Theatre in Stratford-upon-Avon 1597

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 23.037  Tuesday, 31 January 2012

 

From:         Sylvia Morris <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         January 31, 2012 6:26:21 AM EST

Subject:     Theatre in Stratford-upon-Avon 1597

 

Historian Dr Robert Bearman has uncovered a long-lost snippet of information about Stratford-upon-Avon performances in Shakespeare’s lifetime. His report is the latest post of The Shakespeare blog, http://theshakespeareblog.com/2012/01/how-chances-it-they-travel-players-in-stratford-upon-avon/

 

Berman writes in part, “ . . . I recently stumbled more or less by chance on the names of three travelling companies of players who visited Stratford in the summer of 1597, the year Shakespeare bought New Place. These visits were already on record in outline form and have been known about for some time: for Stratford’s chamberlain, in his accounts for that year, had included a payment of 19s 4d to reimburse the bailiff, Abraham Sturley for money he had laid out ‘for foure companyes of players’. But on the back of a bill (still extant in the borough archives) which formed another item in the accounts, I found that Sturley had jotted down further details of these playing companies, principally ‘the Queens plairs’, who were given 10 shillings on 16 and 17 July. He then adds, more scruffily and in a different ink, the names of two other troupes, ‘Therle of Darbies’ and ‘mi Ld Ogles’, though not specifying the payments received. . . .”

 

Sylvia Morris

www.theshakespeareblog.com

Twitter:  @sylvmorris1

Wooden O Symposium, August 6-8, 2012

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 23.036  Tuesday, 31 January 2012

 

From:         Matt Nickerson <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         January 31, 2012 10:03:17 AM EST

Subject:     Wooden O Symposium, August 6-8, 2012

 

I believe this conference will be of interest to readers of SHAKSPER

 

WOODEN O SYMPOSIUM

Utah Shakespeare Festival -- Center for Shakespeare Studies

August 6-8, 2012 -- Cedar City, Utah

 

The 2012 Wooden O Symposium is a cross-disciplinary conference sponsored by Southern Utah University’s Center for Shakespeare Studies and the Utah Shakespeare Festival, located in Cedar City, Utah. August 6-8, 2012. Scholars attending the conference will have the unique opportunity of immersing themselves in research and performance in one of the most beautiful natural settings in the western United States.

 

Conference Priorities: The Wooden O Symposium invites papers on any topic related to Shakespeare, including Shakespeare in performance, the adaptation of Shakespeare works (film, fiction, and visual and performing arts), Elizabethan and Jacobean culture and history, and Shakespeare’s contemporaries, but gives priority to presentations relating to the Utah Shakespeare Festival’s 2012 season: Titus Andronicus, The Merry Wives of Windsor, and Hamlet.  Because USF will also be producing Moliere’s Scapin and Fredrich Schiller’s Mary Stuart in their 2012 summer season, we also welcome essays on these plays, as well as presentations that address the subject of early modern drama throughout Europe and representations of female monarchs in dramatic literature.

 

Keynote Speaker: The keynote speaker for the 2012 Wooden O Symposium is Dr. Susan Frye, Professor of English at University of Wyoming, and author of Elizabeth I: The Competition for Representation (Oxford, 1996), Pens and Needles: Women’s Textualities in Early Modern England (UPenn, 2010), and co-editor with of Maids and Mistresses, Cousins and Queens: Women’s Alliances in Early Modern England (Oxford, 1999.)

 

In support of Southern Utah University’s mission to promote undergraduate research, the Wooden O Symposium regularly includes undergraduate panels as part of our program, so please share this notice with your undergraduates.

 

We will also invite presenters to submit revised papers from the 2012 symposium to our peer-reviewed Journal of the Wooden O.

 

Submission: Deadline for proposals is May 1, 2012. Session chairs and individual presenters will be informed of acceptance no later than May 15.  250-word abstracts or session proposals (including individual abstracts) should include the following:

  • Author’s name
  • Participant category (faculty, graduate student, undergraduate, independent scholar)
  • Mailing address
  • College/university affiliation (if any)
  • E-mail address
  • Daytime phone number. 

Send 250 word abstract or session proposal to: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

Wooden O Symposium

c/o Utah Shakespeare Festival

351 W. Center St.

Cedar City, UT 84720

Pacific Northwest Renaissance Studies October 18-21, 2012

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 23.035  Tuesday, 31 January 2012

 

From:         Melissa Walter <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         January 30, 2012 5:09:13 PM EST

Subject:     Pacific Northwest Renaissance Studies October 18-21, 2012

 

CFP: Renaissance Translation and Transmission (October 18-21, 2012)

The Pacific Northwest Renaissance Society

The Pacific Northwest Renaissance Society invites papers examining all aspects of translation and transmission in and of the Renaissance for its conference to be held from October 18th to 21st, 2012 in Abbotsford, British Columbia, sponsored by the University of the Fraser Valley. Papers might consider, for instance,

  • the art / practice of textual translation and transmission in the Renaissance
  • cross-cultural communication in the Renaissance 
  • “translation” between and across genres and media (theatre, visual arts, music, literature, etc.) and across specialized discourses (for instance from the medical to the political) 
  • the political and ethical implications of translation in and of the early modern period
  • endangered languages and translation in the Renaissance
  • physical acts of translation, such as the remaking of new clothes from old clothes, or other forms of material translation / “carrying across” or transformation
  • the "translation" and “transmission” of early modern texts in manuscript, print and electronic media from the late sixteenth-century onward 
  • translating, transmitting, and teaching the Renaissance in the (post)modern classroom
  • diaspora and translation in the early modern period
  • “translating” and/or “transmitting” the Renaissance in the digital age
  • the untranslatable Renaissance/early modern untranslatabilty
  • mistranslation in (and of) the Renaissance
  • translation and interpretive authority in the Renaissance

Multi-media presentations and traditional papers in the fine arts, the humanities, and the social sciences are encouraged.


Abstracts for individual papers and proposals for three-paper panels are invited.

 

Abstracts should run 250 words for papers of 20-minute delivery length.

 

Panel proposals must include abstracts for all three papers.

 

Deadline: July 15, 2012

 

Acceptances will be sent by August 15, 2012.

 

Submissions should be sent to:

 

Melissa Walter

UFV Department of English

33844 King Road

Abbotsford, BC 

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

For more information see: www.pnrs.org

PIPA/SOPA

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 23.034  Monday, 30 January 2012

 

[1] From:         Gabriel Egan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

     Date:         January 29, 2012 12:49:18 PM EST

     Subject:     Re: SHAKSPER: PIPA/SOPA 

 

[2] From:         Larry Weiss <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

     Date:         January 29, 2012 8:52:06 PM EST

     Subject:     Re: SHAKSPER: PIPA/SOPA 

 

 

[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------

From:         Gabriel Egan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         January 29, 2012 12:49:18 PM EST

Subject:     Re: SHAKSPER: PIPA/SOPA

 

Larry Weiss thinks that

 

>The scope of copyright protection (although

>not its duration) is the same it was when the

>current Act was adopted in 1976 and pretty much

>the same as it was under the prior law,

>enacted in 1909.

 

This comment is contradicted by the judgement in “Bridgeman Art Library v. Corel Corp.” (1999), which established that in the US a photograph of an artwork is not itself a new work that enjoys copyright.

 

The Digital Millennium Copyright Act (1998), on the other hand, criminalizes the circumvention of digital locks for the purpose of accessing locked material even when that material itself enjoys no copyright protection.

 

So, the situation has changed substantially since 1909.

 

In case anyone thinks that all this has little bearing on Shakespearian scholarship, I’ll mention just one relevant application. EEBO images derived from microfilms of books in the Huntington Library retain the library’s assertion of its rights over those images. The validity of that assertion depends upon complex judgements about the amount of creativity embedded in microfilm reproduction and subsequent digitization.

 

Far from being the settled matter Weiss thinks it is, copyright law is the battleground upon which is being fought, right now, the contest for the world’s cultural heritage.

 

Gabriel Egan

 

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------

From:         Larry Weiss <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         January 29, 2012 8:52:06 PM EST

Subject:     Re: SHAKSPER: PIPA/SOPA

 

>I might point out that things previously unthinkable are now commonplace 

>in post-9/11 America. Maybe if SOPA/PIPA fails of passage the 

>government will use another method with which it has already had such 

>great success: the CIA tracks down the offenders and the president 

>orders them killed.  

 

We all know that has happened; but I wonder which of the deaths Bob Projansky prefers not have occurred -- bin Laden? Awaki?

PIPA/SOPA

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 23.033  Sunday, 29 January 2012

 

[1] From:         Larry Weiss <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

     Date:         January 27, 2012 9:44:10 PM EST

     Subject:     Re: SHAKSPER: PIPA/SOPA 

 

[2] From:         Robert Projansky <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

     Date:         January 27, 2012 6:38:37 PM EST

     Subject:     Re: PIPA/SOPA 

 

 

[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------

From:         Larry Weiss <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         January 27, 2012 9:44:10 PM EST

Subject:     Re: SHAKSPER: PIPA/SOPA

 

Jim Marino says:

 

And while Larry Weiss seems to sniff at Gabriel Egan as a copyright violator, surely it should be acknowledged that the scope of what is “protected” by copyright has grown enormously in the recent past, and the domain protected by fair use has correspondingly shrunk, driven in almost every case by the agenda of deep-pocketed plaintiffs. Copyright piracy is not what it used to be; rather, it is now a great many more things than it used to be. That expansion of property rights has been defined by what one set of parties, the owners, decide to be reasonable. PIPA/SOPA would enforce those parties’ opinions of their own deserts with the full power of the law. That, surely, is unreasonable.

 

This most assuredly is not the case.  The scope of copyright protection (although not its duration) is the same it was when the current Act was adopted in 1976 and pretty much the same as it was under the prior law, enacted in 1909.  As for restriction of fair use, I would appreciate citations to whatever cases supposedly support this notion.  My impression is that cases like the U.S. Supreme Court’s unanimous decision in Campbell v. Acuff-Rose Music, 510 U.S. 569 (1994), expands the doctrine.

 

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------

From:         Robert Projansky <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         January 27, 2012 6:38:37 PM EST

Subject:     Re: PIPA/SOPA

 

I agree that SHAKSPER would have some vulnerability to SOPA/PIPA attack because of the kinds of links Gabriel Egan mentions. Real vulnerability, however, would depend on the political activities of Hardy and SHAKSPER members. If, with a SOPA/PIPA law to arm it, there were a US Government perception that this website is of any political use to opponents of the security state and its so-called “war on terror”, SHAKSPER would be history forthwith. 

 

I might point out that things previously unthinkable are now commonplace in post-9/11 America. Maybe if SOPA/PIPA fails of passage the government will use another method with which it has already had such great success: the CIA tracks down the offenders and the president orders them killed.  

 

Best to all,

Bob Projansky

 

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