New in Scholarly Papers for Comments: “Catananche caerulea – A New Identification of the Love Potion Flower in A Midsummer Night’s Dream”

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 23.0271  Tuesday, 26 June 2012

 

From:        Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         Tuesday, June 26, 2012

Subject:     New in Scholarly Papers for Comments: “Catananche caerulea – A New Identification of the Love Potion Flower in A Midsummer Night’s Dream

 

As a service to its members, SHAKSPER makes selected papers for which the author would like comments available for a time on the SHAKSPER server at the Scholarly Papers for Comments section: http://shaksper.net/scholarly-resources/scholarly-papers-for-comments

 

The following essay has just been uploaded to the Scholarly Papers for Comments section of the web site: “Catananche caerulea – A New Identification of the Love Potion Flower in A Midsummer Night’s Dream.”  By J.D. Markel <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>.

 

ABSTRACT: This essay asserts that the aphrodisiac plant in A Midsummer Night’s Dream, heretofore identified as Viola tricolor, is actually Catananche caerulea, commonly known as Cupid’s dart.  Additionally, this essay argues the flower that grows from the blood of Adonis in Ovid’s Metamorphoses, heretofore identified as an anemone, is also Catananche caerulea It is further argued that the flower that grows from the blood of Adonis in Shakespeare’s poem Venus and Adonis, usually identified as an anemone, is actually Viola tricolor.

 

You should send your comments directly to the author J.D. Markel <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>; or if you wish, you may start a thread through the normal SHAKSPER channels by sending it to the list at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Folger Shakespeare Library Macbeth with DVD of Teller/Posner Production

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 23.0270  Tuesday, 26 June 2012

 

From:        Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         Tuesday, June 26, 2012

Subject:     Folger Shakespeare Library Macbeth with DVD of Teller/Posner Production

 

The pervious post, regarding the E-Book versions of the Folger Shakespeare Library editions, reminded me of the promise of a DVD version of the Teller/Posner Macbeth I saw at the Folger Elizabethan Theatre some years ago. 

 

A search of Amazon.com revealed that the DVD was packaged with the Folger Library paperback edition in late 2009 as Macbeth: The DVD Edition (Folger Shakespeare Library) [Paperback].

 

From Amazon: 

 

Macbeth: The DVD Edition includes everything you’ve come to expect from the Folger Shakespeare Library editions of Shakespeare’s plays—facing-page explanatory notes, scene-by-scene plot summaries, illustrations from the Folger archives—combined here with a bonus DVD of a performance of Macbeth recorded before a rapt audience in the Folger’s intimate Elizabethan Theatre. Conceived and directed by Teller (of Penn & Teller) and Aaron Posner, this acclaimed production showcases the inventive magic of Teller, who, with Posner, contributes a new foreword to this edition, writing about their vision of the play as a “supernatural horror thriller.” Macbeth: The DVD Edition is the perfect volume for those encountering the play for the first time and for those finding brilliant new insights into a classic.

 

This Edition Includes:

 

• DVD of the 2008 Folger Theatre/Two River Theater Company production—with over 50 minutes of special features, including interviews with the directors, actors, designers, and scholars

• Foreword by directors Teller and Aaron Posner on the staging of Macbeth

• Freshly edited text based on the 1623 First Folio

• Full explanatory notes conveniently placed on pages facing the text of the play

• A key to the play's famous lines and phrases

• An introduction to reading Shakespeare’s language in Macbeth

• Illustrations from the Folger Shakespeare Library’s vast holdings of rare books

• An essay by Susan Snyder that provides a modern perspective on the play

 

Folger Shakespeare Editions as E-Books

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 23.0269  Tuesday, 26 June 2012

 

From:        Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         Tuesday, June 26, 2012

Subject:     Folger Shakespeare Editions as E-Books

 

Yesterday’s New York Times contained an announcement that the Folger Shakespeare editions will be available in e-book format. 

 

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http://www.nytimes.com/2012/06/25/books/folger-shakespeares-in-e-book-format.html?_r=1&emc=eta1

 

June 24, 2012

 

Folger Shakespeares in E-Book Format

By Julie Bosman

 

The Folger Shakespeare Library editions will be available in e-book format for the first time beginning Monday. Known as one of the most popular and accessible editions of Shakespeare’s works, they feature scene summaries and notes and are frequently used in schools. Simon & Schuster said it collaborated with the Folger Shakespeare Library to create the e-books. The e-books, including “Hamlet,” “Julius Caesar” and “The Merchant of Venice,” will be sold for $5.99 each. “Shakespeare’s plays are one of the true landmarks in English writing, and the Folger editions have always served to make accessible, authoritative editions of the plays available to a broad sweep of the reading and playgoing public,” Michael Witmore, the director of the Folger Shakespeare Library, said in a statement. “The arrival of Folger Editions as e-books extends the reach of this invaluable series even further.”

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I when back and located the original Folger Shakespeare Library’s press release, issued on May 17, 2012: http://www.folger.edu//pr_preview.cfm?prid=307&is_archived=0&printout=1

 

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 “The most widely used electronic version of the plays—the Globe Edition (1864)—is over a century old, and I believe the Folger Editions will take its place as the electronic edition of record for Shakespeare’s plays.”

 

— Michael Witmore, Director, Folger Shakespeare Library

 

The Folger Shakespeare Library, in co-operation with Simon & Schuster, is pleased to announce the release of the texts of its celebrated Folger Shakespeare Editions. The texts of the plays themselves, minus glosses, notes and interpretive material, will be available free for non-commercial use. Full Folger e-editions, with glosses and interpretative material, are currently for sale at the Simon & Schuster website.

 

“The Folger Editions are a landmark in textual editing: produced to the highest standards of scholarship, they have been a trusted source for Shakespeare’s texts since their introduction in 1992,” explains Folger Director Michael Witmore. “We are delighted that we will soon make the complete text of every play, minus interpretive apparatus, available to anyone with a web connection. The most widely used electronic version of the plays—the Globe Edition (1864)—is over a century old, and I believe the Folger Editions will take its place as the electronic edition of record for Shakespeare’s plays.”

 

The #1 Shakespeare text used in American classrooms, the Folger Editions are designed to make Shakespeare’s plays and poems available to all readers. They provide accurate texts in modern spelling and punctuation. Completely re-edited, each text is based directly on what the editors, Barbara A. Mowat and Paul Werstine, consider the best early printed version of a particular play, poem, or collection of poems.

 

The most popular of Shakespeare’s plays will be available by the end of the summer of 2012. All of the plays will be posted by the end of 2013.

 

The availability of the Folger Editions texts opens up a range of uses, including online editions, classroom use, apps, scholarly research, and data mining.

 

Developers, editors, teachers, and others wishing to use the Folger Editions text should contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

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Information at the SimonandSchuster.com site indicates that the e-books may be purchased there and then used on a variety of platforms.

 

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Downloading and Reading eBooks from SimonandSchuster.com

 

It’s easy to buy and enjoy eBooks from SimonandSchuster.com.  

 

Our eBooks can be read on both Mac and PC, copied from your Mac or PC to select reading devices, as well as downloaded directly to iPad, iPod Touch, iPhone and a variety of Android devices.

 

Click below to navigate to the appropriate instructions:

  • Reading an eBook on a Mac or PC using Adobe(R) Digital Editions
  • Copying an eBook from a Mac or PC to reading devices using Adobe(R) Digital Editions
  • Opening an eBook directly on an iPad, iPod Touch, iPhone or Android device using Bluefire app

Launch: Issue 7.1. Borrowers and Lenders: The Journal of Shakespeare and Appropriation

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 23.0268  Tuesday, 26 June 2012

 

From:        Sujata Iyengar <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         June 25, 2012 4:41:01 PM EDT

Subject:     Launch: Issue 7.1. Borrowers and Lenders: The Journal of Shakespeare and Appropriation

 

The editors of the peer-reviewed, online, multimedia periodical Borrowers and Lenders: The Journal of Shakespeare and Appropriation (CELJ Winner, “Best New Journal,” 2007) are delighted to announce issue 7.1, which features Peter Holland’s plenary lecture from this year’s Shakespeare Association of America meeting (complete with film clips and high-resolution images); Giselle Rampaul’s essay on Shakespeare and King of the Masquerade; Brian Walsh’s discoveries about the Shakespeare windows in Southwark Cathedral (with illustrations); Regula Hohl Trillini’s exhaustive analysis of appropriations of Hamlet’s “To be, or not to be” speech; and book reviews by Julie Sanders and Lisa Bolding.

 

Please visit the journal (http://www.borrowers.uga.edu/), “like” our Facebook page, tell your friends, and consider sending us your own excellent work.

 

Best wishes,

Sujata Iyengar, Professor

Co-general editor of Borrowers and Lenders: The Journal of Shakespeare and Appropriation

Department of English

University of Georgia

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Shorthand Example (Egan, Davidson)

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 23.0267  Monday, 25 June 2012

 

From:        Gerald E. Downs <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         June 25, 2012 1:06:58 AM EDT

Subject:     Re: Shorthand Example (Egan, Davidson)

 

Steven Urkowitz responded to my shorthand example from Q1 Hamlet:

 

> I’d have us imagine that a certain playwright had . . . a

> sentence which . . . reads as if it is incomplete.

 

The Laertes sentence is complete enough; it doesn’t make any sense because it belongs to another scene.

 

> And I’d have us imagine that he disported this device at

> the occasional moment when he wanted to create a

 

We imagine that he used this device when we need to account for an insensible line to preserve the idea that Shakespeare designed Q1. But that kind of coincidence is highly improbable.

 

> So, in the instance cited below in a cut-and-paste from

> Gerald Downs’ post, I offer as a possible generative

> narrative that Shakespeare (himself, why not?)

 

Q1 is a very bad quarto. Shakespeare is not himself this time.

 

> “[By] My will, Not all the world [shall let my revenge].” with

> the “By” and the “shall let my revenge” being explained as

> implied,

 

“There shall be no let for revenge” means ‘no hindrance,’ In which case, “I don’t need no no hindrance” isn’t very sensible.

 

> such an explanation plausibly

 

Well, “plausibly” is bad argument if that’s all you have. We have Q2 telling a different story, where “My will . . .” fits.

 

> My point is that just because something illogical or

> ungrammatical appears in a text, we can’t just declare

 

It's not merely illogical and it's not ungrammatical. It's insensible and in the wrong place, demonstrably. Are we to suppose that Shakespeare rewrote the line later, this time to make sense?

 

Steven Urkowitz proposes an alternative to van Dam’s explication. But R. S. Crane observes that

 

> We must be guided . . . in choosing among alternative

> hypotheses [by] . . . economy: that hypothesis is the

> best . . . which requires the fewest supplementary

> hypotheses to make it work or which entails the least

> amount of explaining away.

 

I don’t know who Crane is, but that’s good advice. I got it from Steven’s

Shakespeare’s Revision of King Lear (148). Who’s ‘explaining away’ the evidence here? And who’s not counting ‘supplementary guesses’?

 

The fact is, playwrights write sensible dialogue most all the time (even Shakespeare!). When it isn’t, probability (math) says it’s corruption. The evidence agrees: transpositions (plenty more); borrowings; repetitions; you name it; etc. Q2 proves these things.

 

Gerald E. Downs

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