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Desdemona Unpinning

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 24.0301  Wednesday, 19 June 2013

 

[1] From:        Peter Holland < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

     Date:         June 19, 2013 3:47:24 AM EDT

     Subject:     RE: SHAKSPER: Desdemona Unpinning 

 

[2] From:        Nick Ranson < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

     Date:         June 19, 2013 9:26:04 AM EDT

     Subject:     Re: SHAKSPER: Desdemona Unpinning 

 

 

[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------

From:        Peter Holland < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         June 19, 2013 3:47:24 AM EDT

Subject:     RE: SHAKSPER: Desdemona Unpinning

 

Can I recommend Carol Rutter’s superb work on unpinning? There’s a fascinating series of videos at http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/fac/cross_fac/capital/teaching_and_learning/projects/unpinning/ that explores with actors how different kinds of clothing might be removed and how this affects the differences between Q and F for the scene. As the headnote for the films states:

 

“The project records practical experiments conducted on the stages of Shakespeare’s (reconstructed) Globe using reconstructions of early modern dress to argue that the scene’s “meaning” resides in the undressing and to demonstrate how that undressing was done. …This work illustrates an article by Carol Chillington Rutter, ‘Unpinning Desdemona (Again) or “Who would be toll’d with Wenches in a shew?”’ published in Shakespeare Bulletin 28:1, Spring 2010, pp. 111-132 responding to Denise A. Walens’ ‘Unpinning Desdemona’, Shakespeare Quarterly, 58:4 Winter, 2007, pp. 487-508.”

 

And, by the way, Scott, please note that ‘nightgown’ is not equivalent to the modern sense of something one wears in bed. OED gives no earlier citation than 1824 for that sense. In the early modern period the sense is OED 1: “A loose gown usually worn over nightclothes; a loose informal robe worn by men; a dressing gown.”  This also affects our understanding (or rather the widespread misunderstanding) of the stage direction in Hamlet Q1: “Enter the ghost in his night gowne.”

 

Peter Holland

 

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------

From:        Nick Ranson < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         June 19, 2013 9:26:04 AM EDT

Subject:     Re: SHAKSPER: Desdemona Unpinning 

 

Her hair, not her nightgown?

 
 

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