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An Urgent Query

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 25.442  Wednesday, 12 November 2014

 

From:        Anne Cuneo < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         November 8, 2014 at 2:58:29 AM EST

Subject:    An Urgent Query

 

Dear All,

 

I have a query. My novel about Francis Tregian, the collector of the Fitzwilliam Virginal book, is being translated into English (Title «Tregian's Ground»). 

 

How would one address Francis Tregian, a nobleman without a title: Mister or Master? The translators and I do not agree, and I should like other opinions.

 

Thank you!

 
 
Acting Against the Grain: Non Traditional Shakespeare

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 25.441  Wednesday, 12 November 2014

 

From:        Hardy M. Cook < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         Wednesday, November 12, 2014

Subject:    Acting Against the Grain: Non Traditional Shakespeare

 

The University of Warwick and The Shakespeare Birthplace Trust

Invite you to

Acting Against the Grain: Non Traditional Shakespeare

 

Part of Being Human, the UK's first ever Festival of the Humanities

 

Wolfson Hall, Shakespeare Centre, Henley St., Stratford-upon-Avon, CV37 6QW

 

5.30-7pm Sunday 16 November 2014

 

Bringing together actors and academics from England and the USA who have worked ‘against the grain’: against racial and gender stereotypes, against ingrained habits of casting, and against cultural expectations, to talk about what Shakespeare’s stories and language can tell us about our lives.

 

The event will showcase the work of two University of Warwick projects, Shakespeare on the Road, led by Dr Paul Prescott and Dr Paul Edmondson, and Multicultural Shakespeare in Britain 1930 to 2010 led by Professor Tony Howard. 

 

Panellists will include Nicholas Bailey (currently playing in Macbeth at the Mercury Theatre Colchester) and Kevin Asselin (Artistic Director, Montana Shakespeare in the Parks) with video contributions by Ellen Geer (recently King Lear at Will Geer’s Theatricum Botanicum in California), Debra Ann Byrd (founder of the Harlem Shakespeare Festival, New York) and Lisa Wolpe (founder of the Los Angeles Women’s Shakespeare Company).

 

Places are limited: to confirm your attendance please register at

http://beinghumanfestival.org/event/acting-grain/

 
 
Anglo-Italian Renaissance Studies Series

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 25.440  Wednesday, 12 November 2014

 

From:        Michele Marrapodi < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         November 12, 2014 at 10:47:50 AM EST

Subject:    Anglo-Italian Renaissance Studies Series 

 

Anglo-Italian Renaissance Studies Series - latest publications

 

Dear SHAKSPEReans,

 

I am pleased to announce the publication of the following new books in the Ashgate series “Anglo-Italian Renaissance Studies”:

 

A Bibliographical Catalogue of Italian Books Printed in England 1603–1642, compiled by Soko Tomita and Masahiko Tomita (Farnham: Ashgate, 2014).

 

A sequel to Tomita’s A Bibliographical Catalogue of Italian Books Printed in England 1558-1603, this volume provides the data for the succeeding 40 years (during the reign of King James I and Charles I) and contributes to the study of Anglo-Italian relations in literature through entries on 187 Italian books (335 editions) printed in England. The Catalogue starts with the books published immediately after the death of Queen Elizabeth I on 24 March 1603, and ends in 1642 with the closing of English theatres. It also contains 45 Elizabethan books (75 editions), which did not feature in the previous volume. 

Formatted along the lines of Mary Augusta Scott’s Elizabethan Translations from the Italian (1916), and adopting Philip Gaskell’s scientific method of bibliographical description, this volume provides reliable and comprehensive information about books and their publication, viewed in a general perspective of Anglo-Italian transactions in Jacobean and part of Caroline England.

 

 

Shakespeare and the Italian Renaissance: Appropriation, Transformation, Opposition, edited by Michele Marrapodi (Farnham: Ashgate, 2014).

 

Shakespeare and the Italian Renaissance investigates the works of Shakespeare and his fellow dramatists from within the context of the European Renaissance and, more specifically, from within the context of Italian cultural, dramatic, and literary traditions, with reference to the impact and influence of classical, coeval, and contemporary culture. In contrast to previous studies, the critical perspectives pursued in this volume’s tripartite organization take into account a wider European intertextual dimension and, above all, an ideological interpretation of the ‘aesthetics’ or ‘politics’ of intertextuality. 

Contributors perceive the presence of the Italian world in early modern England not as a traditional treasure trove of influence and imitation, but as a potential cultural force, consonant with complex processes of appropriation, transformation, and ideological opposition through a continuous dialectical interchange of compliance and subversion.

 

 

Best wishes,

Michele Marrapodi

General Editor,

University of Palermo, Italy.

 
 
Conference at UVic in April

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 25.439  Wednesday, 12 November 2014

 

From:        Michael Best < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         October 18, 2014 at 1:52:23 PM EDT

Subject:    Conference at UVic in April

 

Making Links

Texts, Contexts, and Performance in Digital Editions of Early Modern Drama

 

Call for papers and expressions of interest

 

Dates: April 7-­‐8, 2015

 

Location: University of Victoria, BC, Canada

 

This conference will be an opportunity to share ideas about digital editions of early modern drama, and to learn how to mobilize the growing number of digital tools for linking resources. 

 

Sharing ideas 

As well as some sessions of traditional papers, we are planning one or more “slams”: sessions where each presenter is given a maximum of eight minutes to present a problem, an idea, or a thesis of some kind, followed immediately by seven minutes of questions and responses. These sessions have proven immensely useful in providing scholars with immediate feedback on ideas that are still in the process of development. 

 

Using and applying digital tools 

We will also be calling on the expertise of those familiar with digital tools, from the relatively simple to those that are more powerful. This gathering will be a great   opportunity to learn about the many digital resources that are available to the modern scholar, including those developed at the University of Victoria for the Internet Shakespeare Editions; its associated websites, Digital Renaissance Editions and the Queen's Men Editions; and collaborating project, The Map of Early Modern London. 

 

Workshops will focus on strategies for linking texts within these sites to each other, to supporting materials in many media, and to the growing number of stable scholarly sites on the web. 

 

Submitting a proposal 

Please submit the following information by December 15, 2014 to This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

Title of paper/presentation 

 

Abstract (150-­‐250 words for a paper, 100-­‐150 words for a short, "slam," presentation) Your name and institution 

 

Bio-­‐bibliographical note 

 

 

Online registration will open in early January. We look forward to seeing you in Victoria in the spring of 2015. 

 

Michael Best, Janelle Jenstad, and Erin Kelly. 

Conference Website: http://internetshakespeare.uvic.ca/Annex/Victoria2015

 

Michael Best

Coordinating Editor, Internet Shakespeare Editions

Janelle Jenstad

Assistant Coordinating Editor, Internet Shakespeare Editions

Erin Kelly

<http://internetshakespeare.uvic.ca/>

Department of English, University of Victoria

Victoria B.C. V8W 3W1, Canada.

 

 
Mellon Fellowships in Critical Bibliography at Rare Book School

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 25.438  Wednesday, 12 November 2014

 

From:        Donna A.Sy < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         October 8, 2014 at 11:29:09 AM EDT

Subject:    Mellon Fellowships in Critical Bibliography at Rare Book School

 

Rare Book School (RBS) at the University of Virginia welcomes applications from scholars of Shakespeare to the Andrew W. Mellon Fellowship of Scholars in Critical Bibliography.  The aim of this Mellon Foundation-funded fellowship program is to reinvigorate bibliographical studies within the humanities by introducing doctoral candidates, postdoctoral fellows, and junior faculty to specialized skills, methods, and professional networks for conducting advanced research with material texts. RBS selected forty Mellon Fellows in 2013 and 2014, and will admit an additional twenty fellows to the program in the spring of 2015.

 

Fellows will receive funding for RBS course attendance, as well as generous stipends, and support for research-related travel to special collections, over the course of three years. Weeklong intensive courses at RBS cover topics such as paleography, codicology, scholarly editing, and the history of the book.

 

The deadline for application to the program is MONDAY 1 DECEMBER 2014. Applicants must be doctoral candidates (post-qualifying exams or other requirements), postdoctoral fellows, or junior (untenured) faculty in the humanities at a U.S. institution at time of application. For more details, please visit:

http://www.rarebookschool.org/fellowships/mellon

 

Donna A. C. Sy

Mellon Fellowship Program Director

Rare Book School

at the University of Virginia

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

(434) 243-4296

 

---

 

RARE BOOK SCHOOL RECEIVES MELLON FOUNDATION GRANT TO SUPPORT FELLOWSHIPS IN CRITICAL BIBLIOGRAPHY

 

Fellowship program seeks to reinvigorate bibliographical studies within the humanities

 

Charlottesville, VA, October 1, 2014 – Rare Book School (RBS) at the University of Virginia has been awarded a $757,000 grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to extend and augment its three-year fellowship program, the Andrew W. Mellon Fellowship of Scholars in Critical Bibliography, established in 2012 through funding from the Foundation. The aim of the program is to reinvigorate bibliographical studies within the humanities. Forty fellows currently participate in the program; RBS will name an additional twenty fellows in the spring of 2015.

 

The Mellon Fellowships at Rare Book School enable a select group of doctoral candidates, postdoctoral fellows, and junior faculty in the humanities to receive advanced, intensive training in the analysis of textual artifacts. Led by a distinguished faculty drawn from the bibliographical community and professionals in allied fields, fellows will attend annual research-oriented seminars at Rare Book School and at major special collections libraries nationwide. Fellows will also receive stipends to support research-related travel to special collections, and additional funds to host academic symposia at their home institutions.  

 

“Rare Book School's Mellon Fellows work on a remarkable variety of materials, including ancient graffiti buried at Herculaneum, medieval Italian song manuscripts, Japanese textbooks from the Age of Discovery, and ‘viral’ news clips from 19th-century America. Over the past two years, they have shared fresh perspectives with their colleagues in the program, and with the greater bibliographical and academic communities,” said RBS Director Michael F. Suarez, S.J. “We are profoundly grateful for all that the Foundation's support has made possible through this program, and we trust that the fellows’ achievements and collaborations will continue to enrich humanities scholarship.”

 

The deadline for application to join the program’s third cohort of fellows is December 1, 2014. More information about the Andrew W. Mellon Fellowship of Scholars in Critical Bibliography is available at: 

http://www.rarebookschool.org/fellowships/mellon

 

About Rare Book School (RBS)

Rare Book School provides continuing-education opportunities for students from all disciplines and levels to study the history of written, printed, and born-digital materials with leading scholars and professionals in the fields of bibliography, librarianship, book history, manuscript studies, and the digital humanities. Founded in 1983, RBS moved to its present home at the University of Virginia in 1992. RBS is a not-for-profit educational organization affiliated with the University of Virginia. More information about RBS is available on its website: http://www.rarebookschool.org

 

For more information, contact:

Jeremy Dibbell, Director of Communications & Outreach

Rare Book School

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

(434) 243-7077

 
 
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