo-Italian relations, illuminates little known aspects of their lives. It traces the courtesan from a wry comedic character in the plays of Terence and Plautus to its literary exhaustion in the seventeenth-century dramatic works of Dekker, Marston, Webster, Middleton, Shirley and Brome. The author focuses especially on the presentation of the courtesan in the sixteenth century - dramas by Shakespeare, Marlowe, and Lyly view the courtesan as a symbol of social disease and decay, transforming classical conventions into English prejudices.

 

Renaissance Anglo-Italian cultural and sexual relations are also investigated through comparisons of travel narratives, original source materials, and analysis of Aretino's representations of celebrated Italian courtesans. Amid these fascinating tales of aspiration, desire and despair lingers the intriguing question of who was the 'dark lady' of Shakespeare's sonnets.”

 

 

Machiavellian Encounters in Tudor and Stuart England

Literary and Political Influences from the Reformation to the Restoration

Edited by Alessandro Arienzo, the University of Naples, ‘Federico II’, Italy and Alessandra Petrina, the Università degli Studi di Padova, Italy

 

“Taking into consideration the political and literary issues hanging upon the circulation of Machiavelli’s works in England, this volume highlights how topics and ideas stemming from Machiavelli’s books-including but not limited to the Prince- strongly influenced the contemporary political debate.

 

The first section discusses early reactions to Machiavelli’s works, focusing on authors such as Reginald Pole and William Thomas, depicting their complex interaction with Machiavelli. In section two, different features of Machiavelli’s reading in Tudor literary and political culture are discussed, moving well beyond the traditional image of the tyrant or of the evil Machiavel. Machiavelli’s historiography and republicanism and their influences on Tudor culture are discussed with reference to topical authors such as Walter Raleigh, Alberico Gentili, Philip Sidney; his role in contemporary dramatic writing, especially as concerns Christopher Marlowe and William Shakespeare, is taken into consideration. The last section explores Machiavelli’s influence on English political culture in the seventeenth century, focusing on reason of state and political prudence, and discussing writers such as Henry Parker, Marchamont Nedham, James Harrington, Thomas Hobbes and Anthony Ascham.

 

Overall, contributors put Machiavelli’s image in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century England into perspective, analyzing his role within courtly and prudential politics, and the importance of his ideological proposal in the tradition of republicanism and parliamentarianism.” 

 

 

New book proposals and edited collections of essays are welcome.

 

For a complete list of published and forthcoming books in the series, see the Ashgate website:
 http://www.ashgate.com/default.aspx?page=638&seriestitleID=370&calcTitle=1&forthcoming=1
 

Best wishes,
Michele Marrapodi
General Editor

University of Palermo, Italy

 

Hollow Crown Finally Scheduled

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 24.0237  Friday, 10 May 2013

 

From:        Larry Weiss <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         May 9, 2013 10:22:31 PM EDT

Subject:     Re: SHAKSPER: Hollow Crown

 

>PBS has FINALLY announced airdates for THE HOLLOW 

>CROWN films, which went out in England at the time of the Olympics.

 

This is wonderful news.  Are there any plans to mount the Second Tetralogy too, as was done in the original series?

 

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