2013

Petruchio

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 24.0293  Friday, 14 June 2013

 

From:        Thomas Pendleton <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         June 13, 2013 3:15:15 PM EDT

Subject:     Petruchio

 

Folks,

 

Larry Weiss was right. I missed the Q1 entry of “Petruchio,” and thus, Rene Weiss’s choice of speech prefix is quite defensible.

 

Tom Pendleton

 

Away Tybalt

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 24.0292  Wednesday, 12 June 2013

From:        John Drakakis <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         June 10, 2013 1:41:54 PM EDT

Subject:     RE: Away

 

For Pervez Rizvi: 

 

I think the suggestions regarding The Merchant of Venice are interesting, but I think that ‘Replie, Replie’ although it is in italics on the right hand side of the page in Q, works better metrically if it is part of the song. The song is envisaged here as a dialogue where the first stanza asks a series of questions that are then answered in the second. It is quite likely that the ‘reply’ comes from one of two singers, and this would account for “Ile begin it” in roman on sig.E4v spoken by one of the two singers. I think that John Dover Wilson got this right. The second example that Rivzi chooses is less convincing since it is positioned as a stage direction. Salerio’s deictic “his letter there / vvill show you his estate.” would surely not require a further, possibly impertinent insistence: ‘open the letter’, since Bassanio is a ‘Lord’.

 

For Alan Dessen:

 

A pity that you stick with the usual explanation of Innogen, and in a play that emphasises the ‘silence’ of women. Is it not just as likely that Shakespeare simply forgot to note those occasions after 2.1 when Innogen might appear, but that it could reasonably be assumed that she would be present in the ‘public’ scenes that would normally require her to be present as Leonato’s wife. Her presence, especially at 4.1. and in the final scene of the play alters the play’s meanings significantly and raises some interesting gender questions that even ardent feminists seem reluctant to engage with. We owe much to Alan and to Lesley Thompson for assembling a very wide range of stage directions, but we are still uncertain, I think, about what a practising writer might be able to take for granted as part of the process envisioning a play. We know, for example, that in the same play Will Kemp ‘wrote’ the part of Dogberry, and ‘Couly’ that of Verges . . . let me quickly explain, that Shakespeare may have put the words they speak on paper (and even that is an assumption) BUT he is ventriloquising the language and style of two actors whose work he is intimately acquainted with.  Can we not say then that Kemp and Couly ‘wrote’ Shakespeare in this instance?

 

Cheers

John 

 

Stephen Booth Guest Speaker Chesapeake Shakespeare Company

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 24.0290  Thursday, 13 June 2013

 

From:        Kevin Costa <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         Wednesday, June 12, 2013 8:13 AM

Subject:     Stephen Booth Guest Speaker Chesapeake Shakespeare Company

 

The Chesapeake Shakespeare Company’s summer season is underway in Ellicott City, MD (a historic town about twenty minutes from Baltimore and DC). This summer, CSC presents Antony & Cleopatra (directed by Ralph Alan Cohen, co-found of The American Shakespeare Center) and The Taming of the Shrew (directed by CSC’s founding artistic director, Ian Gallanar). 

 

For years, CSC has offered a program called "Extended Versions," pre-show talks and presentations where audience members have an opportunity to engage with actors, directors, and scholars. We are very pleased to announce that Stephen Booth, professor emeritus at UC-Berkeley, will be speaking on Friday, June 21at 7 pm at the Patapsco Female Institute (the location of our outdoor theatre) accompanied by Sarah Enloe, Director of Education at the American Shakespeare Center. The talk is included in our regular ticket price.

 

For tickets and more information, please visit CSC’s Web site: www.chesapeakeshakespeare.com or contact Kevin Costa, Director of Education at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

Kevin J. Costa, Ph.D.

Education Director

Chesapeake Shakespeare Company

www.chesapeakeshakespeare.com

Teaching Artist, Folger Shakespeare Library

 

Summer Shakespeare Plays and Festivals

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 24.0291  Wednesday, 12 June 2013

 

[1] From:        Anna Kamaralli <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

     Date:         June 12, 2013 10:31:28 PM EDT

     Subject:     Re: Summer Shakespeare 

 

[2] From:        Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

     Date:         Wednesday, June 12, 2013

     Subject:     Summer Shakespeare Plays and Festivals List 

 

[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------

From:        Anna Kamaralli <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         June 12, 2013 10:31:28 PM EDT

Subject:     Re: Summer Shakespeare

 

I would be happy to hold up the Sydney end of the reporting on/reviewing summer Shakespeare festivals, as long as no one will be too disorientated by the fact that summer means December - February here. Or too depressed by the fact that we don’t really have a summer Shakespeare festival. What we have is about three different co-op groups who do one or two outdoor shows somewhere between November and March, in different parts of the city, with no cohesiveness and very little professional profile. 

 

Sigh.

 

Anna Kamaralli

 

[Editor’s Note: It is not that I did not think of my colleagues in the Southern Hemisphere, it is just that at the time I did not know how to handle their Shakespeare festivals. Now I think I know how to see below. –Hardy]

 

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------

From:        Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         Wednesday, June 12, 2013

Subject:     Summer Shakespeare Plays and Festivals List

 

Dear SHAKSPEReans,

 

Now we have a starting place for listings of summer Shakespeare festivals and plays from the list that I posted the other day.

 

I have already gotten one addition which I have added both to the copy in Current Postings and to the one in Announcements.

 

I welcome any corrections or additions to the list.

 

I have been trying to get a tab under Scholarly Resources under the main Scholarly Resources section in the drop-down menu. When I figure this out I will announce it.

 

For now you may find the list by scrolling through the Announcements or Current Postings sections, in the archive under June 2013, or by holding your pointing device over the Scholarly resources tab and clicking directly on it and not on one of the drop-down items. By so doing you will get the page that is a sort of table of contents for Scholarly Resources. At the very bottom of this list is a link to the Summer Shakespeare Plays and Festivals list.

 

Every time that I get an addition or correction, I will send the updated list to the Announcements section.

 

Let us not forget that although the list is useful as it is, it also serves as a way to generate reviews/accounts for SHAKSPER and for ISE Chornicle.

 

Hardy

 

CFP—Shakespeare 450: Shakespeare and Global Girlhood

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 24.0289  Thursday, 13 June 2013

From:        Ariane Balizet <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         June 13, 2013 10:33:03 AM EDT

Subject:     CFP—Shakespeare 450: Shakespeare and Global Girlhood

 

Société française Shakespeare Conference: Shakespeare 450

Paris, April 21-27 2014

 

Call for papers: Shakespeare and Global Girlhood

Seminar leaders: Marcela Kostihová and Ariane Balizet

 

This seminar explores the ways in which Shakespeare is employed to define girlhood within and across national and cultural boundaries. When, how, and why does Shakespeare intersect with questions of girlhood? How does Shakespeare reflect, validate, or undermine debates over girls and girlhood? How are representations of girls in relation to Shakespeare (in adaptation, popular citation, or pedagogical practices) employed in conversations on global citizenship and/or national identity? We are particularly interested in papers (3,000-5,000 words) that identify Shakespearean influence in the study of girls and girlhood in advocacy, education, performance, artistic production (by, about, or marketed towards girls), cross-national politics, neoliberal subjectivity, citizenship, material culture, and health.

 

How does Shakespeare’s cultural capital influence the discourses of girlhood? The study of girls and girlhood has gained prominence in the past 20 years, marked by the rise of Girls’ Studies and the proliferation of interdisciplinary publications devoted to girlhood. In the United States, the 1994 publication of psychologist Mary Pipher’s Reviving Ophelia was a flashpoint in the legitimization of girlhood studies, linking one of Shakespeare’s tragic girl characters to the definition of Western female adolescence as a period of crisis. Since then, the name “Ophelia” has become powerfully associated with organizations that aim to “save” girls from bullying, eating disorders, and mental health issues (among other threats). International efforts explicitly dedicated to empowering women and young girls—such as the United Nations’ Resolution to designate October 11 the International Day of the Girl Child—reflect the idea that addressing the needs of young women is a global concern. In light of this increased awareness of the status of girls, events such as the assassination attempt of Pakistani blogger Malala Yousafzai—just two days before the first International Day of the Girl Child—reveal the profound and fundamental oppression facing many girls and their advocates worldwide. These tensions inform feminist scholarship on contemporary perspectives on Shakespeare’s girls, as modern productions and adaptations are increasingly set within a global context.  Despite the wealth of feminist scholarship on girls in Shakespeare, however, the extent to which Shakespeare’s cultural capital is used to articulate or authorize popular, political, and national definitions of girlhood has not received significant attention.

 

 

Proposals should be sent to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. and This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. by July 15, 2013. Please include name, email, affiliation, brief bio, preliminary abstract (250 words) and title of your contribution.

 

 

Conference Website: http://www.shakespeareanniversary.org/?-Shakespeare-450-

 

Seminar Website: http://www.shakespeareanniversary.org/?Seminar-19-Shakespeare-and-Global

 

 

Ariane M. Balizet

Assistant Professor of English and Women’s Studies

Texas Christian University

Department of English

 

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Search

Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.