ISE/Broadview Julius Caesar Published

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 23.0482  Friday, 30 November 2012

From:        Michael Best <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         Friday, November 30, 2012 2:25 PM

Subject:     ISE/Broadview Julius Caesar Published

 

It is with great pleasure that I write to let you know that the second play in the ISE/Broadview series has been published: John Cox’s Julius Caesar. Congratulations to John on a fine edition, and to Broadview for their usual attractive and professional book design.

 

You will find it in the Broadview catalogue here:

 

http://www.broadviewpress.com/product.php?productid=1088&cat=0&page=1

 

I’m pleased to say that the next plays in the series—Henry IV, Part One, Twelfth Night, Henry V, and The Winter’s Tale—are in various stages of review and preparation.

 

Cheers--

Michael Best

Coordinating Editor, Internet Shakespeare Editions

<http://internetshakespeare.uvic.ca/>

Department of English, University of Victoria

Victoria B.C. V8W 3W1, Canada.

 

[Editor’s Note: I have augmented Michael Best’s announcement below. Hardy]

 

Publisher’s Description:

 

Julius Caesar is a key link between Shakespeare’s histories and his tragedies. Unlike the Caesar drawn by Plutarch in a source text, Shakespeare’s Caesar is surprisingly modern: vulnerable and imperfect, a powerful man who does not always know himself. The open-ended structure of the play insists that revealing events will continue after the play ends, making the significance of the history we have just witnessed impossible to determine in the play itself.

 

John D. Cox’s introduction discusses issues of genre, characterization, and rhetoric, while also providing a detailed history of criticism of the play. Appendices provide excerpts from important related works by Lucretius, Plutarch, and Montaigne.

 

A collaboration between Broadview Press and the Internet Shakespeare Editions project at the University of Victoria, the editions developed for this series have been comprehensively annotated and draw on the authoritative texts newly edited for the ISE. This innovative series allows readers to access extensive and reliable online resources linked to the print edition.

 

John D. Cox is DuMez Professor of English at Hope College, Holland, Michigan, and has published widely on Shakespeare’s plays and other Renaissance drama.

 

Table of Contents:

 

Foreword

Acknowledgements

Introduction

Shakespeare’s Life

Shakespeare’s Theater

William Shakespeare and Julius Caesar: A Brief Chronology

A Note on the Texts

Characters in the Play

 

Julius Caesar

 

Appendix A: Plutarch's Lives

 

  1. from Life of Caesar
  2. from Life of Brutus
  3. from Life of Marcus Antonius

Appendix B: Montaigne on Stoicism and Epicurenism

 

Works Cited

 

Instructor Copies: Academics teaching relevant courses may request examination copies of titles to consider for text adoption. We ask that you limit your examination copy requests to three or fewer at a time; if you are not confident that you will adopt the book, please help us keep costs down by ordering it instead. If in the future you do decide to assign as a course text a book you have previously ordered personally, Broadview Press will be happy to refund your money.

 

Julius Caesar

A Broadview Internet Shakespeare Edition

Written by: William Shakespeare

Edited by: John D. Cox

280pp 

Paperback
ISBN: 9781554810505 / 1554810507

 

Now: CDN & US $13.95

In August: $15.95

 

Internet Shakespeare Editions edition: http://internetshakespeare.uvic.ca/Foyer/plays/JC.html

 

Shakespeare’s Globe Indoor Theater Update

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 23.0481  Thursday, 29 November 2012

 

From:        Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         Thursday, November 29, 2012

Subject:     Shakespeare’s Globe Indoor Theater Update

 

Below is from today’s New York Times:

 

http://artsbeat.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/11/27/shakespeares-globe-sets-2014-opening-date-for-indoor-theater/

 

November 27, 2012

Shakespeare’s Globe Sets 2014 Opening Date for Indoor Theater

By Patrick Healy

 

Leaders of the open-air Shakespeare’s Globe theater in London said on Tuesday that its new indoor theater space will open in January 2014 and be named for Sam Wanamaker, the American actor and director who led the decades-long effort to rebuild the Globe on the south bank of the Thames.

 

The new 340-seat theater will be designed in the Jacobean tradition, with perhaps the most notable touch being the candles that will light much of the space, according to the Globe’s artistic director, Dominic Dromgoole. The construction of the new Sam Wanamaker Theater is costing approximately £7.5 million, or about $12 million, and £6.5 million has been raised so far, a spokeswoman for the theater said.

 

The inaugural production for the new theater will be announced next year, the spokeswoman added. The space, which will have two tiers of galleried seating and a pit seating area, will feature Jacobean plays by Webster, Marlowe and Ford as well as works by Shakespeare.

 

While the Globe is a replica of the wooden open-air theater where some of Shakespeare’s plays were produced in the 16th century, the new theater space was envisioned by Wanamaker and others years ago to augment the Globe for Jacobean works that were performed indoors during the 16th and 17th centuries.

 

 [ . . . ]

Legacy of Richard III

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 23.0480  Wednesday, 28 November 2012

 

From:        John Briggs <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         November 27, 2012 3:40:03 PM EST

Subject:     Re: SHAKSPER: Legacy of Richard III

 

It has been suggested that the best evidence of these bones being Richard is that no horse was found buried with him . . .

 

John Briggs

Peter Holland to Receive 2012 Sheedy Award

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 23.0479  Wednesday, 28 November 2012

 

From:        Actors From The London Stage <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         November 28, 2012 12:18:33 PM EST

Subject:     Peter Holland to Receive 2012 Sheedy Award

 

The Sheedy Excellence in Teaching Award is presented annually to an outstanding teacher in the College of Arts and Letters [at Notre Dame College]. Professor Peter Holland is the 2012 Award Recipient. The Sheedy award was founded in 1970 in honor of Rev. Charles E. Sheedy, C.S.C., who served as dean of the College from 1951–69, and acknowledges a faculty member who has sustained excellence in research and instruction over a wide range of courses. This individual must also motivate and enrich students using innovative and creative teaching methods and influence teaching and learning within the department, College, and University.

Peter Holland, one of the central figures in performance-oriented Shakespeare criticism, served as Director of the Shakespeare Institute at Stratford-upon-Avon before coming to Notre Dame in 2002. He is editor of Shakespeare Survey as well as a number of other series. Among his books are English Shakespeares: Shakespeare on the English Stage in the 1990s and a major study of Restoration drama The Ornament of Action. He has also edited many Shakespeare plays, including A Midsummer Night's Dream for the Oxford Shakespeare series. In 2007, he completed publication of a five-volume series of collections of essays entitled Rethinking British Theatre History. In 2007-08, he served as President of the Shakespeare Association of America. He was elected an honorary fellow at Trinity Hall, his alma mater and one of the 31 colleges that comprise the University of Cambridge.

Legacy of Richard III

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 23.0478  Tuesday, 27 November 2012

 

From:        Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         Tuesday, November 27, 2012

Subject:     Legacy of Richard III

 

From Sunday’s Washington Post

 

http://www.washingtonpost.com/world/europe/in-england-discovery-of-possible-royal-grave-digs-up-twisted-legacy-of-richard-iii/2012/11/24/33c34570-3314-11e2-92f0-496af208bf23_story.html

 

Unverified Remains Dig Up the Twisted Legacy of England’s Richard III

By Anthony Faiola

November 24

 

LONDON — Tyrant or hero? Rightful monarch or childkiller? Despotic hunchback or brave scoliosis sufferer? Now is the winter of our debate over one of England’s most notorious villains: Richard III.

 

Underneath a drab parking lot 90 miles northwest of London, archaeologists have unearthed what may become one of this nation’s finds of the century — half-a-millennium-old bones thought to be the remains of the long-lost monarch. But if the discovery has touched off a feverish round of DNA tests against his closest living descendants, it has also lurched to the surface a series of burning questions in a country where even arcane points of history are disputed with the gusto of modern-day politics.

 

What was the true nature of a king famously depicted by William Shakespeare as a twisted soul who locked his young nephews — and rivals to the throne — in the Tower of London, never to be heard from again? Did Shakespeare offer a fair accounting of historical record, or was the Bard the Karl Rove of his day, a spin doctor for the House of Tudor that assumed power after the monarch fell with fateful cries of “Treason!” at the Battle of Bosworth in 1485?

 

Whether the bones prove to be Richard’s or not, the discovery in September has already set academic journals, Web sites, university lecture circuits and the mainstream media abuzz across Britain, sparking intense and occasionally impolite exchanges. On the floor of the House of Commons, members of Parliament are eloquently clashing, with representatives from York — for whom Richard was the last hope against rival Lancastrians in the War of the Roses — demanding the restoration of his tarnished image. One organization of die-hard Richard III supporters (there are at least two) is running a national ad campaign to clear the king’s name.

 

There are even calls for a state funeral, giving the medieval king a send-off steeped in the pomp and circumstance of contemporary Britain.

 

[ . . . ]

 

Where to lay the bones?

 

Yet if the remains are indeed those of the long-lost sovereign — something archaeologists call extremely likely — it also raises a conundrum: Where to bury one of England’s most demonized characters?

 

Under Church of England protocol, the bones, should they prove to be Richard’s, appear destined to end up in the cathedral at Leicester, the city where the remains were found. But many insist they should instead go to the Anglican cathedral in York, the city where history suggests that he wanted to rest. Still others question whether burial should be in an Anglican cathedral at all, as he died a Roman Catholic, reigning by the grace of God and the pope.

 

Some of his staunchest backers — who paint him pious, brave and unyieldingly loyal to England — suggest that he deserves nothing less than a spot at Westminster Abbey, an honored resting place of legendary historical figures. But that option seems to have been quickly nipped in the bud by Queen Elizabeth II, who owes her own arrival on the royal stage to a chain of events set off by Richard’s death, which changed the course of history.

 

[ . . . ]

 

Questioning Tudor history

 

That bones were found at all is a testament to the tenacity of Richard’s supporters. After his death, the king’s body was interred at a Leicester monastery and became buried in time and memory. But earlier this year, screenwriter and Richard III aficionado Philippa Langley cobbled together $52,000 to finance what become a single-minded ambition: finding his remains.

 

After comparing ancient maps and modern city plans, a team of archaeologists at Leicester University pinpointed possible locations of the old monastery and had a stroke of luck when the most likely site for Richard’s grave was found to be in a city parking lot. Spurred by the hope of tourism dollars, the city approved the dig, which in September uncovered the remains of a man — exactly where texts said the monarch was buried — who was of the right age and nourishment level and who had suffered battle trauma and spine damage.

 

DNA tests against a Canadian descendant of Richard’s eldest sister should be completed early next year. Yet even if the remains turn out not to be his, Richard III supporters have nevertheless already succeeded in provoking a nation to rethink his legacy.

 

“So much of what we know about him currently is wrong, and in the past we accepted the Tudor version of history unquestionably,” she said. “But not anymore.” 

 

Indeed, for historians and Shakespearean scholars the find has also dug up the centuries-old debate over a much-maligned monarch.

 

Experts say there are few objective depictions of Richard III from his reign. Rather, his legacy was built largely on “Tudor propaganda,” including Polydore Vergil’s landmark “Anglica Historia” and the works of John Rous, who assured the medieval world that Richard III had been born with teeth and hair after two years in his mother’s womb.

 

What is clear is this: After decades of war between rival houses, Richard III became the last king of England to fall on the battlefield, slain while defending his crown against a marauding upstart backed by France. That upstart, Henry VII, seeded a House of Tudor that over a century would break with the Vatican, humble mighty Spain and usher in a golden age of British arts, enlightenment and power.

 

Analysis of the bones may also suggest the extent to which Shakespeare and early historians — upon whose accounts the writer drew — took creative license with the king’s appearance. He was described in Shakespeare’s “Richard III” as a hunchback “so lamely and unfashionable that dogs” barked at him as he went by. But the remains found in Leicester instead suggest a man with a less-dramatic curvature of the spine, likely from scoliosis.

 

Even Richard III backers tend to acknowledge that he is guilty of locking up the “princes in the tower” — his two nephews, 12 and 9, who were declared illegitimate so he could seize the throne after the death of his brother Edward IV. But the scant, unclear evidence of their fate — especially whether he took the step of having them killed — is now facing its deepest scrutiny in the better part of 500 years.

 

[ . . . ]

 

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