Forthcoming Screen Shakespeares

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 23.0421  Friday, 19 October 2012

 

From:        Hardy Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         October 19, 2012 9:08:17 AM EDT

Subject:     Forthcoming Screen Shakespeares

 

Below is a message I received from Mike Jensen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.> that I thought might be of interest to some SHAKSPEReans.

 

An article of forthcoming screen Shakespeares lurks behind this link: http://www.shortlist.com/entertainment/films/all-you-need-to-know-about-forthcoming-shakespeare-movies

 

All the best, 

Mike Jensen 

Author site: www.michaelpjensen.com

 

Book Announcement: Performing Early Modern Drama Today

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 23.0420  Friday, 19 October 2012

 

From:        Kathryn Prince <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         October 19, 2012 11:16:48 AM EDT

Subject:     Book Announcement: Performing Early Modern Drama Today

 

Pascale Aebischer and I are very pleased to announce the publication of our edited collection Performing Early Modern Drama Today. I thought that it might be of interest to SHAKESPER readers, so here is the blurb along with a link to some sample material and the table of contents.

 

While much attention has been devoted to performances of Shakespeare’s plays today, little has been focused on modern productions of the plays of his contemporaries, such as Marlowe, Webster and Jonson. Performing Early Modern Drama Today offers an overview of early modern performance, featuring chapters by academics, teachers and practitioners, incorporating a variety of approaches. The book examines modern performances in both Britain and America and includes interviews with influential directors, close analysis of particular stage and screen adaptations and detailed appendices of professional and amateur productions. Chapters examine intellectual and practical opportunities to analyse what is at stake when the plays of Shakespeare’s contemporaries are performed by ours. Whether experimenting with original performance practices or contemporary theatrical and cinematic ones, productions of early modern drama offer an inspiring, sometimes unusual, always interesting perspective on the plays they interpret for modern audiences.

 

http://www.cambridge.org/gb/knowledge/isbn/item6860640/?site_locale=en_GB

 

Best regards, and thanks for reading . . . 

Kathryn Prince

Département de théâtre / Department of Theatre

Université d'Ottawa / University of Ottawa

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Items for SHAKSPER Subscriber Survey

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 23.0419  Friday, 19 October 2012

From:        Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         Friday, October 19, 2012

Subject:     Items for SHAKSPER Subscriber Survey

 

Dear Subscribers,

 

SHAKSPER has been somewhat fallow of late.

 

It occurred to me that having a Subscriber Survey may be useful in helping me to determine if any changes in SHAKSPER services might be called for (more of something, less of something, other things).

 

Before I construct the survey, I thought that I would query SHAKSPER subscribers asking for possible items that I might include in such a survey.

 

If you have any suggestions about the daily digest and-or the SHAKSPER web services <http:shaksper.net> please reply and let me know. 

 

Your input will help me determine if a survey is called for and what I might include in it.

 

Best wishes,

Hardy M. Cook

Professor Emeritus Bowie State University Editor of SHAKSPER: The Global Electronic Shakespeare Conference <shaksper.net>   This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. (SHAKSPER) 

PS: The idea for a survey occurred to me after I attended Shakespeare Theatre Company’s The Government Inspector last evening at the Lansburgh Theatre. A busload of college students was brought in, seemingly to fill the seats and to provide a live “laugh track.” (I am still amazed that there are actual folks who say “like” every third word.) Anyway, I thought the production was dreadful, recycling the same shtick from other productions into the skeleton of this one, so much so that I was having deja vu moments during the entire evening. I could go on, but I don’t want to sounds as if my purpose is to trash STC, even though I think STC needs to hear my singular voice. But this morning in my inbox was an invitation to STC subscribers who attended last evening to respond to a survey. And respond I did. Well, so the idea—anyone providing a service should periodically receive feedback from those involved in it. 

Juliet is the Sun

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 23.0418  Thursday, 18 October 2012

 

From:        Larry Weiss <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         October 18, 2012 12:18:18 AM EDT

Subject:     Re: Juliet is the Sun

 

>I found Larry Weiss’s comment interesting

 

I am glad of it, . . .  (Ham, IV.ii.23-4)

Query: Winter’s Tale

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 23.0417  Thursday, 18 October 2012

 

From:        Robert Appelbaum <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         October 18, 2012 7:05:37 AM EDT

Subject:     Query: Winter’s Tale

 

Dear All:

 

I am studying the recent performance history of The Winter’s Tale, with a general interest in how the oracle scene is staged.

 

I am especially interested in one particular production, directed by David Farr in 2009, which played at the Courtyard Theatre, the Roundhouse, and an improvised theatre in NYC. In this play, apparently, when the oracle is pronounced a kind of earthquake shatters the scenery, including two towering bookcases which tumble – perhaps reminding the audience of the Twin Towers falling.

 

Has anyone out there seen one of these performances? Can anyone explain the exact sequence and effect of this scenery catastrophe? And does anyone know of similar or equally challenging staging effects from other productions?  I would be most interested to hear from you.

 

With regards,

Robert

 

Robert Appelbaum

Professor of English Literature

English Department

Uppsala University

Uppsala SE-751 20

http://www.engelska.uu.se/People/Appelbaum/

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Search

Make a Gift to SHAKSPER

Consider making a gift to support SHAKSPER.