Borrowers and Lenders 6.2

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 23.008  Monday, 9 January 2012

 

From:         Sujata Iyengar <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:          January 6, 2012 7:25:44 PM EST

Subject:      B&L 6.2 

 

The Editors are thrilled to announce the release of Borrowers and Lenders: The Journal of Shakespeare and Appropriation 6.2, featuring ground-breaking new work by Juliet Dusinberre on Wilfred Owen’s Macbeth (including illustrations of Owen's manuscript revisions to “On My Songs” and “Strange Meeting”); Laurie Osborne on the Outrageous Fortunes of Slings and Arrows; Ailsa Ferguson on the commodified body, Robert Mapplethorpe, and My Own Private Idaho; and reviews by Lisa Starks-Estes and Sheila Cavanagh. You can find current and previous issue at www.borrowers.uga.edu.

 

About the Journal:

Borrowers and Lenders: The Journal of Shakespeare and Appropriation, founded in 2005, is a peer-reviewed, online, multimedia Shakespeare journal and winner of the CELJ’s :Best New Journal” Award (2007). We are fully indexed in the World Shakespeare Bibliography, the Modern Language Association Bibliography, and other scholarly databases.

The editors of Borrowers and Lenders: The Journal of Shakespeare and Appropriation welcome original scholarship engaging with the afterlives of Shakespearean texts and their literary, filmic, multimedia, and critical histories. We encourage contributors to use the online format to its best advantage, in particular, by imagining how to enhance or illustrate their essays with multimedia (screen captures, sound clips, images, and so on). General issues appear in the Fall/Winter, and Special issues in the Spring/Summer, although the production schedule can vary. We welcome suggestions for themes for special issues.

 

General inquiries should be addressed to the General Editors, Christy Desmet and Sujata Iyengar, by email at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or to Associate Editor Robert Sawyer at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Book reviewers may contact our book review editor, Joshua King, directly by email at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Reviewers of Appropriations in Performance may contact our performance review editor, Matthew Kozusko, directly at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., for guidelines.

 

Special Issue: We are currently calling for papers for a special issue on “Shakespeare and African American Poetics,” in collaboration with the Langston Hughes Review, with “Poetics” understood broadly to encompass all forms of African American artistic and literary endeavor. Essays will be sent to both a Shakespearean and to an African Americanist for review. Send completed essays to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. by March 1, 2012. Queries are welcome and should be addressed to the General Editors.

 

Dr. Sujata IyengarPark Hall

Department of English

University of Georgia

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

ASC: The 2012 Actors’ Renaissance Season

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 23.007  Monday, 9 January 2012

 

From:         Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:          Monday, 9 January 2012    

Subject:      ASC: The 2012 Actors’ Renaissance Season

 

American Shakespeare Center Announces The 2012 Actors’ Renaissance Season 

 

Much Ado about Nothing

STARTS JANUARY 6

In Much Ado about Nothing Shakespeare gives us the sparkling wit of Beatrice and Benedick and the heroic blunders of Dogberry and company.  He gives us the joy of love won and the ache of love lost.  As the villain Don John devises a scheme to shatter the wedding of young lovers Claudio and Hero, friends of Beatrice and Benedick conspire to trick them into admitting their much-denied love for one another.  In this powerful comedy, Shakespeare makes you laugh, but also breaks your heart - and magically puts it back together again.

 

Richard III

STARTS JANUARY 19

Richard III chronicles the cataclysmic end of England’s greatest power struggle, the Wars of the Roses.  Richard, as the play’s remarkable ringmaster, takes the audience into his confidence as he plots to kill everyone before him in line for the throne.  Being seduced by Richard’s shameless treachery is one of theatre-going's most delicious guilty pleasures.

 

Philaster, or Love Lies a-Bleeding

By Francis Beaumont and John Fletcher

STARTS FEBRUARY 2

Blackfriars Premiere. Two love triangles dominate this beautiful, sexy, troubling, and surprising romance.  Two princes and a princess act recklessly, a king rules foolishly, and a curious youth loves hopelessly.  Loves lies bleeding in Beaumont and Fletcher’s dazzling fairy-tale for adults, but it does ultimately heal.

 

A Mad World, My Masters

By Thomas Middleton

STARTS FEBRUARY 23

Blackfriars Premiere. Middleton’s deliriously sinful comedy introduces the fabulous grifters Dick Follywit, a mad-brain trickster, and Frank Gullman, who turns out to be a resourceful courtesan. Money and sex, swindles and scams take center stage in the mad world of Jacobean London - with the unexpected possibility of true love in a most unlikely couple.

 

Dido, Queen of Carthage

By Christopher Marlowe

STARTS MARCH 14

Blackfriars Premiere. Arriving in Carthage after the fall of his beloved city, the Trojan hero Aeneas begins a passionate and dangerous love affair with Queen Dido.  Unknown to the lovers, the gods are pulling their strings - with disastrous results.  Part Antony and Cleopatra, part A Midsummer Night's Dream, and part The Tempest - Dido, Queen of Carthage is Marlowe’s ravishing take on Virgil’s Aeneid.

 

American Shakespeare Center 

10 S. Market St

Staunton, Virginia 24401

 

Folger Exhibition: The King James Bible

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 23.006  Monday, 9 January 2012

 

From:         Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:          Monday, January 9, 2012              

Subject:      Folger Exhibition: The King James Bible

 

 

Alpha and Omega

Folger Exhibitions: The King James Bible

 

Manifold Greatness, which tells the story of the creation of the King James Bible and the book’s ongoing cultural influence closes at the Folger this month. Explore the dynamic history of the King James Bible, from its roots in earlier English translations to its appearance in popular culture. Plus, exhibition curator Hannibal Hamlin dispels some famous King James Bible myths, and the interactive Read the Book feature allows you to read the text, listen to commentary, or hear recordings of selected passages. 

 

A traveling exhibition of Manifold Greatness will be on tour throughout the U.S. until 2013. Check the tour schedule to see if it’s coming to a city near you. 

 

Exhibition closes at the Folger January 16! 

Open Daily 

10am to 5pm, Monday through Saturday 

12pm to 5pm, Sunday

 

Free:

BlogWorthy: Myths Debunked

Interactive: Read the Book

Plan a Visit: Manifold Greatness Tour Schedule

 

Thanks

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 23.005  Thursday, 5 January 2012

 

From:         Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:          Thursday, January 5, 2012              

Subject:      Thanks

 

I would like to take a moment to thank all of the subscribers and readers of SHAKSPER during 2011, with my sincerest gratitude to all who made donations.

 

SHAKSPER would not be possible without the support of its members and readers.

 

Thanks,

Hardy

 

Foreign Languages in Shakespeare

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 23.004  Thursday, 5 January 2012

 

From:         Annie Martirosyan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         January 3, 2012 2:34:14 PM EST

Subject:      Re: SHAKSPER: Foreign Languages

 

Ron Severdia <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.> asked, 

 

>Is there any resource or book available on the use of foreign languages >throughout Shakespeare's works? I recall seeing something a long time >ago that identified all the usage of any non-English words in the canon, >but can't remember what it was.

 

Yes, there is. Go to the List of Themes and find "Languages and Dialects". http://shakespeareswords.com/Topics-List.aspx

 

Cheers,

Annie

 

[Editor’s Note: If you are not familiar with David and Ben Crystal’s Shakespeare's Words web site, you owe it to yourself to visit it: http://shakespeareswords.com/Default.aspx. -HMC]

 

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