Maria

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 23.0215  Thursday, 31 May 2012

 

From:        Pete McCluskey <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         May 30, 2012 2:11:22 PM EDT

Subject:     RE: Maria

 

John Briggs correctly identifies the implausibility of my off-the-cuff suggestion that Maria and Antonio might be played by the same actor.  Here’s a more-plausible suggestion: the same actor doubles as Maria and the Priest.  Maria’s last appearance in the play ends with her exit as 4.2.71 (Riverside), and the priest appears about 90 lines later (4.3.20) and again at 5.1.150 to confirm that he has married Olivia to Sebastian.  The text gives no indication that the Priest exits, so he remains onstage throughout the scene, thus making an appearance by Maria impossible.  

 

Peter M. McCluskey

Associate Professor

English Department

Middle Tennessee State University

 

WordCruncher/Riverside

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 23.0214  Thursday, 31 May 2012

 

From:        Gabriel Egan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         May 30, 2012 10:05:19 AM EDT

Subject:     Re: SHAKSPER: WordCruncher/Riverside; Maria

 

Hardy: in your Virtual Machine software create a machine running 32-bit Windows XP. (You can still buy XP on Ebay.) That 32-bit XP machine will happily run the Chadwyck-Healey CD-ROMs even though the software running the virtualization is 64 bit. That’s what I do to keep running CD-ROM versions (well, virtualized as hard disk images of CD-ROMs) of OED, Editions and Adaptations of Shakespeare, ESTC, and The Arden Shakespeare.  Running the Virtual Machine is a 64-bit copy of Windows 7, but the applications don’t know that.

 

Happy to expand on the above if it’s helpful.

 

Gabriel Egan

 

Next-Generation Platform for Academics

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 23.0213  Thursday, 31 May 2012

From:        Hardy Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         May 31, 2012 8:27:12 AM EDT

Subject:     Next-Generation Platform for Academics

 

[Editor’s Note: 

WARNING: Patricia Parker followed up with the IT department at Stanford who informed her that the Next-Generation Platform announced here last week is not a project of Harvard University but is trading on the Harvard name. 

My apologies for any confusion. 

-Hardy Cook]

 

http://www.academicroom.com/?utm_source=MailingList&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Invitation+to+Scholars

 

Dear colleague,

 

Academic Room is an online initiative that was conceived at Harvard University as an independent initiative to facilitate multidisciplinary engagements among scholars and researchers around the world. Our mission is to democratize access to scholarly resources, which are organized in over 10,000 academic sub-disciplines. We share the conviction that easy and unimpeded access to quality educational resources should be a right and not a privilege. Our platform allows academics, researchers and students to create highly specialized portals for their subfields. These portals can be enriched with professional directories, scholar profiles, video lectures, bibliographies, journal articles, books, reviews, images, ancient manuscripts and audio recordings.

You are invited to participate in our pilot launch. Please register and also encourage students, teachers and researchers within your institution to join. Together, we can make a real difference. 

 

Best wishes,

Academic Room Editors

Academic Room 

184 Green Street 

Suite 1 

Cambridge, MA 02139

http://www.academicroom.com/

 

Maria

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 23.0212  Wednesday, 30 May 2012

 

From:        Anna Kamaralli <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         May 30, 2012 4:59:58 AM EDT

Subject:     Re: SHAKSPER: Maria

 

Richard Madeleine has spent a long time working on the training of boy actors, and has (in a paper given at a colloquium I attended, but that I think is, unfortunately, still unpublished) put forward the theory that as boys probably ‘shadowed’ specific senior actors, some comic female roles may have been written for boys apprenticed specifically to clowns. Richard felt that Maria is being ‘mentored’ by Sir Toby. To extend this speculation a little further than Richard did (and I do concede this is speculation), Maria’s absence during the uncovering of the gulling of Malvolio could be because the boy’s mentor has been taken off stage at V.1.192, and couldn’t be there to shepherd him.

 

Anna Kamaralli

Updated WordCruncher

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 23.0212  Wednesday, 30 May 2012

 

From:        Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         Wednesday, May 30, 2012

Subject:     Updated WordCruncher

 

After using PCs since the early 1980s, I switched to Macs several years ago. I was able to find Mac programs for almost every PC application I had used as my excuse for not switching. Well, there were a few for which no clear replacement was evident, so I have a virtual machine on a separate 27” monitor to run those programs. Among them are Elaine and John Thiesmeyer’s Editor program from Serenity Software, Quicken for Windows, and TurboTax. (I know about Quicken for Mac and I will share my opinion of it privately to anyone who asks. Hint, it rhymes with mucks.)

 

However, because I was now using a 64-bit machine, I could no longer run some of the old 32-bit Widows programs I was still attached to. These programs included TACT and the Chadwyck-Healey The Bible in English and the Chadwyck-Healey Editions and Adaptations of Shakespeare, both of which I could still use in LION, but I missed as standalone programs. 

 

However, the program I missed the most and that I had used since my early days of computing was WordCruncher with The Riverside Shakespeare. Other concordances are available online, but I found WordCruncher with the Riverside particularly useful when I was annotating text for notes in an edition.

 

As I returned to annotating Lucrece the other day, I was reminded of how much I missed the WordCruncher/Riverside combination that I discussed in my 1990 paper “A Shakespearean in the Electronic Study,” a paper presented to the computing approaches seminar of the 1990 SAA conference in Philadelphia: http://shaksper.net/documents/doc_download/53-electronic-study

 

On whim, I thought I might check and see if an updated 64-bit WordCrucher existed and to my amazement I found it at its original site of creation—Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah: 

 

http://www.wordcruncher.com/wordcruncher/Download.htm

 

This updated WordCruncher comes in both a Windows 32-bit and 64-bit version with a free copy of The Riverside Shakespeare; a few other applications can be downloaded. I forget how much I initially paid for WordCruncher and the Riverside, but the cost was not nominal and certainly not free.

 

Perhaps the time of WordCruncher as a text analysis tool has passed, but I am enormously pleased to have my old friend back.

 

Hardy M. Cook

Professor Emeritus

Bowie State University

Editor of SHAKSPER <shaksper.net>  

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. (SHAKSPER) 

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