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Roderigo's Fate
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 17.0950  Wednesday, 25 October 2006

[1] 	From: 	Mario DiCesare <
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	Date: 	Monday, 23 Oct 2006 16:49:13 -0400
	Subj: 	Re: SHK 17.0939 Roderigo's Fate

[2] 	From: 	William Godshalk <
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	Date: 	Monday, 23 Oct 2006 17:03:30 -0400
	Subj: 	Re: SHK 17.0939 Roderigo's Fate

[3] 	From: 	John Savage <
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	Date: 	Monday, 23 Oct 2006 17:40:16 -0400 (GMT-04:00)
	Subj: 	Re: SHK 17.0939 Roderigo's Fate

[4] 	From: 	Joseph Egert <
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	Date: 	Tuesday, 24 Oct 2006 17:53:36 +0000
	Subj: 	RE: SHK 17.0924 Roderigo's Fate


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Mario DiCesare <
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Date: 		Monday, 23 Oct 2006 16:49:13 -0400
Subject: 17.0939 Roderigo's Fate
Comment: 	Re: SHK 17.0939 Roderigo's Fate

Dear Colleagues,

The protestations regarding John Savage's statement about the non-death 
of Roderigo miss the mark. The phrasing -- "Roderigo pops up, alive, in 
V.ii" -- is not perfectly clear, but in fact there is a clear (and 
troubling) reference to Roderigo's being alive in Cassio's lines, "and 
even now he spake / (After long seeming dead) Iago hurt him, / Iago set 
him on." (V.ii.327-29). Indeed, there are several troubling references 
here; the playwright seems in a hurry to get to Othello's closing speech.

Mario A. Di Cesare

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		William Godshalk <
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Date: 		Monday, 23 Oct 2006 17:03:30 -0400
Subject: 17.0939 Roderigo's Fate
Comment: 	Re: SHK 17.0939 Roderigo's Fate

I realize that this will be of little help, but I had the same problem 
some many years ago. I can't remember the source, but I was led to 
believe that Roderigo came back to life after Iago stabbed him. I read 
and reread 5.2 to no avail. Perhaps John Savage will provide us with the 
source for this mistaken resurrection.

Bill

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		John Savage <
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Date: 		Monday, 23 Oct 2006 17:40:16 -0400 (GMT-04:00)
Subject: 17.0939 Roderigo's Fate
Comment: 	Re: SHK 17.0939 Roderigo's Fate

 >Where does he (Roderigo) pop up alive in V.ii?  Nigel Davies

Cassio: "And even but now he spake (after long seeming dead), Iago hurt 
him, Iago set him on."  V.ii.

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Joseph Egert <
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Date: 		Tuesday, 24 Oct 2006 17:53:36 +0000
Subject: 17.0924 Roderigo's Fate
Comment: 	RE: SHK 17.0924 Roderigo's Fate

John Savage asks:

 >Dear SHAKSPER-type persons: Please explain this to me. We know
 >Roderigo is dead by the end of the play. Iago told us (tho he might
 >well be lying) and Lodovico also told us (he would not be lying).
 >But Roderigo pops up, alive, in V.ii, even though it would seem that
 >the rule of tragedy should have had him done away with by the end of
 >the play. Please explain.

Here are the relevant quotes from Honigmann's Arden edition of OTHELLO:

(5.1.61-2)       IAGO: O murd'rous slave! O villain!  [Stabs Roderigo]

(5.1.101-2)     IAGO: He that lies slain here, Cassio,/ Was my dear friend.

(5.1.114)        IAGO: ...and Roderigo dead.

(5.2.105)        EMILIA: O my good lord, yonder's foul murders done!

(5.2.110-2)    EMILIA: Cassio, my lord, hath killed/ A young Venetian 
called Roderigo.

                  OTHELLO: Roderigo killed?

(5.2.305-6) LODOVICO: ...Here's a letter/ Found in the pocket of the 
slain Roderigo...

(5.2.325-7) CASSIO: ...and even but now he spake,/ After long seeming 
dead, Iago hurt him,/ Iago set him on.

  Iago, the master of deceit, is here hoisted with his own 
petard--himself the victim of a "judgment maimed and most imperfect," as 
are all the judgments in a play which asks whether we can ever truly 
know anything or anyone. The confusion was Willfully sown by Iago's creator.

Joe Egert

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