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Richard III’s Remains Positively Identified

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 24.0046  Tuesday, 5 February 2013

 

[1] From:        Bo Bergstrom < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

     Date:         February 4, 2013 5:56:14 PM EST

     Subject:     Richard III: Final Report

 

[2] From:        Hardy M. Cook < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

     Date:         Tuesday, February 5, 2013

     Subject:     Richard III’s Remains Positively Identified

 

 

[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------

From:        Bo Bergstrom < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         February 4, 2013 5:56:14 PM EST

Subject:     Richard III: Final Report

 

New York Times story on Richard III Identification

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/02/05/world/europe/richard-the-third-bones.html?src=me&ref=general

 

 --Best regards, Bo.

 

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------

From:        Hardy M. Cook < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         Tuesday, February 5, 2013

Subject:     Richard III’s Remains Positively Identified

 

I intended to post on the identification of Richard III’s remains anyway.

 

In addition to the New York Times story other links are below.

 

University of Leicester’s Richard III Page

http://www.le.ac.uk/richardiii/

 

NPR

http://www.npr.org/blogs/thetwo-way/2013/02/04/171043924/royal-recovery-remains-idd-as-those-of-king-richard-iii

 

BBC

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-leicestershire-21063882

4 February 2013 

 

Richard III dig: DNA confirms bones are king’s

 

A skeleton found beneath a Leicester car park has been confirmed as that of English king Richard III.

 

Experts from the University of Leicester said DNA from the bones matched that of descendants of the monarch’s family.

 

Lead archaeologist Richard Buckley, from the University of Leicester, told a press conference to applause: “Beyond reasonable doubt it’s Richard.”

 

Richard, killed in battle in 1485, will be reinterred in Leicester Cathedral.

 

Mr Buckley said the bones had been subjected to “rigorous academic study” and had been carbon dated to a period from 1455-1540.

 

Dr Jo Appleby, an osteo-archaeologist from the university’s School of Archaeology and Ancient History, revealed the bones were of a man in his late 20s or early 30s. Richard was 32 when he died.

 

His skeleton had suffered 10 injuries, including eight to the skull, at around the time of death. Two of the skull wounds were potentially fatal.

 

[ . . . ]

 

Richard III was portrayed as deformed by some Tudor historians and indeed the skeleton’s spine is badly curved, a condition known as scoliosis.

 

However, there was no trace of a withered arm or other abnormalities described in the more extreme characterisations of the king.

 

[ . . . ]

 

Dr Appleby said: “The analysis of the skeleton proved that it was an adult male but was an unusually slender, almost feminine, build for a man. “Taken as a whole, the skeletal evidence provides a highly convincing case for identification as Richard III.”

 

[ . . . ]

 

 

New York Times

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/02/05/world/europe/richard-the-third-bones.html

 

Bones Under Parking Lot Belonged to Richard III

By John F. Burns

 

LEICESTER, England — Until it was discovered beneath a city parking lot last fall, the skeleton had lain unmarked, and unmourned, for more than 500 years. Friars fearful of the men who slew him in battle buried the man in haste, naked and anonymous, without a winding sheet, rings or personal adornments of any kind, in a space so cramped his cloven skull was jammed upright and askew against the head of his shallow grave.

 

On Monday, confirming what many historians and archaeologists had suspected, a team of experts at the University of Leicester concluded on the basis of DNA and other evidence that the skeletal remains were those of King Richard III, for centuries the most reviled of English monarchs. But the conclusion, said to have been reached “beyond any reasonable doubt,” promised to achieve much more than an end to the oblivion that has been Richard’s fate since his death on Aug. 22, 1485, at the Battle of Bosworth Field, 20 miles from this ancient city in the sheep country of England’s East Midlands.

 

Among those who found his remains, there is a passionate belief that new attention drawn to Richard by the discovery will inspire a reappraisal that could rehabilitate the medieval king and show him to be a man with a strong sympathy for the rights of the common man, who was deeply wronged by his vengeful Tudor successors. Far from the villainous character memorialized in English histories, films and novels, far from Shakespeare’s damning representation of him as the limping, withered, haunted murderer of his two princely nephews, Richard III can become the subject of a new age of scholarship and popular reappraisal, these enthusiasts believe.

 

[ . . . ]

 

Richard Taylor, the University of Leicester official who served as a coordinator for the project, said the last piece of the scientific puzzle fell into place with DNA findings that became available on Sunday, five months after the skeletal remains were uncovered. At that point, he said, members of the team knew that they had achieved something historic.

 

“We knew then, beyond reasonable doubt, that this was Richard III,” Mr. Taylor said. “We’re certain now, as certain as you can be of anything in life.”

 

The team’s leading geneticist, Turi King, said at a news conference that DNA samples from two modern-day descendants of Richard III’s family had provided a match with samples taken from the skeleton found in the priory ruins. Kevin Schurer, a historian and demographer, tracked down two living descendants of Anne of York, Richard III’s sister, one of them a London-based, Canadian-born furniture maker, Michael Ibsen, 55, and the other a second cousin of Mr. Ibsen’s who has requested anonymity.

 

Dr. King said tests conducted at three laboratories in England and France had found that the descendants’ mitochondrial DNA, a genetic element inherited through the maternal line of descent, matched that extracted from the parking lot skeleton. She said all three samples belonged to a type of mitochondrial DNA that is carried by only 1 to 2 percent of the English population, a rare enough group to satisfy the project team, pending more work on the samples, that a match had been found.

 

[ . . . ]

 

 

Washington Post

http://www.washingtonpost.com/world/europe/remains-of-king-richard-iii-identified/2013/02/04/d79e87b2-6ebb-11e2-ac36-3d8d9dcaa2e2_story.html

 

‘Beyond reasonable doubt,’ bones are the remains of England’s King Richard III

By Eliza Mackintosh,

 

LONDON — A team of archaeologists confirmed Monday that ancient remains found under a parking lot belong to long-lost King Richard III, successfully ending a search that sparked a modern-day debate about the legacy of the reputed tyrant.

 

Details of the findings were released hours after DNA tests came in late Sunday. The 500-year-old remains were discovered five months ago, using ancient maps and records to uncover the ruins of the old friary where Richard III was laid to rest.

 

“It is the academic conclusion of the University of Leicester that beyond reasonable doubt, the individual exhumed at Greyfriars in September 2012 is indeed Richard III, the last Plantagenet king of England,” Richard Buckley, lead archaeologist of the University of Leicester, said at the announcement Monday in the city 90 miles northwest of London.

 

[ . . . ]

 

 

Independent 

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/home-news/now-we-can-see-his-face-the-next-step-of-the-richard-iii-discovery-story-8480958.html

 

Now we can see his face: the next step of the Richard III discovery story

 

Facial reconstruction is based on the skull found under a car park in Leicester

 

Steve Connor

Tuesday, 5 February 2013

 

The “face” of King Richard III has finally emerged more than 500 years after his death at the hands of Henry Tudor’s army thanks to advanced computer scanning, fancy wax modelling and a little bit of artistic licence.

 

The facial reconstruction is based on the skull found under a car park in Leicester and was put together by Caroline Wilkinson, professor of craniofacial identification at Dundee University, an expert in building up three-dimensional fleshy models based on bone structure.

 

All known portraits of Richard III were painted after his death and do not show him in a particularly flattering light, which suited the Tudor’s dynasty’s portrayal of him as one of the great villains of history.

 

Professor Wilkinson made the model by first digitising a three-dimensional image of the complete skull and using the bone structure to estimate the thickness of the various layers of soft tissues which make up the face.

 

[ . . . ]

 

 

Richard III’s Skeleton: icon Richard III Skeleton

 

Richard III Facial Reconstruction: icon Richard III Facial Reconstruction

 

 

©2011 Hardy Cook. All rights reserved.