MV Dialog

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 26.311  Wednesday, 2 July 2015

 

From:        John Drakakis <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         June 30, 2015 at 7:15:04 AM EDT

Subject:    RE: SHAKSPER: MV Dialog

 

Re: SHAKSPER: 29 June 2015, MV Dialog

 

Dear Bill,

 

What went over your head has to do with the context in which you excavate particular textual details. In a range of Shakespeare texts, the instability of language becomes a central issue. I see this as having to do with the spread of print culture and the onus that it places on readers to interpret texts. Machiavelli is a key figure in this debate, and thee Prologue to The Jew of Malta is helpful here when Machevil says “I weigh not men and therefore not men’s words”.  Equivocation is an extension of this, and is the means whereby meaning istelf becomes unstable.  This, of course, would be crucial in a culture that had still not forsaken an investment in ‘orality’. The remnant of this in modern popular culture is in the genre of the Western where (a) the hero was always as good as his word - a terrific brief debate in Sam Peckinpah’s ‘The Wild Bunch’ between William Holden and Ernest Borgnine, where Holden defends a decision by saying that he gave his ‘word’. Borgnine’s morally equivocal response is to say that what matters is ‘who you give your word to’ and (b) where the Indians always accused the while man of ‘speaking with forked tongue’. We have no problem with the duplicity of language - our politicians do it all the time. For a culture that still valued the integrity of face-to-face communication this was a serious issue, and the theatre as an ‘oral’ medium foregrounded the problems that it raised.

 

So in MV when Bassanio chooses the leaden casket (after having made a number of denigratory comments about the seductive duplicity of female beauty) he is responding to an issue of moment: nothing is quite what it seems. Shakespeare takes this up again in Othello where the villain says: “I am not what I am”, or in Macbeth: “There is no art to find the mind’s construction in the face”. 

 

The point is that reading a renaissance play isn’t like reading a novel, and the discipline of ‘reading’ in the early modern period (where reading, in this sense was an innovation) is rather different from what we think of as reading. 

 

I hope this helps

 

As Ever

John D

 

 

“Non Nobis” and “Te Deum”

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 26.310  Wednesday, 2 July 2015

 

[1] From:        John Briggs <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

     Date:         June 29, 2015 at 1:05:13 PM EDT

     Subject:    Re: SHAKSPER: Non Nobis 

 

[2] From:        Hannibal Hamlin <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

     Date:         June 29, 2015 at 1:33:45 PM EDT

     Subject:    Re: SHAKSPER: Non Nobis 

 

 

[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------

From:        John Briggs <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         June 29, 2015 at 1:05:13 PM EDT

Subject:    Re: SHAKSPER: Non Nobis

 

Hannibal Hamlin wrote:

 

Even for Catholics, though, the verse “Non nobis, Domine,”

was sometimes considered independently of the Vulgate Psalm 113,

since composers (including William Byrd) set the verse independently.

 

Not exactly - that is somewhere between a non sequitur and circular reasoning. In point of fact, there was never any Catholic liturgical use of “Non nobis, Domine”. Byrd’s setting of the text is being used as evidence that he was a Catholic (which he was, of course) whereas he also set Anglican texts (for Elizabeth’s Chapel Royal) - and that should be seen as the context for his setting.

 

Shakespeare’s use of “Non nobis” in Henry V is either a misunderstanding (by an Anglican) of Hall’s Chronicle, or a deliberate “Anglicanisation” of Hall’s account.

 

John Briggs

 

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------

From:        Hannibal Hamlin <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         June 29, 2015 at 1:33:45 PM EDT

Subject:    Re: SHAKSPER: Non Nobis

 

One other note on the “Non nobis”—Henry V’s call for singing Non nobis and Te Deum is accurate according to Hall and Holinshed. Interestingly, according to Holinshed, Henry “gaue thanks to almightie God for so happie a victorie, causing his prelats and chapleins to sing this psalme: In exitu Israel de Aegypto, and comman|ded euerie man to knéele downe on the ground at this verse: Non nobis Domine, non nobis, sed nomini tuo da gloriam. Which doone, he caused Te Deum, with cer|teine anthems to be soong, giuing land and praise [line 30] to God, without boasting of his owne force or anie humane power.” So what they are singing is actually (in Vulgate numbering, appropriately) Psalm 113, but special emphasis is accorded to “Non nobis,” even though they didn’t recognize it as beginning a new Psalm.

 

Hannibal Hamlin

Professor of English

The Ohio State University 

 

 

Being Viola

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 26.309  Wednesday, 2 July 2015

 

From:        David Frankel <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         July 2, 2015 at 10:45:09 AM EDT

Subject:    Re: SHAKSPER: Being Viola

 

Re: Being Viola

 

I’m a little late replying to this post, as I’ve been away from email for a while, but I just wanted to say how delightful it was to read about this encounter.  Helen Tennison is a marvelous director — she was our BRIT guest director at USF for two years in a row (very unusual).  The first year she directed a ferocious and funny and tragic Titus Andronicus and the second year she lead the students in a devised project — also pretty amazing.  So, if you ever get a chance to see her work, I’d say go.

 

C. David Frankel

Assistant Director of Theatre

School of Theatre and Dance

University of South Florida

email:  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

CFP: SASMARS, Stellenbosch, 26-28 August, 2016

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 26.308  Wednesday, 2 July 2015

 

From:        Leonie Viljoen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         Tuesday, Jun 30, 2015 at 10:55 AM

Subject:    CFP: SASMARS, Stellenbosch, 26-28 August, 2016 

 

Call for Papers

Southern African Society for Medieval and Renaissance Studies Conference 

26 – 28th  August, 2016

 

We are pleased to announce that the 23rd biennial conference of SASMARS will be held at Mont Fleur in Stellenbosch, South Africa on 26 – 28th August 2016.

 

“Texts and Transformations: Medieval and Early Modern Cultures”

Medieval and Early Modern societies weathered various socio-cultural transformations, ranging from economic developments to religious conflicts, across a range of different geographies and in urban and rural spaces.  How did poetry, theatre, prose, visual art, architecture, and other forms of art respond to such changes?  How do we historically understand and assess various kinds of social transitions?

 

Topics for this conference can include but are not limited to:

 

· Adaptions of classical texts and artworks

· Translation of texts and ideas

· Contemporary readings of old texts

· Cross-cultural interactions and influences

· Historical transitions and periodisation

· Religious reform

· Urban renewal and development

· Medieval and Early Modern studies in contemporary education

· Appropriations of Medieval and Early Modern culture

· Cultural responses to economic change

· Representations of political dissent and rebellion

· Utopias and dystopias

· Gender, sexuality, and social change

 

Deadline:  A conference proposal and a short biography to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. by 30 November 2015.  Any inquires can be directed to the same email address.

 

The CFP has been posted to our website at http://sasmarsnewsletter.blogspot.com/

 

Please send other items for the newsletter to me by 12 July.

 

Kind regards

Leonie Viljoen

 

 

 

Shakespeare and Nordic Music (Call for Panel Presenters)

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 26.307  Wednesday, 2 July 2015

 

From:        Michelle Assay <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         June 29, 2015 at 12:44:14 PM EDT

Subject:    Shakespeare and Nordic Music (Call for Panel Presenters)

 

Reminder:

 

Call for Panel Presenters: ‘Shakespeare and Nordic Music’, (deadline for abstracts 1 July, 2015)

 

International Conference 'Shakespeare and Scandinavia', Kingston University, 8-11 October, Kingston-upon-Thames

 

http://blogs.kingston.ac.uk/ssku/calls-for-panel-presenters-deadline-for-abstracts-1-july-2015/

 

From the songs of Christoph Ernst Friedrich Weyse and Peter Arnold Heise to Finnish folk-rock group Apulanta (‘Today Shakespeare was born and died’) Shakespeare has figured in many branches of Nordic music without ever gaining the kind of prominence that major operatic settings accorded him in other European cultural centres. Probably the most significant contribution is Sibelius’s score for The Tempest (1925-26) consisting of more than an hour of some of his finest music. But lesser-known contributions by Sibelius’s compatriot Aulis Sallinen (King Lear opera, 2000), his Danish contemporary Carl Nielsen (incidental music for Shakespeare celebrations, 1916), Norwegian Arne Nordheim (a Tempest ballet in 1979, incidental music to King Lear in 1985, various vocal/ensemble settings with electronic background), and even Grieg (‘Watchman’s Song’ from Macbeth, c. 1867) begin to suggest a more significant picture than has been passed down to us.

 

Papers are invited on any aspect of Shakespeare and Nordic Music, covering all genres, styles and historical periods, and techniques of reworking, not excluding musical responses less concrete than text-settings or tone poems directly on Shakespearean themes. Questions of national temperament may also be addressed: is it mere essentialism to propose, for instance, that Nordic artists are instinctively drawn to those dramas that stress elemental natural forces and emotional bleakness – as the examples cited above would seem to indicate – rather than to, say, Shakespeare’s ‘Southern’ subjects?

 

Panel convenors: Michelle Assay (Universities of Sheffield and Paris Sorbonne) and David Fanning (University of Manchester)

 

Please forward abstracts of no more than 500 words, and a brief bio (2-3 sentences), to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.">This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. and This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.">This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. and This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.">This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. by 1 July, 2015.

 

Michelle Assay

Université Paris Sorbonne, University of Sheffield

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Search

Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.