Research Pamphlet 1605

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 24.0007  Monday, 7 January 2013

 

From:        Capucine François <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         January 7, 2013 4:03:48 AM EST

Subject:     Research Pamphlet 1605 

 

Hello,

 

I am a French student of English literature studies and I am looking for a pamphlet entitled ‘Two Most Vnnatural and Bloodie Murthers’ written around 1605 and published in the Stationers’ Register.

 

Could you help me find it?

 

Many thanks in advance,

Capucine Francois

 

[Editor’s Note: Please reply directly to Capucine Francois This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. if your are able to help. -Hardy]

Invitation to Join the Asian Shakespeare Association

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 24.0006  Monday, 7 January 2013

 

From:        Asian Shakespeare Association <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         January 4, 2013 8:31:09 PM EST

Subject:     Invitation to Join the Asian Shakespeare Association

 

Call for Participation

 

Help us found the Asian Shakespeare Association [http://asianshakespeare.org].

 

Asia has affected the studies and performances of Shakespeare in Asia and around the world. This calls for a collective effort—increasing exchanges and collaborations among Asian Shakespeareans and between Asia and the rest of the world. But given the vastness and diversity of Asia, the richness of its scholarship and theatres, we can, should, and must do more. The time has come to establish a formal association: a non-profit, non-government organization dedicated to researching, producing, teaching, translating, and promoting Shakespeare from an Asian perspective.

 

A draft constitution has been created. The next step is to recruit more participants and to elect an executive committee through an online vote. More detail about membership, governance, conferences and other matters will be discussed in the executive committee when it is formed.

 

If you support the idea, please sign up. Online registration opens on 1 January 2013.

 

If you register before 31 January 2013, you can log in to nominate candidates for the executive committee. The nomination will close after 31 January 2013. Online election for committee members will open on 1 February and close on 28 February 2013.

 

If you have any questions or suggestions, please let us know.

 

We look forward to your participation. Please also help to spread the word in your community.

 

Asian Shakespeare Association Foundational Members

Abad, Ricardo (Philippines)

Al-Dabbagh, Abdulla (United Arab Emirates)

Atienza, Michaela (Philippines)

Billings, Timothy James (United States)

Burt, Richard (United States)

Chakravarti, Paromita (India)

Chaudhuri, Sukanta (India)

Chaudhury, Sarbani (India)

Cheng, Chaoxiang (China)

Chopra, Vikram (India)

Gleckman, Jason (Hong Kong)

Han, Younglim (Korea)

Ho, Elaine (Hong Kong)

Huang, Alexander C. Y. (United States)

Ick, Judy Celine (Philippines)

Jimenez, Florianne (Philippines)

Kim, Kang (Korea)

Lamb, Julian (Hong Kong)

Lee, Hyon-u (Korea)

Lei, Bi-qi Beatrice (Taiwan)

Li, Ruru (United Kingdom)

Lim, Swee Huat Walter (Singapore)

Low binti Abdullah, Nurul Farhana (Malaysia)

Lu, Po-Shen (Taiwan)

Luo, Yimin (China)

Minami, Ryuta (Japan)

Motohashi, Ted (Japan)

Mukherjee, Shreyosi (Singapore)

Perng, Ching-Hsi (Taiwan)

Suematsu, Michiko (Japan)

Tierney, Robert (United States)

Trivedi, Poonam (India)

Tsoi, Sik Cheong Hardy (Hong Kong)

Ueda, Kuniyoshi Munakata (Japan)

Wong, Katrine (Macau)

Wu, Hsing-kuo (Taiwan)

Yang, Gary Lingui (China)

Yoshihara, Yukari (Japan)

Zhang, Chong (China)

Children and Shakespeare

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 24.0005  Friday, 4 January 2013

 

[1] From:        Sue Marrone <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

     Date:         January 2, 2013 11:35:13 AM EST

     Subject:     Re: SHAKSPER: Children and Shakespeare 

 

[2] From:        Reg Grouse <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

     Date:         January 3, 2013 5:35:23 AM EST

     Subject:     Children and Shakespeare 

 

 

[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------

From:        Sue Marrone <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         January 2, 2013 11:35:13 AM EST

Subject:     Re: SHAKSPER: Children and Shakespeare

 

As many of you have had the experience of introducing Shakespeare to young students, I would like to share with you two quick anecdotes. I had the pleasure of producing an education Shakespeare touring group, where we performed a truncated version of DREAM. The 4th grade classes were given a written questionnaire afterwards. 

 

Here are two of questions: “What would you have changed in the play?”  Several answered: “They should have asked their mother.”

 

“What did you like about the play?”  Now many liked the “fight” and other visuals, but to my happy surprise, many wrote down they liked having multiple story lines.

 

If properly presented, Shakespeare is for the masses, including children.

 

Sue Marrone

 

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------

From:        Reg Grouse <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         January 3, 2013 5:35:23 AM EST

Subject:     Children and Shakespeare

 

Paul Barry’s claim that ‘Kids love music, and poetry is music’ is undeniably incorrect. I presumed that Paul Barry was referring to the fact that certain qualities in poetry are similar to qualities in music. He might have mentioned that there are similar qualities in all Fine Art.* I presume it was the aesthetic qualities that he meant and perhaps it is so that children react more readily to aesthetic or emotional impulses than to the intellectual. As we gain experience in language we tend to overlook our emotional responses because we have no language to describe them. Seldom does an art historian try to describe why he likes a painting or a sculpture. He describes the history of the work, something about the artist, what has come before and after, something about the subject; all of which could apply to a work of no value aesthetically. The same applies to poetry and music criticism.

 

When critics do mention emotional reactions it is usually in metaphoric terms. 

 

Even Shakespeare, with his unique command of language, resorts to metaphor to describe his fascination for the young man: ‘Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day?’, Jaques talking about the lover ‘with a woeful ballad/ Made to his mistress’ eyebrow;’ and King Henry V to the French Katharine: ‘I know no ways to mince it in love, but directly to say, “I love you” then if you urge me farther to say, “Do you in faith?” I wear out my suit. Give me your answer; i’ faith, do: and so clap hands on a bargain. How say you, lady?’ This inability to express our emotions in words leads us to think that our emotions are unimportant, but instinct tells us that our emotions are the very life force of existence. It is not surprising then that young children feel things emotionally before they reason intellectually. That is, before they have been conditioned by learning to understand intellectual concepts. 

 

Cheers,

Reg Grouse

 

* The New Oxford Dictionary of English defines Fine Arts: creative art, especially visual art whose products are to be appreciated primarily or solely for their imaginative, aesthetic or intellectual content.

Rare Edition of 4-text Hamlet Available from Folger

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 24.0004  Friday, 4 January 2013

 

From:        Georgianna Ziegler <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         January 3, 2013 9:34:53 AM EST

Subject:     Rare Edition of 4-text Hamlet Available from Folger 

 

The Folger Library has just digitized the rare, proof copy of Teena Rochfort Smith’s Four-Text Edition of Shakspere’s Hamlet. This was prepared in 1883 and never published, likely due to Teena’s tragic death soon afterwards, but the Folger acquired a copy of the proofs. 

 

The story is told by Ann Thompson in “Teena Rochfort Smith, Frederick Furnivall, and the New Shakspere Society’s Four-Text Edition of Hamlet,” SQ 49 (1998): 125-39.

 

Here is the reference with links to the record in our online catalog and to the fully digitized item:

 

Shakespeare, William, 1564-1616[Hamlet]  A four-text edition of Shakspere’s Hamlet : 1. quarto 1, 1603 -- 2. quarto 2, 1604 -- 3. folio 1, 1623 -- 4. a revized text : in parallel columns / edited by Teena Rochfort Smith. 1883. PR2807 1883b Sh.Col.,  21 images. (HamnetLUNA)

 

Georgianna Ziegler

Louis B. Thalheimer Head of Reference

Folger Shakespeare Library

Children and Shakespeare

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 24.0003  Tuesday, 1 January 2013

 

From:        Markus Marti <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         December 29, 2012 4:27:50 PM EST

Subject:     Re: SHAKSPER: Children and Shakespeare

 

Dear Terry,

 

What should poetry be, if not a kind of music? It is certainly not “sense”!

 

Markus Marti 

 

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