My Brother Will

 

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 23.197  Wednesday, 23 May 2012

 

From:        Sophie Masson <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         May 22, 2012 5:56:09 PM EDT

Subject:     My Brother Will

 

I’m writing to announce of the release of My Brother Will, my new Shakespearean novel for adults, this time (I mainly write for young people) and which has just been published by British e-publisher AchukaBooks, as a Kindle-only edition (other formats may come later) and is now available for sale on amazon.com for US and Australian readers: 

 

http://www.amazon.com/My-Brother-Will-ACHUKAbooks-ebook/dp/B00852YA06/ref=sr_1_sc_1?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1337672443&sr=1-1-spelld

 

and Amazon.co.uk for British readers.

 

http://www.amazon.co.uk/My-Brother-Will-ACHUKAbooks-ebook/dp/B00852YA06/ref=sr_1_1?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1337671025&sr=1-1

 

(British readers can also buy it at amazon.com)

 

It’s the story of a pivotal year in the life of the Shakespeare family in Stratford, when Will was sixteen, and told in the voice of his younger brother Gilbert. Informed by the theory that the Shakespeare family were crypto-Catholics, it is a rich evocation of daily life in sixteenth-century Stratford and the surrounding countryside, centred around four festivals. It is a most unusual book which is written in a style pungently reminiscent of the period, yet without quaintness, and rests on a good deal of research on all kinds of aspects of Shakespeare’s background.

 

Sophie Masson

Author site: www.sophiemasson.org

Worlds Together Conference

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 23.196  Wednesday, 23 May 2012

From:        BSA <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         May 22, 2012 5:05:35 PM EDT

Subject:     Half-price offer for the Worlds Together Conference

 

A message from Tracy Irish, Education Programme Developer for the World Shakespeare Festival: 

 

Through a grant provided by the British Council to support the World Shakespeare Festival, produced by the RSC for London 2012, we are delighted to offer a 50% discount on a three day pass to our Worlds Together conference, 6- 8 September at Tate Modern in London.

 

World Together is an international conference exploring the  value of Shakespeare and the arts in young people’s lives. It is a  collaboration between Tate Modern, The British Museum, The National Theatre and  The Royal Shakespeare Company (RSC) drawing together different disciplines to  ask what is at stake for children’s cultural lives today. The Shakespeare  strand of this special three day event is for artists and educators passionate  about teaching Shakespeare. It offers exclusive access to leading artists and  practitioners through a range of workshops, discussions, seminars and key note addresses.

 

The conference pass includes access to the full three day programme of workshops, keynotes, panel discussions and presentations, free entry to the ‘Staging the World’ exhibition at the British Museum and offers for other cultural events connected to the London 2012 festival. A limited number of conference passes are available on a first come, first served basis at £195 (full price is £395).

 

For details on how to access this offer, please email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

For further details of the conference, please click on ‘Worlds Together conference’ from the drop down menu at www . worldshakespearefestival . org . uk/education

Hebrew Verbs

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 23.195  Tuesday, 22 May 2012

 

[1] From:        Larry Weiss <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

     Date:         May 21, 2012 3:28:00 PM EDT

     Subject:     Re: SHAKSPER: Hebrew Verbs

 

[2] From:        Markus Marti <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

     Date:         May 21, 2012 5:58:50 PM EDT

     Subject:     God

 

 

[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------

From:        Larry Weiss <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         May 21, 2012 3:28:00 PM EDT

Subject:     Re: SHAKSPER: Hebrew Verbs

 

To bring this back to Shakespeare, does anyone think this “I am” stuff has anything to do with Iago or Viola, both of whom declare that “I am not what I am”?

 

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------

From:        Markus Marti <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         May 21, 2012 5:58:50 PM EDT

Subject:     God

 

Is not the existence of this god person nonsensical?

Hebrew Verbs

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 23.194  Monday, 21 May 2012

 

From:        David Basch <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         May 20, 2012 12:11:13 PM EDT

Subject:     Re: SHAKSPER: Hebrew

 

In the discussion of 5/7/2012, Joe Egert quoted Hannibal Hamlin as

writing:

 

> Others on the list with Hebrew less rudimentary than mine will no

> doubt be able to answer with more precision, but, yes, it is my

> understanding that Hebrew does not have tense in the same way European

> languages do. Hebrew verbs have forms designating complete or

> incomplete action. In terms of Exodus 3:14, the result is that while

> the Geneva translation is correct, it is also reductive, since one

> might translate equally accurately using different English tenses --I

> am be what I will be, etc. One implication is that God’s

> self-description—not really one, let alone a name—includes eternal

> immutability—was, is, will be.

 

Concerning Hannibal’s exposition of the name that God gives as Himself in Exodus 3:14, which Hannibal describes as “eternal immutability—was, is, will be”—may I try to add some more detail on this matter? I would point out that English too, like Hebrew, could have the usage of a future tense that is also sensed as present.

 

As Harold Bloom in his recent Shakespeare lecture mentions, the King James’ verbal terms used in Exodus 3:14 are in the present tense, “I AM THAT I AM,” which, as Bloom notes, in the Hebrew is actually given in the future tense, “I WILL BE THAT I WILL BE.” Bloom credits the translator Tyndale as being the more accurate in giving the literal future tense.

 

But Tyndale’s literality does not mean that the King James translation is wrong. In fact, using the present tense gives a more accurate meaning. This is so since both interpretations are actually correct as understood in the Hebrew. But it happens that the present tense usage in the King James is the best way to render the import of the name given in the Hebrew.

 

I think this becomes clear when it is considered that to use the future tense would seem to say of God that “He exists only in the future,” which would be nonsensical. The King James usage of the present tense therefore comes closer to the meaning of the Hebrew than selecting the future tense would.

 

I would note that, in the episode in Exodus 2:13, in the way Moses speaks to the wicked Hebrew who strikes his comrade: “”Wherefore smitest thou thy fellow?” the actual words in Hebrew are also in the future tense. But, as can readily be understood in the episode, this Hebrew future tense is addressing an ongoing action of the wicked person of “striking” in the present. Moses’ words can be literally translated as, “Wherefore wilt thou strike thy fellow?” which can be readily understood as applied to a present situation. In effect, we understand the words as saying: “Wherefore wilt thou [have the present condition of smiting (smitest)] thy fellow?” The distinction is to raise the words of Moses to the level of a timeless aphorism, a sense that exists in the Hebrew but is lost in English.

 

Applying this to God’s name in Exo 3:14, while it can literally be translated into English, word for word, as: “I will be that I will be,” the meaning is also, “I am that I am.”

 

The Hebrew future tense, as happens with Moses’ literal words, can be understood as meaning “I will be [in the present condition of being] that I will be,” thereby encompassing both tenses. This gives what Hannibal describes as a sense of “eternal immutability”—eternal being. As mentioned, to translate in the future tense in English would actually limit the meaning that the Hebrew encompasses.

 

David Basch

Ardenwatch

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 23.193  Monday, 21 May 2012

 

From:        John Briggs <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         May 19, 2012 8:15:29 PM EDT

Subject:     SHAKSPER Ardenwatch

 

The Arden3 “Romeo and Juliet” edited by René Weis has just been published (my copy is marooned somewhere in the postal system.)

 

There are also four (four!) editions scheduled for publication over the next 16 months or so: “Coriolanus” later this year, and “Macbeth”, “King John” and “The Comedy of Errors” in 2013.

 

If the sacking of Pat Parker was really “pour encourager les autres” (as some suspected), then it seems to have had the desired effect . . .

 

John Briggs

 

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