CFP: Shakespeare across Media

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 23.013  Monday, 16 January 2012

 

From:         Beatrice Lei <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         January 15, 2012 3:46:07 AM EST

Subject:      CFP: Shakespeare across Media

 

Call for Papers: Shakespeare across Media

6th Conference of the NTU Shakespeare Forum

 

The National Taiwan University Shakespeare Forum will host its sixth conference, “Shakespeare across Media,” in Taipei on June 7-9, 2012. 

 

Keynote speakers include Russell Jackson (Allardyce Nicoll Chair in Drama, University of Birmingham), Diana Henderson (Professor of Literature and Dean for Curriculum and Faculty Support, Massachusetts Institute of Technology), and Ching-Hsi Perng (Distinguished Professor Emeritus, National Taiwan University).  Alexander C. Y. Huang (George Washington University; Co-Director of Global Shakespeares: Video and Performance Archive) and Yong Li Lan (National University of Singapore; Director of A|S||I|A: Asian Shakespeare Intercultural Archive), along with Japanese and Korean co-directors of A|S||I|A, will offer plenary sessions and hand-on workshops on digital archives.  Taiwan Bangzi Company will present a Chinese opera adaptation of Measure for Measure at the National Theatre and offer post-performance discussion.  There will also be screening of the latest Shakespearean films.  Conference participants can also join the post-conference tours on June 9 and 10 at their own expenses. 

 

Proposals for 20-minute papers are invited on any aspect of the conference theme.  Topics may include, but are not restricted to: radio, film, television, animation, manga, games, multimedia staging, e-books, children’s books, digital archives, YouTube, Second Life, social networking websites, mobile phone applications, and cross-genre adaptation and translation.  Graduate students are invited to apply to present at the pre-conference graduate sessions.

 

Please send a 250-word abstract and a short bio by February 15, 2012.  If accepted for presentation, completed papers must be submitted by May 15.  To facilitate discussion among international scholars, papers in English are preferred.  For submissions and queries please contact Bi-qi Beatrice Lei at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..  Updates can be found on www.shakespeare.tw.

 

Folger Exhibition: The King James Bible

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 23.015  Friday, 13 January 2012

 

From:         Hannibal Hamlin <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         January 12, 2012 3:52:07 PM EST

Subject:      Re: KJ Bible

 

Thanks to Hardy both for the notice and for the kind words. The exhibition at the Folger closes Jan. 16, alas. (We're now into 2012, which is, unmomentously, the 401st anniversary of the KJV.) The Manifold Greatness website will remain a permanent resource, however, accessible through the Folger site (or directly). And I encourage anyone within reach of the traveling panel shows to visit the host sites. The institutions involved are planning all sorts of supplementary displays and events, focusing on everything from Family Bibles to the KJV and Mormonism. The next three sites are the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis (http://blog.lib.umn.edu/lib-web/events/university-libraries-exhibits/400th-anniversary-of-the-king-james-bible.html), William Carey University in Hattiesburg, Mississippi(http://www.wmcarey.edu/news/1/653/WCUtoHostExhibitCele.shtm), and the University of Texas Brownsville. The Harry Ransom Center at the University of Texas Austin will be mounting yet another version of the exhibition, combining loans from the Folger and elsewhere with gems from its own rich collections (http://www.hrc.utexas.edu/exhibitions/upcoming/). The road leads ever on . . . .

 

There's also a blog attached to the website. Hardy provided some links, but here's another, on the perennially irritating myth of Shakespeare and the KJV:

 

http://manifoldgreatness.wordpress.com/2011/04/22/shakespeare-did-not-write-the-king-james-bible-no-way-no-how/

 

All the best,

Hannibal

 

Reformation, Vol. 16

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 23.014  Friday, 13 January 2012

 

From:         Colleen E. Kennedy <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         January 12, 2012 9:07:06 PM EST

Subject:      Re: SHAKSPER: Reformation

 

I am so sorry but I have been informed that the link didn't work for my earlier posting. I have repasted the message with the correct link below.

 

Thank you,

Colleen Kennedy

 

[Editor’s Note: I have corrected the copy in the SHAKSPER archive and in the Announcements section of the SHAKSPER web site. Remember when you send your announcements to SHAKSPER, they are distributed to the subscribers, archived at the web site, and included in the Announcements section of the site. –Hardy]

 

[Apologies for cross-posting]

 

I am pleased to announce the publication of Reformation, vol. 16 (2011). The online edition is available now (http://www.equinoxjournals.com/REFORMATION/issue/current), and printed copies will be available shortly.

 

Hannibal

 

Reformation 16 (2011)

 

Articles:

 

Paul Dustin Stegner, “Treasonous Reconciliations: Robert Southwell, Religious Polemic, and the Criminalization of Confession”

 

Kat Lecky, “Milton’s Lydgate: A New Perspective on the Nativity Ode”

 

Jack Patrick Cunningham, “Changing Fashions: The Coming of Reformation in Iceland”

 

Sophie Isabella Gray, “Tyndale and the Text in the Heart”

 

Bracy V. Hill II, “‘Faithful Accounts’?: The Hampton Court Conference and the King James

 

Bible in Eighteenth-Century Dissenting Histories”

 

Grace Tiffany, “Shakespeare's Parables”

 

 

Review Articles:

 

Stephen Bowd, “Religious Reform in Sixteenth-Century Italy”

 

Kenneth Austin, “Jews and Christians in Early Modern Europe”

 

 

Reviews:

 

Matthew Milner, Review of The Reformation of Feeling, by Susan C. Karant-Nunn (Oxford University Press, 2010).

 

John N. King, Review of The Book in the Renaissance, by Andrew Pettegree (Yale University Press, 2010).

 

Sylvia Gill, Review of The Senses and the English Reformation, by Matthew Milner (Ashgate, 2011).

 

Bridget Heal, Review of Ideas and Cultural Margins in Early Modern Germany, ed. Marjorie E. Plummer and Robin B. Barnes (Ashgate, 2009).

 

Janet Dickinson, Review of Elizabeth I: Translations, ed. Janel Mueller and Joshua Scodel (University of Chicago Press, 2009).

 

Peter Webster, Review of Music and Society in Early Modern England, by Christopher Marsh (Cambridge University Press, 2010).

 

Esther Mijers, Review of Women, Religion, and the Atlantic World, 1600–1800, ed. Daniella Kostroun and Lisa Vollendorf (University of Toronto Press, 2009).

 

Hannibal Hamlin

Associate Professor of English

Editor, Reformation

Co-curator, Manifold Greatness: The Creation and Afterlife of the King James Bible

http://www.manifoldgreatness.org/

The Ohio State University

Columbus, OH 43210-1340

 

Reformation, Vol. 16

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 23.014  Friday, 13 January 2012

 

From:         Colleen E. Kennedy <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         January 12, 2012 9:07:06 PM EST

Subject:      Re: SHAKSPER: Reformation

 

I am so sorry but I have been informed that the link didn't work for my earlier posting. I have repasted the message with the correct link below.

 

Thank you,

Colleen Kennedy

 

[Editor’s Note: I have corrected the copy in the SHAKSPER archive and in the Announcements section of the SHAKSPER web site. Remember when you send your announcements to SHAKSPER, they are distributed to the subscribers, archived at the web site, and included in the Announcements section of the site. –Hardy]

 

[Apologies for cross-posting]

 

I am pleased to announce the publication of Reformation, vol. 16 (2011). The online edition is available now (http://www.equinoxjournals.com/REFORMATION/issue/current), and printed copies will be available shortly.

 

Hannibal

 

Reformation 16 (2011)

 

Articles:

 

Paul Dustin Stegner, “Treasonous Reconciliations: Robert Southwell, Religious Polemic, and the Criminalization of Confession”

 

Kat Lecky, “Milton’s Lydgate: A New Perspective on the Nativity Ode”

 

Jack Patrick Cunningham, “Changing Fashions: The Coming of Reformation in Iceland”

 

Sophie Isabella Gray, “Tyndale and the Text in the Heart”

 

Bracy V. Hill II, “‘Faithful Accounts’?: The Hampton Court Conference and the King James

 

Bible in Eighteenth-Century Dissenting Histories”

 

Grace Tiffany, “Shakespeare's Parables”

 

 

Review Articles:

 

Stephen Bowd, “Religious Reform in Sixteenth-Century Italy”

 

Kenneth Austin, “Jews and Christians in Early Modern Europe”

 

 

Reviews:

 

Matthew Milner, Review of The Reformation of Feeling, by Susan C. Karant-Nunn (Oxford University Press, 2010).

 

John N. King, Review of The Book in the Renaissance, by Andrew Pettegree (Yale University Press, 2010).

 

Sylvia Gill, Review of The Senses and the English Reformation, by Matthew Milner (Ashgate, 2011).

 

Bridget Heal, Review of Ideas and Cultural Margins in Early Modern Germany, ed. Marjorie E. Plummer and Robin B. Barnes (Ashgate, 2009).

 

Janet Dickinson, Review of Elizabeth I: Translations, ed. Janel Mueller and Joshua Scodel (University of Chicago Press, 2009).

 

Peter Webster, Review of Music and Society in Early Modern England, by Christopher Marsh (Cambridge University Press, 2010).

 

Esther Mijers, Review of Women, Religion, and the Atlantic World, 1600–1800, ed. Daniella Kostroun and Lisa Vollendorf (University of Toronto Press, 2009).

 

Hannibal Hamlin

Associate Professor of English

Editor, Reformation

Co-curator, Manifold Greatness: The Creation and Afterlife of the King James Bible

http://www.manifoldgreatness.org/

The Ohio State University

Columbus, OH 43210-1340

 

Queen Lear?

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 23.013  Thursday, 12 January 2012

 

From:         Joseph Egert <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         January 9, 2012 5:23:04 PM EST

Subject:     Queen Lear?

 

Here's Meryl Streep on her role as Iron Maggie:

 

"We're not interested in King Lear's politics. We're not saying we would have voted for him... What interested me was [playing] the part of someone who does monstrous things maybe, or misguided things."

 

 

http://frontpagemag.com/2012/01/09/a-king-lear-for-girls/

 

Joe Egert

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