Explanation and Further Hiatus

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 23.160  Thursday, 26 April 2012

 

From:        Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         Thursday, April 26, 2012

Subject:     Explanation and Further Hiatus

 

Dear Subscribers,

 

My chronic health problems flared up again and knocked me out for a few weeks. I am sorry it has taken so long for me to get back to editing, but unfortunately tomorrow afternoon I leave for a weeklong silent meditation retreat and will not be back until Friday May 4, causing another hiatus in receiving digests from SHAKSPER. Before I leave tomorrow afternoon, I will work assiduously to catch up with all of the announcements and other submissions since the last digest.

 

I learned from my younger daughter Rebecca that the Reduced Shakespeare Company has a tweet site at http://www.reducedshakespeare.com/2009/11/tweeting-shakespeare/ in addition to their regular site at http://www.reducedshakespeare.com/ .

 

Even though I was not well I managed to see Rebecca in Othello at Bryn Mawr College. She makes a fairly convincing man, but she is much prettier as a young woman.

 

 

image Rebecca in Othello at Bryn Mawr College 1

 

 

image Rebecca in Othello 2

 

 

image Rebecca in Othello 3

 

 

image Rebecca in Othello 4

 

 

 

Henry V, Act 3, Scene 4

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 23.159  Friday, 13 April 2012

 

From:        John Briggs <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         April 12, 2012 4:58:23 PM EDT

Subject:     Re: SHAKSPER: Henry V, Act 3, Scene 4

 

Richard Waugaman wrote:

 

>Alan Stewart of Columbia recently gave an excellent talk on “The 

>French Shakespeare.” During the discussion afterwards, we 

>pondered the question of Henry V, Act III, scene 4, being 

>entirely in French. How would early audiences have reacted? 

>Professor Stewart found the following surmise to be

plausible—this scene was performed at court, with its 

>French-speaking audience, but was perhaps omitted 

>during public performances.

>

>If this hypothesis also strikes you as plausible, are the other 

>such scenes extant, that may have been written solely for 

>court performance?

 

No, it does not strike me as remotely plausible. (Did the Tudors also speak Welsh at Court?)

 

Two pointers:

 

1. Act 3, Scene 4 is present (severely mangled) in the “Bad Quarto”. Now, say what you like about Bad Quartos, but no-one has ever accused them of representing court performances.

 

2. The only recorded court performance of Henry V was at Whitehall on 7 January 1605. (The Bad Quarto of 1600 omits the choruses, and it is possible that these were added for that court performance, especially as it probably took place in the Cockpit—which held the vasty fields of France?)

 

John Briggs

 

Shakespeare and Emotions at Anzsa

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 23.158  Friday, 13 April 2012

 

From:        BSA <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         April 13, 2012 11:28:51 AM EDT

Subject:    Shakespeare and Emotions at Anzsa

 

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SHAKESPEARE AND EMOTIONS

The 11th Biennial International Conference of the Australian and New Zealand Shakespeare Association in collaboration with the ARC Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions

27-30 November 2012

The University of Western Australia

Perth, Western Australia

Keynote speakers include Farah Karim-Cooper (Shakespeare’s Globe London), Philippa Kelly (California Shakespeare Theater and UNSW), Steven Mullaney (University of Michigan) and Barrie Rutter (Artristic Director, NorthernBroadside Theatre Company). Additional keynote speakers are to be announced.

The study of emotions in history, literature, and other aspects of culture is a burgeoning field, and Shakespeare takes a very central and influential place. The conveners invite papers on any aspect of the ways in which Shakespeare and/or his contemporaries represented emotions in poetry, drama, and other works, and/or how these representations have been received by audiences and readers from the sixteenth century to the present day.

There are paradoxes to be explored—how ‘the bodily turn’ of physiological influence on emotions could in turn generate more modern models of inner consciousness alone; how concepts rooted historically in Elizabethan and Jacobean England could be adapted to fit the philosophies and concepts of later ages, through eighteenth-century literature of sensibility, nineteenth-century and Darwinian approaches, twentieth-century psychologism stimulated by Freud, and a host of others. Did Shakespeare tap into a ‘collective unconscious’ of ‘universal’ stories, or did he arbitrarily choose stories to dramatise which his affective eloquence incorporated into world literature? Why have his works proved so durable in their emotional power, both in themselves and adaptations into other media such as opera, music, film and dance? Equal attention is invited to plays in performance and in ‘closet’ critical readings, as well as textual studies and adaptations.

The New Fortune Theatre, built in 1964 to the exact dimensions of The Fortune playhouse that rivaled Shakespeare’s Globe in seventeenth-century London, will be available for original practice performances, open rehearsals, and stage-based research papers, etc.

If you wish your presentation to be considered for a Performance Workshop on the New Fortune stage, please indicate this clearly in your title.

Abstracts of c.200 words should be submitted for consideration to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.%3Cmailto:This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.">This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.<mailto:This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>, addressed to Bob White, Chris Wortham, Danijela Kambaskovic-Sawers, Mark Houlahan, and Brett D. Hirsch. Abstracts should be received by 1 July 2012.

Please bear in mind that although our venues have full capability for Powerpoint presentations and projecting files from your computers, wireless Internet reception is in some rooms unavailable. If you will need Internet access for your presentation, please make this clear in your abstract to allow us to programme accordingly.

For more details about the conference, visit http://conference.anzsa.org/

VU-ing STM’s D & LLL

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 23.157  Thursday, 12 April 2012

 

From:        Larry Weiss <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         April 10, 2012 5:45:32 PM EDT

Subject:     Re: SHAKSPER: Tempest App; VU-ing

 

>Might STM [St. Thomas More] be reported?

 

That wouldn’t be likely if, as is traditionally supposed, the play was never performed.

Henry V, Act 3, Scene 4

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 23.156  Thursday, 12 April 2012

From:        Richard Waugaman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         April 10, 2012 7:04:19 PM EDT

Subject:     Henry V, Act 3, Scene 4

 

Alan Stewart of Columbia recently gave an excellent talk on “The French Shakespeare.” During the discussion afterwards, we pondered the question of Henry V, Act III, scene 4, being entirely in French. How would early audiences have reacted? Professor Stewart found the following surmise to be plausible—this scene was performed at court, with its French-speaking audience, but was perhaps omitted during public performances. 

 

If this hypothesis also strikes you as plausible, are the other such scenes extant, that may have been written solely for court performance?

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