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Troilus & Cressida, Genre
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 2, No. 147. Thursday, 30 May 1991.
 
(1)	Date: 	Thu, 30 May 1991 01:26:00 -0400
	From: 	"George Mosley" <MOSLEY@UNC.BITNET>
	Subj: 	Re: SHK 2.0146  Genre and *TC*
 
(2)	Date: 	Thu, 30 May 91 09:37:54 PDT
	From: 	Kay Stockholder <
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 >
	Subj: 	SHK 2.0146  Genre and *TC*
 
(1) --------------------------------------------------------------------
 
Date: 		Thu, 30 May 1991 01:26:00 -0400
From: 		"George Mosley" <MOSLEY@UNC.BITNET>
Subject: 2.0146  Genre and *TC*
Comment: 	Re: SHK 2.0146  Genre and *TC*
 
I've been relatively amused by the trouble some have with amusement
as well.  Frank Palmeri, in an article on Swift's *A Tale of a Tub,*
mentions that that work is, like T&C, only properly called
"narrative satire," where (rough quote) the hero neither learns
anything nor dies and Pandarus bequeaths his diseases onto the
audience applauding him.
 
I've been working on working on parody for my dissertation, and
except for Joseph A. Dane, there hasn't been a single book on
parody in English since the 1930s.  In general, you seem correct in
saying that critics in general have a hard time with satire.  There
is no way, it seems, to reduce the wonders of humor to a system,
and without a system, system-makers seem lost.
 
It would be interesting to see what Pope and Theobald make of
T&C, since they edited Shakespeare in an age overrun with satire.
 
(2) --------------------------------------------------------------------
 
Date: 		Thu, 30 May 91 09:37:54 PDT
From: 		
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Subject: Genre and *TC*
Comment: 	SHK 2.0146  Genre and *TC*
 
Dear Steve,  Why do you think satire is more difficult to theorize
than comedy and tragedy?  Is it because satire by definition
refers to the world beyond itself?  If yes, then any discussion
of theme in any genre also presupposes reference to a world
beyond itself.  If one is predisposed to deny that what appears
as thematic reference is really so I don't see any greater
difficulty in denying that what appears as satiric reference
is really so, rather than a trope to engage readers in a
certain way.  However, you may have something altogether
different in mind.
				Yours,
 
				Kay Stockholder
				[
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