Go to

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 27.290  Tuesday, 30 August 2016

 

[1] From:        Liza Blake <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

     Date:         August 29, 2016 at 10:26:54 AM EDT

     Subj:         Re: SHAKSPER: Conference: Go to

 

[2] From:        Liza Blake <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

     Date:         August 29, 2016 at 10:26:54 AM EDT

     Subj:         Re: SHAKSPER: Conference: Go to

 

[3] From:        Liza Blake <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

     Date:         August 29, 2016 at 10:26:54 AM EDT

    Subj:         Re: SHAKSPER: Conference: Go to

 

[4] From:        Liza Blake <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

     Date:         August 29, 2016 at 10:26:54 AM EDT

     Subj:         Re: SHAKSPER: Conference: Go to

 

 

[1]----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

From:        Liza Blake <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         August 29, 2016 at 10:26:54 AM EDT

Subject:    Re: SHAKSPER: Conference: Go to

 

For John Cox: “to go to” is in the OED, s.v. “go, v.”:

 

1. intr.

a. To go about one's work; to set to work, begin working. Chiefly imper., as an exhortation to do this. 

 b. imper. Expressing (playful) impatience or dismissiveness, or (mock) disbelief, derision, etc.: ‘get away’. Now arch. and rare.

Phrases are typically listed at the end of entries of individual words. 


[2]----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

From:        Peter Holland <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         August 29, 2016 at 10:50:47 AM EDT

Subject:    Re: SHAKSPER: Conference: Go to

 

John Cox asks why ‘go to’ is not in the OED. But it is. Late in the colossal entry on go, v. there is a long series of forms of go with a following preposition (go round, go through, etc etc) and, among them, you will find ‘to go to’, which includes, as sense 1.b (I give only the start of its list of quotations):

 

 b. imper. Expressing (playful) impatience or dismissiveness, or (mock) disbelief, derision, etc.: ‘get away’. Now arch. and rare.

?1531   tr. Erasmus Treat. Perswadynge Man Patientlye to Suffre sig. C.iij,   Nowe go to, tell me [L. sed age], what losse is it, that ye susteine by my deth?

1590   R. Harvey Plaine Percevall Ded. sig. A3,   Go to Martin, go to: I know a man is a man, though he haue but a hose on his head.

1602   J. Marston Hist. Antonio & Mellida iii. sig. E,   Goe to, goe to; thou liest Philosophy.

1740   S. Richardson Pamela I. xxxi. 190   Go to, go to, naughty mistrustful Mrs. Pamela.

 

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From:        John W Kennedy <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         August 29, 2016 at 12:21:14 PM EDT

Subject:    Re: SHAKSPER: Conference: Go to

 

From:        John Cox <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

 

“Go to” as a separate phrase (always imperative) is common in early modern English, and it can mean a lot of things. Defining it in a particular context is not always easy. 

 

It is not included in the Oxford English Dictionary.

 

Does anyone know why?

 

It is in the 3rd Edition.

 

John W Kennedy

 

[4]----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

From:        John Cox <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         August 29, 2016 at 2:02:54 PM EDT

Subject:    Go to

 

Thanks to Peter Holland for the OED reference for “to go to.” This is where the OED lists instances of “Go to” as a separate phrase.

 

Still, I think the editors did readers a disservice by not listing “Go to” as a distinct phrase, given its common appearance in early modern English. (Offlist, someone sent me an instance in Conrad as well.) It does not appear in the dropdown list of instances under the update notice (June, 2015), and I doubt if most readers would recognize “to go to” as the appropriate heading, even if it’s technically correct.

 

“Go” is an extraordinarily long and complex entry in the OED, and perhaps the editors should be forgiven for a possible oversight, but it does seem to me to be oversight, nonetheless. 

 

 

 

Podcast on Shakespeare and New Historicism

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 27.289  Tuesday, 30 August 2016

 

From:        Neema Parvini <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         August 29, 2016 at 5:45:44 PM EDT

Subject:    Podcast on Shakespeare and New Historicism

 

http://blogs.surrey.ac.uk/shakespeare/2016/08/29/shakespeare-and-contemporary-theory-27-shakespeare-and-new-historicist-theory-with-evelyn-gajowski-and-neema-parvini/

 

Neema welcomes back Evelyn Gajowski, editor for the Arden Shakespeare and Theory series. In a change from the norm, in this episode, Evelyn turns the tables and interviews Neema about his forthcoming book Shakespeare and New Historicist Theory. Topics include the place of theory in Shakespeare studies; differences between new historicism and cultural materialism; presentism; the re-emergence of positivism; and Shakespeare's empathy.

 

 

Go to

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 27.288  Monday, 29 August 2016

 

From:        John Cox <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         August 29, 2016 at 9:24:13 AM EDT

Subject:    Go to

 

“Go to” as a separate phrase (always imperative) is common in early modern English, and it can mean a lot of things. Defining it in a particular context is not always easy. 

 

It is not included in the Oxford English Dictionary.

 

Does anyone know why?

 

 

Conference: Early Modern Debts: 21-22 September 2017

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 27.287  Monday, 29 August 2016

 

From:        Christa Jansohn <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         August 29, 2016 at 2:26:45 AM EDT

Subject:    Conference: Early Modern Debts: 21-22 September 2017


A symposium entitled ‘Early Modern Debts’ will take place at the Otto-Friedrich-Universitaet Bamberg, 21-22 September 2017, organized by Dr George Oppitz-Trotman (Humboldt Fellow, Lehrstuhl für Britische Kultur).

Several internationally renowned scholars, including Prof. Lena Orlin (Georgetown) and Prof. Lorna Hutson (St Andrews) have stated an intention to come; the theme has already excited significant interest for its timeliness and focus. It promises to be an exciting and important event. More details can be found at the conference website: early-modern-debts.space
 

Prof. Dr. Christa Jansohn
Lehrstuhl für Britische Kultur 
Kapuzinerstr. 16 
D-96047 Bamberg 
Phone: 0049-(0)951-863 2270 
E-Mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. 
Internet: 
http://www.uni-bamberg.de/britcult

 

Co-Editor: Archiv fuer das Studium der Neueren Sprachen und Literaturen:
http://www.esv.info/z/archiv/zeitschriften.html

 

Co-Editor: Editionen in der Kritik:
http://www.weidler-verlag.de/Reihen/Berliner_Beitr__zur_Editionswi/berliner_beitr__zur_editionswi.html

 

Co-Editor: Jahrbuch Literatur und Medizin:

http://www.uni-bamberg.de/en/britcult/contact/staff/prof-dr-christa-jansohn/information-on-the-editorial-boards/

 

 

 

 

MV Dialog

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 27.286   Sunday, 28 August 2016

 

From:        William Blanton <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         August 26, 2016 at 4:55:59 PM EDT

Subject:    Re: SHAKSPER: MV Dialog

 

I am changing my approach to this dialog. I will be more formal and pay more attention to grammar, diction, and the like.

 

I will also utilize a suggestion that John made. I will focus on empirical evidence, by which I mean Shakespeare’s words in the text. If anyone knows of any other substantive evidence contemporary with Shakespeare that relates to MV, please let me know.

 

I will use John’s Arden edition, which has scene divisions and line numbers that the First Folio does not have. I will use the First Folio as a reference to insure that we consider Shakespeare’s words as he wrote them.

 

I will also use Larry’s observation that “EVIDENCE is the basis upon which interpretations are made” and “evidence is the basis upon which we find facts; the facts are the building blocks of theories.” I will also use Hardy’s observation that there does exist factual evidence contemporary with Shakespeare other than the text of the play

 

Using John’s, Hardy’s, and Larry’s observations, I will approach our discussion on a kind of scientific basis. I will propose an hypothesis. I will then set out the empirical evidence that supports that hypothesis. 

 

I will also set out any circumstantial evidence that I believe supports that hypothesis. By circumstantial evidence I mean contemporary facts other than the words in the text that elucidate the meaning of the words. The common law regarding the construction of contracts requires the court to consider the surrounding circumstances in order to understand what the parties intended by their contract. These circumstances cannot be used to alter the meaning of the contract.

 

I will then identify any of my opinions, conclusions, and interpretations as speculations so that readers will clearly know that I am not claiming those speculations as facts. Readers will then be able to cite any contrary empirical evidence or circumstantial evidence that they may be aware of; criticize any of my speculations; and offer speculations of their own.

 

BASSANIO AS ESSEX

 

HYPOTHESIS: Bassanio represents the Earl of Essex on the Political/Religious/Current Events Dimension of Meaning

 

STORY DIMENSION:

 

1.   Liveries and trumpets.

 

We should consider carefully any words or phrases that Shakespeare repeated several times in short succession. He emphasized those words so that his audiences would be alerted to something significant. Competent poets and playwrights do not use unnecessary words.

 

One of those words is liveries, which appears three times within 46 lines and nowhere else in the play, and has nothing to do with any of the action. You could omit the word and have no effect on the play.

 

EMPIRICAL EVIDENCE:

 

CLOWN …Father, I am glad you are come. Give me your present

to one Master Bassanio, who indeed gives rare new

liveries:… .(2.2.101-02)

 

BASSANIO [to a Follower] …See these letters delivered, put

the liveries to making… .(2.2.108-09)

 

BASSANIO [to Clown] Take leave of thy old master and enquire

My lodging out. [to a Follower] Give him a livery

More guarded than his fellows’… .(2.2.145-46)

 

 

LORENZO Your husband is at hand, I hear his trumpet. (5.1.122)

 

 

CIRCUMSTANTIAL EVIDENCE:

 

In June 1591, Elizabeth gave Essex his first command: to assist Henri IV in France, supporting the Protestants against the Catholic Guise faction. Essex asked his friends, and compelled his tenants, to join him and to provide horses and footmen. Essex spent £14,000 “equipping his forces and dressing them in his tangerine and white liveries.” 

 

At one point, Henri asked Essex to join him for a meeting. Essex had one hundred of his horsemen — all dressed in his colorful livery — travel one hundred miles over hostile territory in order to accompany him to the meeting. Essex entered the town preceeded by “ ‘six pages mounted on chargers and dressed in orange velvet all embroidered with gold. And he himself had a military cloak of orange velvet covered all with jewels. His saddle, bridle and the rest of his horse’s harness alone were worth 60,000 crowns. He had twelve tall body–squires and six trumpets sounding before him.’”

(From Lacy, Robert, Earl of Essex, p. 84, quoting from J. S. Corbett, The Successors to Drake, p. 19).

 

 

SPECULATION:

 

Shakespeare was teasing Essex by reminding him — and, of course, the audience — of this spectacular display of narcissism, which would have been the subject of much gossip at the time.

 

 

SOURCE DIMENSION:

 

Shakespeare made a number of changes to his main source, Il Pecorone, in order allow Bassanio to represent the Earl of Essex on the Political/Religious/Current Events Dimension of meaning.

 

 

EMPIRICAL EVIDENCE:

 

2.    Name.

 

He changed Giannetto to Bassanio

 

 

CIRCUMSTANTIAL EVIDENCE:

 

Shakespeare had been involved with Emilia Bassano Lanier. Her father was from Venice, and was a musician in Elizabeth’s court. She was also the mistress of Henry Carey, 1st Baron Hunsdon, who was Lord Chamberlain and patron of Shakespeare’s acting company. She also may have been the Dark Lady of the Sonnets.

 

SPECULATIONS:

 

Several scholars have speculated that Emilia Bassano Lanier inspired this choice of name. Venice; music; Lord Chamberlain; Dark Lady: each of these connect Emilia with Shakespeare or with MV. All Shakespeare had to do was add an i to Bassano. In addition, Shakespeare included various friends as characters under different names (Gratiano as Southampton, for instance. [To be discussed later.])

 

 

3.    Relationship. 

 

EMPIRICAL EVIDENCE: 

 

Shakespeare changed the relationship between Giannetto and Ansaldo from godson and godfather to that of a young profligate (Bassanio) who borrowed a great deal of money from an unrelated older man (Antonio) with whom he may have been sexually involved.

 

CIRCUMSTANTIAL EVIDENCE:

 

The original godfather-godson relationship still had resonance with Essex. Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester, became his stepfather when Leicester married his mother, Lettice Knollys Devereux. Like Ansaldo did for Giannetto, Leicester took the young Essex under his wing, introduced him to Elizabeth’s court, and took him to fight the Spanish in the Netherlands.

 

 

4.    The loan. 

 

Ansaldo borrowed ten thousand ducats from a Jew at Mestri in order to furnish Giannetto with a third ship complete with rich cargo. Ansaldo did not know of Giannetto’s attraction to the Lady of Belmonte. Giannetto did not know the terms of Ansaldo’s bond with the Jew until after it had been signed and sealed, and never protested that Ansaldo should not bind himself to the Jew.

 

EMPIRICAL EVIDENCE:

 

Antonio borrowed three thousand ducats from Shylocke, a Jew of Venice. Antonio knew that Bassanio would use this money in order to supply himself with the fine clothes and rich gifts he thought he needed in order to make a good impression on Portia, the Lady of Belmont. Bassanio had arranged for the loan, was present at the negotiation, and protested that Antonio should not make such a risky bargain.

 

CIRCUMSTANTIAL EVIDENCE:

 

In 1590 Essex borrowed three thousand pounds from Elizabeth, and she insisted on its repayment. Essex satisfied this debt by giving to Elizabeth one of his few remaining unmortgaged properties, complete with a nice manor house. Shortly thereafter Elizabeth gave Essex a valuable farm on sweet wines for a term of ten years. (Lacy, p.75)

 

 

SPECULATION: 

 

Shakespeare was teasing Essex by reminding him of his dependency on Elizabeth and of her sometimes cruelty towards him. By late 1596, Essex and Southampton would have become very worried that Elizabeth would not renew the farm on sweet wines. Essex had borrowed a great deal of money based on that source of income. Once it was gone, Essex would be bankrupt. It is this dire circumstance that motivated Essex and Southampton to contemplate regime change.

 

To be continued.

 

Bill

 

 

 

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