Shakespeare’s Sense of Character-On the Page and From the Stage

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 24.0028  Sunday, 27 January 2013

 

From:        Kristen McDermott <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         January 22, 2013 8:41:43 AM EST

Subject:     RE: SHAKSPER: Book Announcement

 

Congratulations to Yu Jin and Michael from a fellow C.R.A.S.S. alum!

 

Kristen McDermott

Professor of English

Central Michigan University

 

Size of Touring Troupe in Gdansk, 1654

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 24.0027  Sunday, 27 January 2013

 

[1] From:        Paul Barry <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

     Date:         January 18, 2013 4:54:42 PM EST

     Subject:     Re: SHAKSPER: Touring Troupe Size 

 

[2] From:        JD Markel <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

     Date:         January 18, 2013 9:54:01 PM EST

     Subject:     Re: SHAKSPER: Touring Troupe Size 

 

 

[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------

From:        Paul Barry <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         January 18, 2013 4:54:42 PM EST

Subject:     Re: SHAKSPER: Touring Troupe Size

 

I’ve never played Gdansk, but the best production of AS YOU LIKE IT I ever saw was Robin Phillips’ Stratford production which was performed by 16 actors.

 

The second best production was the one that ACTER toured in the 1980s

with five actors, three men and two women. They were dynamite, but you had to know the play or the doubling was confusing.

 

Paul Barry 

 

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------

From:        JD Markel <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         January 18, 2013 9:54:01 PM EST

Subject:     Re: SHAKSPER: Touring Troupe Size

 

“a troupe’s 1654 petition for permission to play in the purpose-built playhouse designed to accommodate touring English actors, a building known as the Gdansk Fencing School.”

 

I found it curious that a “purpose built” structure would be called the “Gdansk Fencing School” because my first thought would be that a fencing school could be a good place for performances. I recently (yesterday) attended a very interesting lecture about Baroque dance which dealt in part with the close interrelationship of Baroque dance and fencing. In schools, using French and Spanish examples, the fencing teacher was always also the dance instructor. Baroque dance is quite performative and it could be set up for observers. I can imagine that a “fencing school” might have spaces for performance of fencing and dancing. But this is really out of my league, I just went to the lecture to kill time before a basketball game. But it seemed to me the dance savvy audience was generally previously unaware of the dancing-fencing connection. 

 

Open Source Shakespeare Search Statistics

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 24.0026  Sunday, 27 January 2013

 

From:        Eric Johnson <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         January 23, 2013 5:25:27 PM EST

Subject:     Open Source Shakespeare Search Statistics

 

Hello, list members -- 

 

In late September, Open Source Shakespeare started logging all of the searches performed on the site. So far, it has compiled over 255,000 search requests, or about 2,000 per day. The logs can show patterns of how people search Shakespeare’s corpus. Here are a few nuggets: 

  • Hamlet is the most-searched work, which isn’t a surprise—but it is searched more than 60% as frequently as the runner-up, Macbeth
  • Othello (#3) is searched considerably more than secondary-school fixture Romeo and Juliet (#4). 
  • Nobody likes poor “Phoenix and the Turtle” (admittedly, it’s so short, you don’t really need to search within it), and the other non-sonnet poems languish at the bottom of the list. “Two Gents” is the least-searched play. 
  • Romantics will be pleased to find that “love” is the most-searched keyword. 
  • Previously, I had assumed that at least 90% of the search requests were simple keyword searches, because that is the normal proportion for on-site search functions. However, it turns out the searches are split much more evenly between simple and advanced requests (about 46% specify a particular work, which means it is an advanced search). 

You can see the list of most-searched works here: 

http://opensourceshakespeare.org/stats/works-searches.php 

 

 . . . and the most-searched keywords here: 

http://opensourceshakespeare.org/stats/text-searches.php

 

And here’s a brief update of where the site stands, since so many of you have offered critiques and comments over the years. Open Source Shakespeare was announced on SHAKSPER in February 2004, and has grown into one of the more popular sites of its kind. Since June 2006, OSS has attracted 3.7 million unique visitors and 20.8 million page views. In the last year alone, it hosted over 1.1 million visitors and 5.4 million page views. When you search for the keyword “shakespeare” in Google, OSS is now in the first page of search results (it’s at #10, at least as I type this, although it sometimes falls off to #11). 

 

The site was donated to the George Mason University’s English Department, where we are working to expand its capabilities. More updates will be forthcoming soon. Thanks to everyone who has contributed suggestions in the past, and please keep new ones coming to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

Regards,

Eric Johnson

 

[Editor's Note: Congratulations, Eric, on the success of your project. We all appreciate having it available. -Hardy]

A Special Evening with Julie Taymor

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 24.0025  Sunday, 27 January 2013

 

From:        John F Andrews <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         January 23, 2013 12:17:01 PM EST

Subject:     A Special Evening with Julie Taymor

 

A Special Evening with Julie Taymor

    

Monday, January 28, at 6:00 p.m., $15   

Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts

3 Spruce Street in Lower Manhattan

Visit www.pace.edu/schimmel/box-office

Call 866-811-4111 or 212-346-1715

 

Best known for The Lion King, which opened on Broadway in 1997 and has now become a global phenomenon, JULIE TAYMOR is the recipient of dozens of prestigious honors, among them two Tony Awards for that show alone. She is renowned not only for her unique approach to drama (most recently as director and writer of the book for another hit musical, Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark) but for her achievements in cinema and opera, among them an acclaimed Magic Flute at the Met. Outgrowths of her pioneering early work with Theatre for a New Audience include riveting film adaptations of Titus Andronicus (starring Anthony Hopkins and Jessica Lange) and The Tempest (with Helen Mirren as Prospera). Ms. Taymor has also garnered two Academy Awards and six Oscar nominations for Frida, a feature she directed with Salma Hayek in the title role. She’ll discuss her remarkable career with the Shakespeare Guild’s John Andrews and Pace University’s Cosmin Chivu in a “Masters Series” setting that will be familiar to TV audiences who enjoy Inside the Actors Studio.                  

___________________

 

For more information about The Shakespeare Guild, and for details about upcoming attractions (among them a February 25 program about Words from the White House with lexicographer Paul Dickson at the National Arts Club, and a May 23 gathering at The Players with painter Everett Raymond Kinstler, whose portrayals of stars like Tony Bennett, Katharine Hepburn, and Tom Wolfe have led admirers to compare him with the legendary John Singer Sargent), visit www.shakesguild.org 

 

CFP: Diversity and Homogeneity

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 24.0024  Sunday, 27 January 2013

 

From:        Agnieszka Rasmus <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         January 20, 2013 3:27:47 AM EST

Subject:     Call for Papers

 

Call for Papers

Diversity and Homogeneity:

The Politics of Nation, Class, and Gender in Drama, Theatre, Film and Media

Including a Shakespeare Day

25-27 October 2013

 

The Department of Drama and Pre-1800 Literature and the International Shakespeare Centre at the University of Łódź invite you to attend the 7th Biannual “Drama Through the Ages and Medieval Literature Conference”. 

 

The organizers wish to address the dynamics of the binary opposite of diversity and homogeneity. The democratic culture of the West, often seeing itself as the carrier of global standards, is ideologically paradoxical in itself. On the one hand, its fundamental premise is the freedom of each individual, which should seemingly embrace diversity and nourish difference as society’s organizing principle. On the other, however, its practice is to normalise people’s behaviour and effectively marginalise individuals that do not conform to the legal norms set by the majority, in effect creating a homogeneously sanitised and orderly society.

 

The aim of the conference is to look at how issues connected with the politics of nation, class, and gender are rendered in drama, theatre, film and media. Particular attention will be paid to the problem of multiculturalism, nationalism, social hierarchies, minorities, and identity.

 

As one conference day will be devoted exclusively to the analysis of the above thematic areas in the context of Shakespearean studies, we wish to extend the invitation to Shakespearean scholars wanting to address the issues of the politics of nation, class and gender in Shakespeare’s dramatic output as well as in contemporary reworkings of his plays in theatre, film and media.

 

Topics might include (but are not limited to): 

    * the politics of cultural/national/gender/religious/ethnic identity

    * the politics of recognition

    * the global – the national – the local

    * sexual politics 

    * gender politics

    * the politics of nation, class and gender in Shakespeare

 

We are pleased to announce the following keynote speakers:

Professor Judith Buchanan, University of York

Professor Christy Desmet, University of Georgia

Doctor Imke Lichterfeld, University of Bonn

Professor Ewa Mazierska, University of Central Lancashire

Professor Barbara Ozieblo, University of Málaga

Professor Kay Stanton,  California State University, Fullerton.

 

All abstracts (maximum of 350 words) must contain the title of the proposed paper, the name of the author and contact information (institutional affiliation, mailing address and email address). Abstracts should be submitted before no later than June 1st 2013. Selected papers will be published in a post-conference volume. 

 

Conference fee: 400 PLN for academics holding positions at Polish Universities, 120 Euro for delegates based outside of Poland, and reduced fee of 150 PLN for doctoral students. The fee covers conference materials, lunches, coffee and snacks, and conference reception. 

 

Honorary Organisers:

Prof. Krystyna Kujawińska-Courtney

Prof. Jadwiga Uchman

Prof. Andrzej Wicher

Organising Committee: 

dr Magdalena Cieślak

dr Agnieszka Rasmus

dr Monika Sosnowska

 

Please, send your abstracts or submit queries to:

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

For updated information about the conference see:

lodzoct2013.wordpress.com

 

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