Peer Review

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 23.0325  Wednesday, 1 August 2012

 

From:        Larry Weiss <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         July 31, 2012 11:37:07 PM EDT

Subject:     Re: Peer/SHand

 

Gabriel Egan feels that “having previously advised a writer on their work [should not disqualify] a referee from reporting on the version presented to a journal, so long as the double-blind process is upheld.”  

 

I previously expressed my preference for a double-blind review process, because that system would minimize the influence that a writer’s reputation or lack thereof could have on the reviewer. Obviously, that goal is served by maintaining the anonymity of the writer; it is not important for that purpose that the reviewer’s identity be concealed.  Other desiderata are served by keeping the referee’s identity a secret from the writer, as the current system does, not the least of which is protecting him or her from the wrath of a rejected scholar. But it seems to me that fairness requires a reviewer at least to disclose to the journal any prior interaction with an author whose identity can reasonably be inferred, at least involvement with respect to the subject of the paper. That would allow the journal to select a different reviewer if it wished or to allow the writer a right of reply to a negative report.  It would be preferable, however, for referees to recuse themselves if they infer the identity of the author. Perhaps Gabriel, who wants a pure double-blind scheme, will agree.

 

Upcoming Hiatus

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 23.0324  Wednesday, 1 August 2012

 

From:        Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         Wednesday, August 1, 2012

Subject:     Upcoming Hiatus 

 

Dear SHAKSPER Subscribers,

 

On Saturday, I leave for my biennial trip to the UK. 

 

Whereas in the past I liked to spend a week in Stratford, a week in London, and a week in the countryside, this summer, in no small part to the Olympics, I am just going to the International Conference, so I will only be away for a week and will possibly have Internet access. Please keep submissions coming, but if you have something pressing to communicate, you probably should strive to submit it today or tomorrow. 

 

I look forward to seeing the renovated Memorial Theatre, even though I was a fan of the Courtyard where I saw the amazing Hamlet with David Tennant and Patrick Stewart and the equally amazing Henry 6 plays—that was a blood pack to remember at the end of 3H6.

 

Hardy

The Shakespeare Institute Review and CFP

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 23.0323  Wednesday, 1 August 2012

 

From:        Shakespeare Institute Review <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         July 31, 2012 5:24:58 PM EDT

Subject:     The Shakespeare Institute Review and CFP

 

Dear all,

 

The first issue of The Shakespeare Institute Review was successfully launched at the end of the recent BritGrad conference. The issue, which explores death and mortality in Shakespeare and showcases a marvellous range of contributions, can be found at this link: www.shakesreview.com . Following on from this, we warmly invite submissions for the second issue of the Review, an online academic journal to which postgraduate students of Shakespeare and related programmes are invited to contribute.

 

Please find attached the latest call for papers. Students are encouraged to submit papers between 1,500 and 2,000 words on topics relating to Shakespeare and the superhuman, with a deadline of 26 August 2012

 

Detailed style guidelines can be found here: www.shakesreview.com/style-guidelines.html . Selected submissions will be published in the second issue of the Review, to be launched in late 2012. Further details are in the attached document. Please share it with students of your and other departments who may be interested. If you have further questions or comments regarding the issue, mailing list, etc., please let us know by email at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or via the contact form on www.shakesreview.com .  

 

Yours faithfully,

The Editorial Board --

Giulia Sandelewski, Paul Hamilton and Thea Buckley

Shakespeare Institute doctoral research students 

 

CFP: The Shakespeare Institute Review

 

The Shakespeare Institute Review is an online academic journal funded by the Birmingham University College of Arts and Law, and to which students at the Shakespeare Institute and on other postgraduate programmes are encouraged to contribute. Each issue has a theme to which contributors are invited to respond.

 

Continuing on from the first issue of the journal, which explored death and mortality in Shakespeare, we thought it appropriate to segue into an examination of human limitations and the superhumans who transcend them. ‘Superhuman’ might refer to a ‘normal’ human, with otherwise unusual or exceptional skills, abilities, or powers, or to an ‘improved’ human, e.g. by genetic modification, etc. Students are therefore encouraged to submit papers between 1,500 and 2,000 words on topics relating to Shakespeare and the Superhuman. Possible topics might include, but are not restricted to:

 

  • Is our notion of superheroes Shakespearean? What place does the superhuman occupy in our collective imagination, from a metaphysical or spiritual standpoint? Why are we fascinated by, e.g., comics, or the Olympics? What psychological need does superhumanity answer; does the ‘super’ liberate us from human constraints? 

 

  • Critical examinations of Shakespeare’s magical, mythological, heroic, supernatural, psychic, etc., characters. In particular, we would be interested in papers on the idealised and idolised. This could include close reading, comparative analysis, etc.

 

  • Considerations of the political, ethical, religious, spiritual, and/or existential significance of the superhuman in the Early Modern period, and of how Shakespeare makes use of (and plays off) those conceptualisations in his works. 

 

  • More intensely personal and experientially engaged writing on how Shakespeare’s works have affected your understanding of what it means to be human, and what it means to be beyond human? Is it just a matter of possessing certain powers, or is it a quality of mind and attitude? How do we define humanity; where is the line between the human, the super, and/or the divine?

 

Papers should be submitted to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. , with a deadline of 26 August 2012. Please refer to the following style guidelines: www.shakesreview.com/style-guidelines.html

 

All submissions will be reviewed by the editorial board (Thea Buckley, Paul Hamilton, and Giulia Sandelewski), and those submissions that are selected will be published in our second online issue next term. For further information, please contact us at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

 

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