Yale Repertory Theatre to Mount Hamlet in 2013

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 23.0241  Wednesday, 13 June 2012

 

[1] From:        John Crowley <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

     Date:         June 12, 2012 10:33:50 AM EDT

     Subject:     Re: SHAKSPER: Yale Hamlet 

 

[2] From:        Hannibal Hamlin <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

     Date:         June 12, 2012 1:08:52 PM EDT

     Subject:     Re: SHAKSPER: Yale Hamlet 

 

[3] From:        Charles Weinstein <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

     Date:         June 12, 2012 2:30:35 PM EDT

     Subject:     RE: SHAKSPER: Yale Hamlet 

 

[4] From:        Brian Willis <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

     Date:         June 12, 2012 7:50:25 PM EDT

     Subject:     Re: SHAKSPER: Yale Hamlet

 

[5] From:        Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

     Date:         Wednesday, June 13, 2012

     Subject:     Yale Hamlet 

 

 

[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------

From:        John Crowley <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         June 12, 2012 10:33:50 AM EDT

Subject:     Re: SHAKSPER: Yale Hamlet

 

I’m very much looking forward to Giamatti as Hamlet. He will (for one thing) provide support for that famous reading “Oh that this too, too solid flesh would melt”—and any strange Hamlet is illuminating. (I saw Diane Venora in a Joseph Papp production many years ago—I wept.)

 

John Crowley

 

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------

From:        Hannibal Hamlin <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         June 12, 2012 1:08:52 PM EDT

Subject:     Re: SHAKSPER: Yale Hamlet

 

Paul Giamatti may be a little lumpy-dumpy, but so is Simon Russell Beale, who was apparently brilliant in the role. As for the baldness, Richard Burbage, the first Hamlet, seems to have quite a receding hairline in the Dulwich portrait, though I don’t know how old he was when painted. He would have been 33 when Hamlet premiered, but people aged differently back then. (Remember the Sonnets, “When forty winters have besieged thy brows”). Ian Charleson was apparently a superb Hamlet at 40. Olivier was 41 when he played Hamlet in his own film (though I confess I dislike it). Gielgud played the role at 44. Hamlet’s own age is notoriously hard to pin down: he’s a student at Wittenberg, but the gravedigger says he’s 30. He seems to age 10 or more years over the course of the play. Giamatti is a brilliant actor, which is surely the main thing. I’m sure his Hamlet will be worth seeing, and I hope I can get to New Haven when it’s up.

 

Hannibal

 

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------

From:        Charles Weinstein <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         June 12, 2012 2:30:35 PM EDT

Subject:     RE: SHAKSPER: Yale Hamlet

 

I thought there could never be a worse Hamlet than Simon Russell Beale, but Giamatti may yet prove me wrong. He’s a schlub, which Hamlet is not. (Neither, for that matter, was John Adams, which is why Giamatti was bad in that role as well).

 

--Charles Weinstein

 

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------

From:        Brian Willis <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         June 12, 2012 7:50:25 PM EDT

Subject:     Re: SHAKSPER: Yale Hamlet

 

“Call me old-fashioned, but if I were casting Hamlet I would try to find a skillful young fellow with leading-man looks and some star quality to do that heavy lifting. Paul Giamatti has neither and he’s forty-five. Indeed, his balding lumpy-dumpy look is plainly part of why he’s cast in the movie roles he gets. He has trunks full of awards, so it doesn’t matter that I usually don’t much care to watch him, but unless you can tell me he has a way with Shakespeare’s verse unmatched in the English-speaking world, I’m not really interested in seeing him play Hamlet anywhere.”

 

Has it come to this? Do we really require our actors to have “leading-man” looks, whatever that is supposed to mean? I thought being an actor - let me clarify, being a GREAT actor—is so much more than this. By this criteria, John Gielgud had no business playing Hamlet.

 

Let me add my own generalization: I usually find that actors with “leading-man looks” can’t handle the text because they rely on their looks, while actors like Giamatti, Phillip Seymour Hoffman, Simon Russell Beale all invest a great amount of time, intellect, and emotional capital into their roles and know the scripts backwards and forwards. Give me the latter every time.

 

Brian Willis

 

[5]-------------------------------------------------------------

From:        Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         Wednesday, June 13, 2012

Subject:     Yale Hamlet

 

As soon as this thread began, I was reminded of the discussion years back of the Simon Russell Beale's Hamlet. I am not disappointed.

 

I am also interested in how the “real” Hamlets (i.e., fixed and stable) are known, except through performance.

 

Hardy

 

Stratford-upon-Avon Lodgings

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 23.0240  Wednesday, 13 June 2012

 

[1] From:        Sheri Karmiol <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

     Date:         June 12, 2012 12:03:10 PM EDT

     Subject:     Re: SHAKSPER: Stratford Lodgings 

 

[2] From:        Evelyn Gajowski <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

     Date:         June 12, 2012 1:41:00 PM EDT

     Subject:     RE: SHAKSPER: Stratford Lodgings 

 

 

[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------

From:        Sheri Karmiol <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         June 12, 2012 12:03:10 PM EDT

Subject:     Re: SHAKSPER: Stratford Lodgings

 

We stayed at the Curtain Call. It was a bit of a walk to the theaters, but it was quite a pleasant walk in the evening. The room was very clean and the hosts offered to pick us up at the station (we chose to walk) and at the theatre (again we chose to walk).  They did drive us to the rail station when we left. 

 

The Curtain Call is closer to the rail station than to the theaters and village center, but that also meant it was less expensive. They do have a website, and I found that the photos on their website were more honest and less photoshopped than many of the other B & B’s where we stated in England and Scotland last summer.

 

Best, 

Sheri

 

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------

From:        Evelyn Gajowski <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         June 12, 2012 1:41:00 PM EDT

Subject:     RE: SHAKSPER: Stratford Lodgings

 

For Don Weingust –

 

Generally, B&Bs are more economical than hotels but do not have conveniences such as elevators. I love Broadlands Guest House—a short walk from the Shakespeare Institute, comfortable beds, wonderful hospitality, hearty breakfasts.  The only problem is that it had advertised Internet access in the past, but that meant dial-up, not Wi-Fi, and my laptop could not connect to it.  So I had to rely on the Internet access offered by the Institute.  Also, if you don’t request an en-suite room, you might get stuck on the top floor with a bathroom across the hall.

 

Evelyn Gajowski

University of Nevada, Las Vegas

USA

 

HamletWorks

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 23.0239  Wednesday, 13 June 2012

 

From:        Nicholas Clary <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         June 12, 2012 9:09:07 AM EDT

Subject:     HamletWorks

 

For about a week the HamletWorks site was down while we redirected the domain to a different and much quicker server. It is back up and running now at the hamletworks.org site. 

 

Nick Clary

 

CFP: This Rough Magic

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 23.0238  Wednesday, 13 June 2012

 

From:        Michael Boecherer <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         June 12, 2012 8:34:10 AM EDT

Subject:     CFP: This Rough Magic

 

This Rough Magic (www.thisroughmagic.org) is a journal dedicated to the art of teaching Medieval and Renaissance Literature. We are seeking academic, teachable articles that focus on, but are not limited to, the following categories:

  • Authorship
  • Genre Issues
  • Narrative Structure
  • Poetry
  • Drama
  • Epic
  • Nation/Empire/Class
  • Economics
  • History
  • Religion
  • Superstition
  • Philosophy and Rhetoric
  • Race/Ethnicity
  • Multi-Culturalism
  • Gender
  • Sexuality
  • Art

We also seek short essays that encourage faculty to try overlooked, non-traditional texts inside the classroom and book reviews.

 

Submission deadline for our Winter 2012 issue is currently October 1st, 2012.

 

For more information, please visit our website www.thisroughmagic.org or contact Michael Boecherer (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.).

 

Faculty and Graduate Students are encouraged to submit.

 

This Rough Magic's editorial board members are affiliated with the following academic institutions and organizations:

  • The American Shakespeare Center
  • Bridgewater State University
  • The Catholic University of America
  • Fitchburg State University
  • Newman University
  • State University of New York - Stony Brook
  • Suffolk County Community College
  • University of Connecticut
  • Vassar College

Michael Boecherer

Department of English

Suffolk County Community College - Riverhead Campus

Telephone: 631-548-2587

www.thisroughmagic.org

 

Yale Repertory Theatre to Mount Hamlet in 2013

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 23.0237  Tuesday, 12 June 2012

 

[1] From:        Conrad Bishop <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

     Date:         June 11, 2012 3:40:44 PM EDT

     Subject:     Re: Yale Ham 

 

[2] From:        Robert Projansky <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

     Date:         June 12, 2012 5:51:05 AM EDT

     Subject:     Re: Yale Ham 

 

 

[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------

From:        Conrad Bishop <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         June 11, 2012 3:40:44 PM EDT

Subject:     Re: Yale Ham

 

>But somehow I cannot picture him as Hamlet.  John Adams, sure. 

>Hamlet? Not so much. I wondered how others viewed this particular 

>casting.

 

It’s the production that will make that determination.  And I think casting is a much more powerful illuminator of the potentials of a text than any sort of period costuming, etc.

 

Only thing I could say is to suggest a productive way to look at casting in general. Perhaps for most directors, there exists an image of the character in mind, and the call goes out to whomever seems best to fit that image.

 

If I’m casting a role, I take a different approach.  Assuming the actor has the basic technique and seems like a good collaborator, I try to see what the role would be with him in it, what questions it would bring up - e.g. what illuminations or strains would it put on the whole play to have a Willy Loman with the characteristics of Lee J. Cobb, Dustin Hoffman, Brian Dennehy, or Philip S. Hoffman (all successful, all radically different)?

 

From what little I know of Giamatti’s work (2 films), he might bring an “ordinariness” to the Prince that would bring the political struggle of the play into a stronger balance than the star-vehicle aura usually projected.  Not hard to imagine Olivier’s Hamlet assassinating a king, much more interesting to imagine the throes of confusion, cowardice, spurts of rage and madness that would beset a less “princely” guy.  We tend to take our image of Hamlet from Ophelia’s “O what a noble mind . . . ” speech, but she may not be the most objective judge of that.  Hamlet certainly has great monologs, but for all his hair-splitting logic he’s a pretty conventional thinker.  In any case, Hamlet is a man who clearly feels he’s radically unsuited for his role, and I could see that powerfully in play with this casting.

 

That said, we’ll see.

 

Cheers-

Conrad

 

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------

From:        Robert Projansky <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         June 12, 2012 5:51:05 AM EDT

Subject:     Re: Yale Ham

 

Marilyn A. Bonomi reports that Paul Giamatti is to play Hamlet in the spring at the Yale Repertory Theater and wonders how others view this casting. 

 

Call me old-fashioned, but if I were casting Hamlet I would try to find a skillful young fellow with leading-man looks and some star quality to do that heavy lifting. Paul Giamatti has neither and he’s forty-five. Indeed, his balding lumpy-dumpy look is plainly part of why he’s cast in the movie roles he gets. He has trunks full of awards, so it doesn’t matter that I usually don’t much care to watch him, but unless you can tell me he has a way with Shakespeare’s verse unmatched in the English-speaking world, I’m not really interested in seeing him play Hamlet anywhere. 

 

Of course, taste in actors is much like taste in other things (that’s why they have chocolate and vanilla), and obviously the artistic director of the Yale Rep (who is also dean of the Yale School of Drama) sees other merits in him. In addition to his appeal as a local boy, Paul Giamatti has a Yale College BA, a Yale School of Drama MFA, is a member of masters-of-all-creation secret society Skull and Bones, and is a son of the late baseball commissioner Bart Giamatti, former president of Yale University. Go figure. 

 

Best to all

Bob Projansky

 

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