Tiffany Stern on Shakespeare

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 23.063  Monday, 13 February 2012

 

From:        Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         February 12, 2012 10:25:02 PM EST

Subject:     Tiffany Stern on Shakespeare

 

I learned from William Sutton’s I Love Shakespeare Blog 

 

 http://www.facebook.com/groups/119899154688265/

 

of a 15 minute talk by Professor Tiffany Stern of Oxford University.

 

http://podcasts.ox.ac.uk/william-shakespeare-video

 

 

Professor Tiffany Stern gives a talk on William Shakespeare and how his plays were performed in Elizabethan England.

 

Series: Great Writers Inspire

Tiffany Stern

English Faculty

 

EMLS 16.1

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 23.062  Monday, 13 February 2012

 

From:        Sean Lawrence <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         Monday, 13 Feb 2012 12:12:53 -0800

Subject:     EMLS 16.1

 

To whom it may concern:

 

The first number of volume 16 of Early Modern Literary Studies has recently been posted. As usual, it is available for download free and without subscription at the following web address: http://purl.org/emls

 

The table of contents follows.

 

Sincerely,

Sean Lawrence.

 

Early Modern Literary Studies 16.1 (2012)

 

 

Articles: 

 

Pious Aeneas, False Aeneas: Marlowe’s Dido, Queen of Carthage and the Gift of Death. Mathew Martin, Brock University. [1]

 

The publication of No-body and Some-body: humanism, history and economics in the early Jacobean public theatre. Anthony Archdeacon, Liverpool Hope University. [2]

Fair Foul and Right Wrong: The Language of Alchemy in Timon of Athens. Anna Feuer, Wolfson College, Oxford. [3]

 

England’s Adam: the short career of the Giant Samothes in English Reformation thought. Jack P. Cunningham, Bishop Grosseteste University College, Lincoln. [4] 

 

Learning to Obey in Milton and Homer. Daniel Shore, Georgetown University. [5] 

 

 

Reviews: 

 

John M. Adrian, Local Negotiations of English Nationhood, 1570-1680. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2011. Patrick J. Murray, University of Glasgow. [6]

 

David J. Baker. On Demand: Writing for the Market in Early Modern England. Stanford: Stanford UP, 2010. Jonathan P. Lamb, University of Kansas. [7] 

 

Elizabeth Clarke, Politics, Religion and the Song of Songs in Seventeenth-Century England. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2011. Marie-Louise Coolahan, National University of Ireland, Galway. [8] 

 

A. D. Cousins and Alison V. Scott, eds. Ben Jonson and the Politics of Genre. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2009. Bernadette Andrea, University of Texas, San Antonio. [9]

 

Simon C. Estok. Ecocriticism and Shakespeare: Reading Ecophobia. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2011. Todd Borlik, Bloomsburg University. [10]

 

Jane Kingsley-Smith. Cupid in Early Modern Literature and Culture. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2011. William Junker, University of St. Thomas. [11]

 

Kirk Melnikoff, ed., Robert Greene. Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2011. Jenny Sager, Jesus College, Oxford. [12]

 

 

Theatre Reviews: 

 

Two productions of Dr Faustus on Bankside, presented by Little Goblin Productions at the Rose Theatre, and by Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre, Summer 2011. Neil Forsyth, University of Lausanne. [13]

 

Hamlet presented by the Jungle Theater, Minneapolis, Minnesota. 26 August – 9 October, 2011. Bruce E. Brandt South Dakota State University. [14]

 

East Anglia Shakespeare, Summer/Autumn 2011. Michael Grosvenor Myer. [15]

 

Measure for Measure, Julius Caesar, Henry IV Part Two, Love’s Labor’s Lost, The African Company Presents Richard III, and Ghostlight, presented by the Oregon Shakespeare Festival, February-November 2011. Geoff Ridden, Southern Oregon University. [16]

 

Othello presented at the Crucible Theatre, Sheffield, 27th September 2011. Claire Warden, University of Lincoln. [17]

 

The Two Noble Kinsmen, King Edward III, and Double Falsehood, presented by Atlanta's New American Shakespeare Tavern (March-June 2011). Joanne E. Gates, Jacksonville State University. [18]

 

The Tempest (Stormen), presented by the Royal Dramatic Theatre, Stockholm, November 19, 2010. Neil Forsyth and Anna Swärdh University of Lausanne and University of Karlstad. [19]

 

’Tis Pity She’s A Whore, a rehearsed reading presented at the Samuel Beckett Theatre, Trinity College Dublin. 9th June 2011. Edel Semple, University College Dublin. [20]

 

NEH Institute on Roman Comedy in Performance

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 23.061  Monday, 13 February 2012

 

From:        Timothy Moore <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         February 11, 2012 1:15:40 PM EST

Subject:     NEH Institute on Roman Comedy in Performance

 

An NEH Summer Institute for College and University Faculty, “Roman Comedy in Performance,” will be held in Chapel Hill, North Carolina from June 24th through July 20th , 2012. Co-directed by Professors Sharon L. James (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill) and Timothy J. Moore (University of Texas at Austin), the NEH Summer Institute will give NEH Summer Scholars (twenty-two university or college faculty members and three graduate students) the opportunity to discuss the performance practice and social significance of Roman Comedy with leading experts in the field and to practice scholarship through performance, producing their own performances of scenes from the plays of Plautus and Terence. The NEH Summer Scholars for this Institute will include non-classicists as well as classicists, and no knowledge of Latin is required. 

 

Participants will receive a stipend of $3,300. 

 

Applications are due by March 1, 2012. For more information, consult http://nehsummer2012romancomedy.web.unc.edu/ or write to either co-director: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

 

Timothy J. Moore

Department of Classics

The University of Texas at Austin

1 University Station, C3400

Austin, TX 78712-0308

512-232-4161

 

NEH Summer Institute: Roman Comedy in Performance: http://nehsummer2012romancomedy.web.unc.edu/

 

Shakespearean Productions

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 23.060  Friday, 10 February 2012

 

[1] From:        Kevin Costa <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

     Date:         February 9, 2012 2:45:05 PM EST

     Subject:     Re: SHAKSPER: Productions

 

[2] From:        Paul Barry <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

     Date:         February 10, 2012 12:50:57 PM EST

     Subject:     Re: SHAKSPER: Productions

 

[3] From:        Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

     Date:         Friday, February 10, 2012

     Subject:     Shakespearean Productions

 

 

[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------

From:        Kevin Costa <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         February 9, 2012 2:45:05 PM EST

Subject:     Re: SHAKSPER: Productions

 

Dear Hardy,

 

I am in complete agreement with your assessment of the Shakespeare Theatre and, more importantly, of your celebration of the American Shakespeare Center. I first saw ASC play in the summer of 2002, and I have been hooked—deeply hooked—ever since. No one says it better than Stephen Booth, of course, but, when asked, I’ve described being at the Blackfriars for a play feeling like a celebration or the way a child feels on Christmas morning. In a word, it’s exhilarating. 

 

This isn’t to say that the Shakespeare Theatre doesn’t produce good work; it does. In fact, the theatres are so different in so many fundamental ways that it’s hard to compare them. And it even feels more like a difference in style. At ASC, you don’t just experience a production of a Shakespeare play (or a Marlowe, Middleton, or Marston—no one does so many productions of Shakespeare’s contemporaries) -- you experience house style that is the result of a crystal-clear a point-of-view, a point-of-view one that every member of ASC believes in!

 

I’m happy to say that ASC isn’t the only theatre restless to explore Shakespeare’s staging practices. The Chesapeake Shakespeare Company (www.chesapeakeshakespeare.com), located in Ellicott City, MD—a stone’s throw from DC—is just as hungry to reach its audiences with energy and with an ironclad commitment to privileging language above all. As an artistic associate of the company, I have to admit my bias, to be sure; but as a member of CSC, I can say, first-hand, just how committed we are to playing Shakespeare in ways that are, in your words, “completely accessible.”  

 

Thanks for starting a great conversation.

 

Kevin Costa

Education Director & Artistic Associate

Chesapeake Shakespeare Company

www.chesapeakeshakespeare.com

 

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------

From:        Paul Barry <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         February 10, 2012 12:50:57 PM EST

Subject:     Re: SHAKSPER: Productions

 

Dear Hardy Cook:

 

I think you’re talking about the differences between the convictions/beliefs of Ralph Cohen and Michael Kahn, both of who have strong opinions about how Shakespeare should be played.  They’re not alone.

 

Paul Barry

 

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------

From:        Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         Friday, February 10, 2012

Subject:     Shakespearean Productions

 

Dear Kevin and Paul,

 

Thank you both for taking the time to respond to my attempt at provocation. 

 

Obviously, I would not have continued to pay for 1 to 4 subscriptions every year for the past 35 years if I had not gotten something out of attending the Shakespeare Theater.

 

And just as obviously, Ralph Cohen and Michael Kahn have strong opinions that inform the house styles of both institutions. However, I think I was trying to suggest some issues that transcend opinions.

 

All those many years ago, I wrote my dissertation on “Reading Shakespeare on Television.” What I was theorizing were matters of what strategies of Shakespearean production are effective/appropriate to then what we called the “small” screen. It was a cross-disciplinary study in English/Theater/Film. As a consequence of this immersion, I continue to think about what seems to work, or is appropriate if I dare go so far, to productions in different media, different conditions of production. 

 

When I attend a production of Verdi’s Otello, let’s say at the Kennedy Center Opera House, I expect to see the production in a HUGE space and hear performers doing the musical equivalent of declamation. However, I do not have the same expectation when I see/hear Shakespeare. Now, the logical response to what I have just typed is that I am now casting my points as expressions of my expectations—the theatrical experience as reader response. This would be a fair position. 

 

Let’s consider the space of performance for a moment. I have a preference for having my Shakespeare performed in more intimate rather than cavernous spaces. I find the dynamics of production deeply affected by the space in which it is performed. One could note the differences between acting styles on the 19th Century stage and on stages like the Globe reconstruction in London and the Blackfriars in Staunton. The space of performances of Shakespeare was only one of the issues I was hinting at in my initial post.

 

I was also alluding to matters of appeal to audiences, in I believe what was an overly polite way. But do not different convictions/beliefs/opinions have influences on the audiences to which those productions are directed and thus the audiences those productions attract, or can afford, and thus on accessibility in many senses?

 

I am not trying to lay down laws or strictures. I am genuinely interested in having discussions exploring various matters of Shakespeare as produced today.

 

I am going away for a few days to visit my younger daughter at her college and to see the Van Gogh exhibition in Philadelphia. Later next week, I am having surgery on my left hand and not knowing how long it will take me to regain my lightening fast (do not believe all that is written on SHAKSPER) typing speed, so I thought I would get some of my thoughts out now. Finally, apologies if I have been somewhat distracted as I composed this message, but Becca, that younger daughter, just introduced me to Christophe Maé, whose upbeat music I have been listening to as I wrote. One advantage of my having children relatively late in life is that they keep me young in so many ways.

 

Hardy

 

Rare Words in Shakespeare

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 23.059  Thursday, 9 February 2012

 

From:        Jonathan Hope <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         February 9, 2012 9:57:18 AM EST

Subject:     RE: Rare words in Shakespeare

 

Another way to get at rare (and common) words in Shakespeare is to use WordHoard - which I rate as the best Shakespeare analysis site available:

 

http://wordhoard.northwestern.edu/userman/index.html

 

the interface is very good, and the manual is excellent.

 

If you look in the manual for the ‘lexicon’ feature:

 

http://wordhoard.northwestern.edu/userman/lexicon.html

 

you will find that this gives you a list of all words in Shakespeare with their frequency counts - you can order this list by ‘count’ to see all once-only words.

 

Double clicking on a word takes you to summary information on that word and (eventually with more clicks), the word's location in a text.

 

Happy searching!

jh

 

[Editor’s Note: I second that. WordHoard is the work of Martin Mueller, SHAKSPERean and member of the SHAKSPER Book Review Panel. –Hardy]

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Search

Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.