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EMLS 16.1

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 23.062  Monday, 13 February 2012

 

From:        Sean Lawrence < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         Monday, 13 Feb 2012 12:12:53 -0800

Subject:     EMLS 16.1

 

To whom it may concern:

 

The first number of volume 16 of Early Modern Literary Studies has recently been posted. As usual, it is available for download free and without subscription at the following web address: http://purl.org/emls

 

The table of contents follows.

 

Sincerely,

Sean Lawrence.

 

Early Modern Literary Studies 16.1 (2012)

 

 

Articles: 

 

Pious Aeneas, False Aeneas: Marlowe’s Dido, Queen of Carthage and the Gift of Death. Mathew Martin, Brock University. [1]

 

The publication of No-body and Some-body: humanism, history and economics in the early Jacobean public theatre. Anthony Archdeacon, Liverpool Hope University. [2]

Fair Foul and Right Wrong: The Language of Alchemy in Timon of Athens. Anna Feuer, Wolfson College, Oxford. [3]

 

England’s Adam: the short career of the Giant Samothes in English Reformation thought. Jack P. Cunningham, Bishop Grosseteste University College, Lincoln. [4] 

 

Learning to Obey in Milton and Homer. Daniel Shore, Georgetown University. [5] 

 

 

Reviews: 

 

John M. Adrian, Local Negotiations of English Nationhood, 1570-1680. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2011. Patrick J. Murray, University of Glasgow. [6]

 

David J. Baker. On Demand: Writing for the Market in Early Modern England. Stanford: Stanford UP, 2010. Jonathan P. Lamb, University of Kansas. [7] 

 

Elizabeth Clarke, Politics, Religion and the Song of Songs in Seventeenth-Century England. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2011. Marie-Louise Coolahan, National University of Ireland, Galway. [8] 

 

A. D. Cousins and Alison V. Scott, eds. Ben Jonson and the Politics of Genre. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2009. Bernadette Andrea, University of Texas, San Antonio. [9]

 

Simon C. Estok. Ecocriticism and Shakespeare: Reading Ecophobia. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2011. Todd Borlik, Bloomsburg University. [10]

 

Jane Kingsley-Smith. Cupid in Early Modern Literature and Culture. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2011. William Junker, University of St. Thomas. [11]

 

Kirk Melnikoff, ed., Robert Greene. Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2011. Jenny Sager, Jesus College, Oxford. [12]

 

 

Theatre Reviews: 

 

Two productions of Dr Faustus on Bankside, presented by Little Goblin Productions at the Rose Theatre, and by Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre, Summer 2011. Neil Forsyth, University of Lausanne. [13]

 

Hamlet presented by the Jungle Theater, Minneapolis, Minnesota. 26 August – 9 October, 2011. Bruce E. Brandt South Dakota State University. [14]

 

East Anglia Shakespeare, Summer/Autumn 2011. Michael Grosvenor Myer. [15]

 

Measure for Measure, Julius Caesar, Henry IV Part Two, Love’s Labor’s Lost, The African Company Presents Richard III, and Ghostlight, presented by the Oregon Shakespeare Festival, February-November 2011. Geoff Ridden, Southern Oregon University. [16]

 

Othello presented at the Crucible Theatre, Sheffield, 27th September 2011. Claire Warden, University of Lincoln. [17]

 

The Two Noble Kinsmen, King Edward III, and Double Falsehood, presented by Atlanta's New American Shakespeare Tavern (March-June 2011). Joanne E. Gates, Jacksonville State University. [18]

 

The Tempest (Stormen), presented by the Royal Dramatic Theatre, Stockholm, November 19, 2010. Neil Forsyth and Anna Swärdh University of Lausanne and University of Karlstad. [19]

 

’Tis Pity She’s A Whore, a rehearsed reading presented at the Samuel Beckett Theatre, Trinity College Dublin. 9th June 2011. Edel Semple, University College Dublin. [20]

 

 

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