A Special Evening with Julie Taymor

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 24.0025  Sunday, 27 January 2013

 

From:        John F Andrews <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         January 23, 2013 12:17:01 PM EST

Subject:     A Special Evening with Julie Taymor

 

A Special Evening with Julie Taymor

    

Monday, January 28, at 6:00 p.m., $15   

Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts

3 Spruce Street in Lower Manhattan

Visit www.pace.edu/schimmel/box-office

Call 866-811-4111 or 212-346-1715

 

Best known for The Lion King, which opened on Broadway in 1997 and has now become a global phenomenon, JULIE TAYMOR is the recipient of dozens of prestigious honors, among them two Tony Awards for that show alone. She is renowned not only for her unique approach to drama (most recently as director and writer of the book for another hit musical, Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark) but for her achievements in cinema and opera, among them an acclaimed Magic Flute at the Met. Outgrowths of her pioneering early work with Theatre for a New Audience include riveting film adaptations of Titus Andronicus (starring Anthony Hopkins and Jessica Lange) and The Tempest (with Helen Mirren as Prospera). Ms. Taymor has also garnered two Academy Awards and six Oscar nominations for Frida, a feature she directed with Salma Hayek in the title role. She’ll discuss her remarkable career with the Shakespeare Guild’s John Andrews and Pace University’s Cosmin Chivu in a “Masters Series” setting that will be familiar to TV audiences who enjoy Inside the Actors Studio.                  

___________________

 

For more information about The Shakespeare Guild, and for details about upcoming attractions (among them a February 25 program about Words from the White House with lexicographer Paul Dickson at the National Arts Club, and a May 23 gathering at The Players with painter Everett Raymond Kinstler, whose portrayals of stars like Tony Bennett, Katharine Hepburn, and Tom Wolfe have led admirers to compare him with the legendary John Singer Sargent), visit www.shakesguild.org 

 

CFP: Diversity and Homogeneity

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 24.0024  Sunday, 27 January 2013

 

From:        Agnieszka Rasmus <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         January 20, 2013 3:27:47 AM EST

Subject:     Call for Papers

 

Call for Papers

Diversity and Homogeneity:

The Politics of Nation, Class, and Gender in Drama, Theatre, Film and Media

Including a Shakespeare Day

25-27 October 2013

 

The Department of Drama and Pre-1800 Literature and the International Shakespeare Centre at the University of Łódź invite you to attend the 7th Biannual “Drama Through the Ages and Medieval Literature Conference”. 

 

The organizers wish to address the dynamics of the binary opposite of diversity and homogeneity. The democratic culture of the West, often seeing itself as the carrier of global standards, is ideologically paradoxical in itself. On the one hand, its fundamental premise is the freedom of each individual, which should seemingly embrace diversity and nourish difference as society’s organizing principle. On the other, however, its practice is to normalise people’s behaviour and effectively marginalise individuals that do not conform to the legal norms set by the majority, in effect creating a homogeneously sanitised and orderly society.

 

The aim of the conference is to look at how issues connected with the politics of nation, class, and gender are rendered in drama, theatre, film and media. Particular attention will be paid to the problem of multiculturalism, nationalism, social hierarchies, minorities, and identity.

 

As one conference day will be devoted exclusively to the analysis of the above thematic areas in the context of Shakespearean studies, we wish to extend the invitation to Shakespearean scholars wanting to address the issues of the politics of nation, class and gender in Shakespeare’s dramatic output as well as in contemporary reworkings of his plays in theatre, film and media.

 

Topics might include (but are not limited to): 

    * the politics of cultural/national/gender/religious/ethnic identity

    * the politics of recognition

    * the global – the national – the local

    * sexual politics 

    * gender politics

    * the politics of nation, class and gender in Shakespeare

 

We are pleased to announce the following keynote speakers:

Professor Judith Buchanan, University of York

Professor Christy Desmet, University of Georgia

Doctor Imke Lichterfeld, University of Bonn

Professor Ewa Mazierska, University of Central Lancashire

Professor Barbara Ozieblo, University of Málaga

Professor Kay Stanton,  California State University, Fullerton.

 

All abstracts (maximum of 350 words) must contain the title of the proposed paper, the name of the author and contact information (institutional affiliation, mailing address and email address). Abstracts should be submitted before no later than June 1st 2013. Selected papers will be published in a post-conference volume. 

 

Conference fee: 400 PLN for academics holding positions at Polish Universities, 120 Euro for delegates based outside of Poland, and reduced fee of 150 PLN for doctoral students. The fee covers conference materials, lunches, coffee and snacks, and conference reception. 

 

Honorary Organisers:

Prof. Krystyna Kujawińska-Courtney

Prof. Jadwiga Uchman

Prof. Andrzej Wicher

Organising Committee: 

dr Magdalena Cieślak

dr Agnieszka Rasmus

dr Monika Sosnowska

 

Please, send your abstracts or submit queries to:

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

For updated information about the conference see:

lodzoct2013.wordpress.com

 

Interruption

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 24.0023  Sunday, 27 January 2013

 

From:        Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         Sunday, January 27, 2013

Subject:     Interruption

 

Sorry for the unexpected interrupted in digests: flu I caught during visit to hospital and problems changing from commercial to residential Internet and phone service. Most things are back in order now.

 

Hardy Cook 

Editor of SHAKSPER: <shaksper.net>   

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.  

 

Pale Fire

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 24.0022  Friday, 18 January 2013

 

[1] From:        Harry Berger Jr <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

     Date:         January 17, 2013 1:24:35 PM EST

     Subject:     Re: SHAKSPER: Pale Fire 

 

[2] From:        Harry Rusche <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

     Date:         January 17, 2013 6:37:16 PM EST

     Subject:    Re: SHAKSPER: Pale Fire 

 

[3] From:        Duncan Salkeld <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

     Date:         January 17, 2013 7:02:49 PM EST

     Subject:     RE: Pale Fire 

 

[4] From:        Gabriel Egan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

     Date:         January 17, 2013 7:21:51 PM EST

     Subject:     Re: SHAKSPER: Pale Fire 

 

[5] From:        Arthur Lindley <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

     Date:         January 18, 2013 6:53:54 AM EST

     Subject:     Re: SHAKSPER: Pale Fire

 

[6] From:        Ros Barber <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

     Date:         January 18, 2013 9:22:30 AM EST

     Subject:     Re: Pale Fire

 

 

[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------

From:        Harry Berger Jr <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         January 17, 2013 1:24:35 PM EST

Subject:     Re: SHAKSPER: Pale Fire

 

I’m not interested in this occasionally nasty back-and-forth. I just want to say that I thought Charles Weinstein’s review was outstanding. It taught me a lot about the play.

 

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------

From:        Harry Rusche <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         January 17, 2013 6:37:16 PM EST

Subject:    Re: SHAKSPER: Pale Fire

 

Regarding the passage quoted by David Bishop:

 

“In contrast with previous studies, often characterized by a positivistic-deterministic hermeneutics and, consequently, by a largely passive analysis of source material or literary topoi, the new critical perspective pursued in this volume will take into account a wider European intertextual dimension and, above all, an ideological interpretation of the ‘aesthetics’ or ‘politics’ of intertextuality which will allow the analysis of the presence of the Italian world in early modern England not as a traditional treasure trove of influence and imitation but as a potential cultural force, generating complex processes of appropriation, transformation, and ideological opposition throughout a continuous dialectical interchange of compliance and subversion.”

 

Is there an English translation available for us illiterate teachers of Shakespeare?

 

Harry Rusche

Emory University

 

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------

From:        Duncan Salkeld <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         January 17, 2013 7:02:49 PM EST

Subject:     RE: Pale Fire

 

I had the pleasure of seeing this gripping production. Charles Weinstein uselessly laments its topicality, set against a backdrop of creditors, lenders and protesters. Its director, Nicholas Hytner thoughtfully and deliberately elected to go with a play for our times. Any other option, he knew (as he signals in an interview), would have been blinkered. The real problem with CW’s account (as others have noted) is that he allows personal dislike to contaminate his judgment of the production. Timon, as Simon Russell Beale plays him, is all charm, suavity and excessive generosity at first, but we also see hints of social awkwardness with apparent ‘friends’, and those hints spawn into monsters in the second half of the play. 

 

Weinstein feels cheated that ‘Phrynia and Timandra are no longer prostitutes, but card-carrying members of the rebellious underclass’. He didn’t find anything erotic at all in their very sexy club-dancing. I’m sorry to hear that, and suggest he ask for his money back. Those dancers morphed into clever, sassy women, but perhaps that was the problem. CW demurs. Plays ‘pander[ing] to a modern audience . . . are flatly offensive’. Offensive? Really? Good gracious, Shakespeare would never have done such a thing.

 

Weinstein grumbles at Timon’s ‘charmlessness’, attributing it to Beale rather than his role. Back to his favourite target, CW grumbles at Shakespeare’s ‘second-rate’ play too. Reading CW, one cannot avoid the thought that he himself (and I quote him verbatim) ‘is finally in his element, able to avoid all human contact that does not reek of defensive scorn.’ I will not quote him on ‘repetitive rants’, ‘rhetorical mediocrity and emotional constipation’, for that would be a characterization far too unfair.

 

Duncan Salkeld 

Reader in Shakespeare Studies

Department of English and Creative Writing

University of Chichester

 

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------

From:        Gabriel Egan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         January 17, 2013 7:21:51 PM EST

Subject:     Re: SHAKSPER: Pale Fire

 

David Bishop objects to the following description of a collection

of essays:

 

<< In contrast with previous studies, often characterized by a positivistic-deterministic hermeneutics and, consequently, by a largely passive analysis of source material or literary topoi, the new critical perspective pursued in this volume will take into account a wider European intertextual dimension and, above all, an ideological interpretation of the ‘aesthetics’ or ‘politics’ of intertextuality which will allow the analysis of the presence of the Italian world in early modern England not as a traditional treasure trove of influence and imitation but as a potential cultural force, generating complex processes of appropriation, transformation, and ideological opposition throughout a continuous dialectical interchange of compliance and subversion. >>

 

Granted, at 104 words it’s a bit long to be one sentence. But it’s pretty clear in its meaning, surely. I understand it to say that previous studies have been dull collections of facts and phenomena, while this one is informed by high French theory of the late 1960s, specifically Kristevan notions about intertextuality that go beyond simple source spotting and engage the concept of a dialectic interaction rather than merely observing that ‘A is found in B’.  The only bit of jargon it uses that perhaps falls outside what any English Literature graduate should be expected to know is “positivistic-deterministic hermeneutics”, and it’s not unreasonable to use a dash of undergraduate-level epistemology in this context.

 

Given that the writer appears to be a non-native speaker (if I’ve got the source right), as an editor I’d commend the quoted paragraph and simply suggest starting a new sentence after “dimension”. It seems to me mean-spirited for Bishop to criticize the above as if it were one of those impenetrable bits of theoretical writing one does occasional encounter. To compare unfavourably the above to the writing of Charles Weinstein, who maintains the curious conviction that “Timon of Athens is not about recession, class struggle or even income inequality” is most unfair.

 

The writer of the above does not, as far as I can see, misuse simple terms in the way Weinstein does. For example, “sybaritic” invokes the idea of effeminate luxury and so is misused in Weinstein’s “their sybaritic lifestyles: selling junk bonds, snorting coke, hitting on nubile women”. “Co-optation” is when a body of existing members of a group elects someone to join them, but Weinstein seems to think it means selling out to the man or otherwise going legit and hence Alcibiades starts out as a rebel but “In a final scene meant to suggest co-optation, we see him spruced up and wearing a suit, sitting at a dais while smoothly addressing the nation through a microphone”. Weinstein’s image of a “free-floating veneer” is particularly clumsy, since that’s the last thing a veneer is meant to do. I see no such errors of expression in the sentence Bishop objects to.

 

Gabriel Egan

 

[5]-------------------------------------------------------------

From:        Arthur Lindley <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         January 18, 2013 6:53:54 AM EST

Subject:     Re: SHAKSPER: Pale Fire

 

I assume Larry Weiss, David Bishop and Bruce Young are aware that the production of Timon that Charles is reviewing with his usual hauteur has been running since last July and has been extensively reviewed in the British press, not to mention the NYT and the New Yorker. Numerous descriptions are thus available online. To Charles’s customary distress, virtually all reviewers have praised Beale’s performance.

 

Arthur

 

[6]-------------------------------------------------------------

From:        Ros Barber <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         January 18, 2013 9:22:30 AM EST

Subject:     Re: Pale Fire

 

Bruce Young says ‘Not having seen this production of Timon, I’d be interested to read a detailed response to the actual content of Weinstein’s review’.

 

I saw this production and see no necessity for a detailed response. Charles Weinstein’s review was brilliantly written and spot-on. 

 

I also concur with David Bishop.

 

Ros Barber

 

Size of Touring Troupe in Gdansk, 1654

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 24.0021  Friday, 18 January 2013

 

From:        Steve Urkowitz <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         January 17, 2013 8:24:51 PM EST

Subject:     Size of Touring Troupe in Gdansk, 1654

 

Not always up on my Continental touring data, I was surprised to read, in a handsomely produced pamphlet from the Gdanski Teatr Szekspirowski , a troupe’s 1654 petition for permission to play in the purpose-built playhouse designed to accommodate touring English actors, a building known as the Gdansk Fencing School. 

 

In translation it reads:

 

“Herr Bergomaster // High, Honourable, Stern, Noble, Praiseworthy, Most Wise and Especially Respected Lords, // Since the time approaches when the St Dominic’s Fair will be held again, of which time all manner of amusements are permitted, we have come here in a rather large company of 24 persons in the hope that it may be permitted us to present sundry religious and secular plays to be watched and listened to, both comedies and tragedies, most of which are new and ingenious and yet noble at the same time. This is what we have humbly and appropriately seen fit to beg Your Magnificences, namely to show us grace not only by granting us permission to play, but by assigning the Fencing School to us, as being a very suitable place. We for our part will gladly make an appropriate payment. Besides this, we will behave in such a way that everyone will take pleasure in watching us.  In expectation of your gracious and favorable response, we remain // Your True Humble // I, William Roe in the name of // the whole company.”

 

Though many theories have been offered concerning the size of troupes of traveling players, my admittedly partial memory of those arguments does not recall any hard evidence for just how many players, boys, assistants, wranglers, teamsters or porters may have been on the road together. The “rather large company of 24 persons” seems not have been customary at any time. And it may well have been especially large in 1654, after the closing of the theaters in London. Nevertheless 24 is at least a pretty definite and pretty big number. One ought not generalize from a sample of one, but this one documented touring troupe had lots of players available. And it seems to go against this one hard nugget of evidence just to assume that a script like Romeo and Juliet Q1 (1597) Or Henry V Q1 (1600) must have been cut down for a touring troupe. Or that touring companies before the closings would have been accustomed to playing scripts reduced to be managed by small groups of only ten or a dozen. 

 

Time for me to get back to reading more of Susan Cerasano, Roslyn Knutson, and others who have written about acting companies on the roads.

 

Steven On-the-road-owitz

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