2014

Book Signing!

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 25.121  Monday, 19 March 2014

 

From:        Jinny Webber <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         March 9, 2014 at 10:39:40 AM EDT

Subject:    Book Signing!

 

Dear reading friends,

 

Dark Venus is due out this month. I'll be reading from it and signing books Tuesday March 25 at 7 p.m., Granada Books, 1224 State Street next door to the Granada Theater in the back room and Thursday March 27, Chaucer's Books at 3321 State Street in the Loreto Plaza. 

 

Volume 2 of my Shakespeare Actor Trilogy, Dark Venus is a story of love and poetry as well as theatre. Besides continuing the adventures of the boy actor Alexander (Sander) Cooke—who in my version was born female—it focuses on a remarkable woman, Amelia Bassano Lanyer. The presumed dark lady of Shakespeare’s sonnets, Amelia published her own book of poetry in 1611. This novel shows what drove her to write it. Press release attached.

 

Please come to one of these two readings and tell your friends, especially those intrigued by poetry, Shakespeare, the woman’s voice in the tumultuous days of Queen Elizabeth I. Yes, there’s a political murder in this book, as there was in volume one, The Secret Player.

 

Press release attached.

 

Hope to see you there,

Jinny

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

 

Contact: George Spitzer, Nebbadoon Press 

325 E. Figueroa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101 

800-500-9086 This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. 

Dark Venus releases March 23, volume two of a three-book series of historical novels set in Shakespeare’s England. 

 

Jinny Webber, a professor of English in Santa Barbara, CA, 

recreates the England of William Shakespeare. 

 

Vol. 2: In DARK VENUS: Alexander (Sander) Cooke, protagonist of The Secret Player, befriends Amelia Bassano Lanyer, the presumed Dark Lady of Shakespeare’s sonnets. Historically, Amelia published a book of poetry in 1611, long after her affair with William Shakespeare. Dark Venus shows what drove Amelia to write that book, a first for a woman in Queen Elizabeth’s England. The friendship of Amelia and Sander plays out amidst the political turmoil that leads to the murder of Sander’s friend and patron Ferdinando Stanley, the Earl of Derby. 

 

Vol. 1: THE SECRET PLAYER: The protagonist Alexander Cooke, known as Sander, becomes a favorite performer of women’s roles on the London stage, where only males are allowed to act. A dangerous secret: Sander was born female. She is at risk of flogging or even death if her identity is discovered. A few suspect the truth, including William Shakespeare and Queen Elizabeth. Adding to her risks, she and he poet John Donne fall in love. In life and onstage, Sander Cooke dares to challenge the status quo. 

 

Vol 3: BEDTRICK (to be released in 2015): Sander’s brother John Cooke impregnates the seamstress Frances and refuses to marry her. A seemingly simple solution is for Alexander to marry Frances. Can a woman get away wit

 

Shakespeare and His Contemporaries Graduate Conference

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 25.120  Monday, 19 March 2014

 

From:        Sofia Novello <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         March 8, 2014 at 9:03:21 AM EST

Subject:    Shakespeare and His Contemporaries Graduate Conference 

 

Shakespeare and His Contemporaries Graduate Conference 2014

 

On Thursday 10 April The British Institute of Florence holds the 6th edition of the Shakespeare Graduate Conference on the theme Forms of Nationhood. The event is in collaboration with IASEMS - Italian Association of Shakespeare and Early Modern Studies - and with the University of Florence. Entrance is free and open to all. Seats are limited. Booking is recommended (by email  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or by phone at +39 055 26778270). Please note that it is possible to reserve a place for the light lunch in the Library and that we request a contribution for the lunch.  Please specify when you contact us whether you wish to be added to the lunch reservation list.

 

Sofia Novello

Library Assistant & Co-ordinator of the Shakespeare Graduate Conference

The British Institute of Florence

Palazzo Lanfredini

Lungarno Guicciardini 9

50125 Firenze

Italia

Phone +39 055 2677 8270

E-mail This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

Shakespeare Graduate Conference Programme:   pdf  Shakespeare and His Contemporaries Grad Student Conference 2014

 

B&L is out!

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 25.119  Monday, 19 March 2014

 

From:        Sujata Iyengar <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         March 7, 2014 at 4:15:24 PM EST

Subject:    B&L is out!

 

The Editors of Borrowers and Lenders: The Journal of Shakespeare and Appropriation joyfully announce the release of Volume 8.2 (Fall 2013/Winter 2014) at www.borrowers.uga.edu! Articles include Theresa DiPasquale’s richly illustrated exploration of Hawaiian Shakespeares, William Carroll’s witty discussion of the fictional afterlife of Shakespeare’s “fiend-like Queen” (including A.J. Hartley’s co-authored novelization of Macbeth) Lady Macbeth, Sebastian Lefait’s analysis of the televised Royal Shakespeare Company Hamlet (with several film-clips), and Kim Sturgess’s provocative response to the Shakespearean conspiracy film Anonymous. We also have a special cluster on “Service Shakespeare,” edited by Mike Jensen, which includes essays by Jensen, Yu Jin KoSheila CavanaghGeoff Ridden, and Isabelle Schwartz-Gastine as well as by active theatre practitioners Jim Amberg, Michael Bahr, and Don Weingust. We also include a review of Maurizio Calbi’s recent book, Spectral Shakespeares.

 

Please read us, “like” us on Facebook, cross-post this message, and, of course, keep on sending us your fine scholarly work on Shakespeare and appropriation!

 

Dr. Sujata Iyengar, Professor of English

Co-general editor of Borrowers and Lenders: The Journal of Shakespeare and Appropriation

Department of English

Park Hall

University of Georgia

Athens, GA 30602-6205

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. (editorial correspondence) 

 

Balcony Scene in Romeo and Juliet

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 25.118  Friday, 7 March 2014

 

[1] From:        Steve Roth <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

     Date:         March 6, 2014 at 7:21:30 PM EST

     Subject:    Re: SHAKSPER: Balcony 

 

[2] From:        Laurie Johnson <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

     Date:         March 6, 2014 at 11:47:14 PM EST

     Subject:    RE: SHAKSPER: Balcony 

 

 

[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------

From:        Steve Roth <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         March 6, 2014 at 7:21:30 PM EST

Subject:    Re: SHAKSPER: Balcony

 

@Marianne Kimura: "I shall try to get my hands on better texts."

 

And any other Shakespeareans who my not know of it . . .

 

Run don’t walk to Internet Shakespeare Editions @ U Victoria:

 

http://internetshakespeare.uvic.ca/Library/Texts/Rom/

 

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------

From:        Laurie Johnson <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         March 6, 2014 at 11:47:14 PM EST

Subject:    RE: SHAKSPER: Balcony

 

Gabriel Egan asks:

 

>Could I just check how you know that the 1599 quarto of Romeo 

>and Juliet was published before the opening of the Globe in 1599, 

>Laurie? I don’t want to miss any new certainties about what I 

>thought uncertain.

 

It is a fair question, and I must confess on reflection that it is based more on speculation than certainty. I base it on a number of factors, such as the lag time between “bad” Quartos and the appearance of newly augmented versions in other cases, other activities by Creede throughout 1599 and 1600, and the timing of the Bishops’ Ban in June (in which Creede’s print run of Micro-cynicon was among those burned). A few of these points are captured as tangential points in my extended discussion of Roberts and the Q2 Hamlet in my recent book, but you’re right that it is a claim to which should not be attributed the status of a certainty. Going back over my own notes, I see that it even still has a question mark next to it, meaning that I intended to revisit it, but allowed it to rigidify in my mind. Assertion withdrawn.

 

Perhaps it may be better to simply say that both Quartos were in print before R&J was performed at The Globe—since most scholarship I’ve encountered on the plays staged in the first 6 months at The Globe (June to November, 1599) don’t rate a mention of R&J.

 

Appreciate the gentle prod in the right direction, Gabriel. 

 

Cheers, 

Laurie.

 

Lecture, "Shakespeare and Catholicism"

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 25.117  Friday, 7 March 2014

 

From:        Dennis Taylor <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         March 7, 2014 at 10:21:55 AM EST

Subject:    Re: SHAKSPER: Shakespeare and Catholicism

 

Correction:  March 20 is the date for the Grace Memorial lectured at Holy Cross (“Shakespeare and Catholicism” by D. Taylor).  

 

Apologies!

 

[Editor’s Note: I have corrected the date in the archives Current Postings and Announcements. The corrected announce appears below. –Hardy]

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 25.115  Thursday, 6 March 2014

 

From:        Dennis Taylor <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         March 6, 2014 at 11:41:32 AM EST

Subject:    Lecture, "Shakespeare and Catholicism"

 

Dennis Taylor is giving the Thomas Grace S.J. Memorial lecture at Holy Cross College, Worcester, March 20, 4PM. The title is “Shakespeare and Catholicism.” Taylor is Emeritus Professor of English from Boston College, and founding editor of the journal, Religion and the Arts. He has published various essays on Shakespeare and edited Shakespeare and the Culture of Christianity in Early Modern England.

 

Dennis Taylor

Emeritus Professor of English

Editor Emeritus, Religion and the Arts

Boston College

Chestnut Hill MA 02467

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

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