Subscribe to Our Feeds

Current Postings RSS

Announcements RSS

Home :: Current Postings ::
Whedon’s Much Ado Review

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 24.0321  Monday, 8 July 2013

 

[1] From:        Ellen Moody < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

     Date:         June 26, 2013 12:39:21 PM EDT

     Subject:     Whedon’s Much Ado 

 

[2] From:        Stanley Wells < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

     Date:         June 26, 2013 2:45:34 PM EDT

     Subject:     Re: SHAKSPER: Whedon’s Much Ado Review 

 

 

[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------

From:        Ellen Moody < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         June 26, 2013 12:39:21 PM EDT

Subject:     Whedon’s Much Ado

 

In response to J.D. Markel, I found all the stills I used on the Net. I’ve learned it’s not common for average viewers to try for stills of landscapes or houses or far shots of any kind so one has to capture them oneself. I do that when I am studying a film and go to the trouble of renting a DVD or buying one. Sometimes I find them in a book published by the film-maker. What’s popular are shots of the stars and many of the Making of type books offer few far shots and stills either.  It’s very frustrating.

 

The last one in this particular blog is one I found on a site that asserted it was from the film. I don’t remember the individual shots that clearly, only that they were very picturesque, deep and angular, often looking down from the house, but there were several far shots which gave the impression of a vast estate. This reminded me of Loren Mazel’s Castleton estate in mid-Virginia. Mid-Virginia is much cheaper than LA and I doubted Whedon has that much money but I reproduced the still as at least giving a sense that landscape is important in the film. If it is in fact not in the film (as I couldn’t tell whether it was), I’ll leave it as I think Whedon wanted the view to think we were in this sort of never-never land of contemporary (maybe Hollywood) wealth

 

Ellen

 

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------

From:        Stanley Wells < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         June 26, 2013 2:45:34 PM EDT

Subject:     Re: SHAKSPER: Whedon’s Much Ado Review

 

I can’t recommend that film to anyone who cares for language.  

 
 

©2011 Hardy Cook. All rights reserved.