Shakespeare YouTube Videos

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 23.0274  Wednesday, 27 June 2012

 

From:        Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         Wednesday, June 27, 2012

Subject:     Shakespeare YouTube Videos

 

My daughters while cooking together had a question that brought their post-modern selves to look it up on Google. There they came across a short YouTube video that they immediately called me about. 

 

Shakespeare—The History of English

From Open University's The History of English in Ten Minutes

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BMkuUADWW2A

 

While looking for the URL. I also came across David and Ben Crystal’s YouTube video on Shakespeare: Original Pronunciation, also from the Open University:

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gPlpphT7n9s

 

Enjoy,

Hardy

Performance

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 23.0273  Wednesday, 27 June 2012

 

From:        Jack Heller <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         June 27, 2012 12:21:10 PM EDT

Subject:     Performance

 

>As soon as this thread began, I was reminded of the discussion 

>years back of the Simon Russell Beale’s Hamlet. I am not 

>disappointed.

>

>I am also interested in how the “real” Hamlets (i.e., fixed and 

>stable) are known, except through performance.

>

>Hardy

 

This may be a late reply, but Hardy’s comment fits something I’ve discussed with several people recently. Last Wednesday, I attended the Shakespeare Behind Bars (Kentucky) performance of ROMEO AND JULIET. “Juliet” was performed by a middle-age former male skinhead, about as unlike in his own being from a thirteen/fourteen year-old teenage girl as a person can be.

 

But then, how persuasive were the boy actors in Shakespeare’s own time? Was Lady Macbeth a 14/15-year-old boy?

 

It would be easy to be condescending about the performances of a prison group, but the men worked on the play for about ten months before I saw the completion of their efforts. I am never going to confuse the inmate with Juliet herself, but the show as a whole wasn’t nearly as full of nonsense as some supposedly professional productions I’ve seen. The answer for every production, professional or amateur, is the same now as it was two centuries ago when it was first articulated, a WILLING suspension of disbelief. Once a person is willing, then we can tell if the effort has been rewarded.

 

There are no platonic ideal productions of any play.

 

Jack Heller

Dedication of “A Funeral Elegy”

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 23.0272  Tuesday, 26 June 2012

 

From:        Jim Carroll <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         June 26, 2012 2:21:54 PM EDT

Subject:     Dedication of “A Funeral Elegy”

 

The dedication of “A Funeral Elegy” seems, to me at least, to be rather obviously by Shakespeare. There are many reasons for this, not the least of which is that when I read it, it reads like a Shakespearean dedication, much like the Lucrece and Venus and Adonis dedications. An explicit count of vocabulary and the order of themes matches closely the known Shakespearean dedications, but there also appears to be a more general matching of rhetorical manner with regard to some words, for example, the FE dedication has

 

“Yet whatsoever is here done, is done to him and to him only. For whom and whose sake I will not forget to remember any friendly respects to you, or to any of those that have loved him for himself, and himself for his deserts.”

 

There is a great deal of repetition in Shakespeare in general, but in this particular case the repetition in connection with the word “respects” seems to amplify the solemnity of the occasion. Elsewhere Shakespeare seems to use repetition with “respects” in a similar manner, to amplify the seriousness of the speaker’s intent. For example:

 

Sonnet 49 1-9

 

Against that time, if ever that time come,

When I shall see thee frown on my defects,

When as thy love hath cast his utmost sum,

Call'd to that audit by advised respects;

Against that time when thou shalt strangely pass

And scarcely greet me with that sun thine eye,

When love, converted from the thing it was,

Shall reasons find of settled gravity,—

Against that time do I ensconce me here

 

[repetition of “against that time”, “that time”, “when” and “that”]

 

Merry Wives of Windsor 5.5.4-11

 

O powerful love! that, in some

respects, makes a beast a man, in some other, a man

a beast. You were also, Jupiter, a swan for the love

of Leda. O omnipotent Love! how near the god drew

to the complexion of a goose! A fault done first in

the form of a beast. O Jove, a beastly fault! And

then another fault in the semblance of a fowl; think

on 't, Jove; a foul fault!

 

[repetition of “man”, “beast”, “love”, “fault”, “Jove”, “foul/fowl”]

 

All’s Well That Ends Well 2.5.58-69

 

You must not marvel, Helen, at my course,

Which holds not colour with the time, nor does

The ministration and required office

On my particular. Prepared I was not

For such a business; therefore am I found

So much unsettled: this drives me to entreat you

That presently you take our way for home;

And rather muse than ask why I entreat you,

For my respects are better than they seem

And my appointments have in them a need

Greater than shows itself at the first view

To you that know them not.

 

[repetition of “not”, “I”, “you”, “my”, “entreat”, ”them”]

 

The repetition in the FE dedication matches closely the compressed repetition in the Lucrece dedication, e.g., “What I have done is yours, what I have to do is yours, being part in all I have, devoted yours.”, “without end”/”without beginning” etc., and also in the dedication to Venus and Adonis, e.g., “...I leave it to your Honorable survey, and your Honor to your heart’s content, which I wish may always answer your own wish....”, “world” etc.

 

Have there been any recent publications promoting Shakespeare’s authorship of part or all of “A Funeral Elegy”?

 

Jim Carroll

New in Scholarly Papers for Comments: “Catananche caerulea – A New Identification of the Love Potion Flower in A Midsummer Night’s Dream”

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 23.0271  Tuesday, 26 June 2012

 

From:        Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         Tuesday, June 26, 2012

Subject:     New in Scholarly Papers for Comments: “Catananche caerulea – A New Identification of the Love Potion Flower in A Midsummer Night’s Dream

 

As a service to its members, SHAKSPER makes selected papers for which the author would like comments available for a time on the SHAKSPER server at the Scholarly Papers for Comments section: http://shaksper.net/scholarly-resources/scholarly-papers-for-comments

 

The following essay has just been uploaded to the Scholarly Papers for Comments section of the web site: “Catananche caerulea – A New Identification of the Love Potion Flower in A Midsummer Night’s Dream.”  By J.D. Markel <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>.

 

ABSTRACT: This essay asserts that the aphrodisiac plant in A Midsummer Night’s Dream, heretofore identified as Viola tricolor, is actually Catananche caerulea, commonly known as Cupid’s dart.  Additionally, this essay argues the flower that grows from the blood of Adonis in Ovid’s Metamorphoses, heretofore identified as an anemone, is also Catananche caerulea It is further argued that the flower that grows from the blood of Adonis in Shakespeare’s poem Venus and Adonis, usually identified as an anemone, is actually Viola tricolor.

 

You should send your comments directly to the author J.D. Markel <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>; or if you wish, you may start a thread through the normal SHAKSPER channels by sending it to the list at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Folger Shakespeare Library Macbeth with DVD of Teller/Posner Production

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 23.0270  Tuesday, 26 June 2012

 

From:        Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         Tuesday, June 26, 2012

Subject:     Folger Shakespeare Library Macbeth with DVD of Teller/Posner Production

 

The pervious post, regarding the E-Book versions of the Folger Shakespeare Library editions, reminded me of the promise of a DVD version of the Teller/Posner Macbeth I saw at the Folger Elizabethan Theatre some years ago. 

 

A search of Amazon.com revealed that the DVD was packaged with the Folger Library paperback edition in late 2009 as Macbeth: The DVD Edition (Folger Shakespeare Library) [Paperback].

 

From Amazon: 

 

Macbeth: The DVD Edition includes everything you’ve come to expect from the Folger Shakespeare Library editions of Shakespeare’s plays—facing-page explanatory notes, scene-by-scene plot summaries, illustrations from the Folger archives—combined here with a bonus DVD of a performance of Macbeth recorded before a rapt audience in the Folger’s intimate Elizabethan Theatre. Conceived and directed by Teller (of Penn & Teller) and Aaron Posner, this acclaimed production showcases the inventive magic of Teller, who, with Posner, contributes a new foreword to this edition, writing about their vision of the play as a “supernatural horror thriller.” Macbeth: The DVD Edition is the perfect volume for those encountering the play for the first time and for those finding brilliant new insights into a classic.

 

This Edition Includes:

 

• DVD of the 2008 Folger Theatre/Two River Theater Company production—with over 50 minutes of special features, including interviews with the directors, actors, designers, and scholars

• Foreword by directors Teller and Aaron Posner on the staging of Macbeth

• Freshly edited text based on the 1623 First Folio

• Full explanatory notes conveniently placed on pages facing the text of the play

• A key to the play's famous lines and phrases

• An introduction to reading Shakespeare’s language in Macbeth

• Illustrations from the Folger Shakespeare Library’s vast holdings of rare books

• An essay by Susan Snyder that provides a modern perspective on the play

 

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