Subscribe to Our Feeds

Current Postings RSS

Announcements RSS

Home ::


Shakespeare and Science

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 25.362  Thursday, 21 August 2014

 

From:        Lawrence Weiss < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         August 20, 2014 at 1:22:25 PM EDT

Subject:    Re: Shakespeare and Science

 

>Sorry, but it’s Lawrence Weiss who is having a breakdown 

>of historic proportions. Saxo’s Amleth was a 12th century 

>invention. Shakespeare’s guy is 16th century, and goes to 

>school in Wittenberg (founded 1502) ... where the Copernican 

>model was taught from ca. 1543. Anachronisms were a common

>device employed by Shakespeare and other authors, a tactic for 

>introducing current hot topics into ancient settings:

 

Good grief! The Hamlet in Shakespeare’s play is the same character in essentially the same story previously told by Saxo-Belleforest-Kyd(?). i.e., an 11th C. Danish (Viking) prince. Hence, the references in the play to “our neglected tribute” (Danegeld) and the election of Danish kings, which was no longer the case in Ren. Denmark. The king of England referred to in the play was Edward the Confessor. Sure there are anachronisms—this is Shakespeare, after all—including Wittenberg. But so what? To say that the anachronisms were some sort of a political device goes far beyond the evidence. The play is not intended as history; even Shakespeare’s histories aren’t especially historical. Hugh Grady said it all in his post and I don’t have to add anything.

 

>Enough of this.

 

Amen!

 
 
Gentle Correction: Gielgud Theatre for Curious Incident

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 25.361  Thursday, 21 August 2014

 

From:        J Schmitz < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         August 20, 2014 at 11:13:30 AM EDT

Subject:    Gentle Correction: Gielgud Theatre for Curious Incident

 

This is a gentle observation that The Curious Incident re-opened at the Gielgud

Theatre (not the Noël Coward, where you saw Shakespeare in Love).

 

All best,

Johanna Schmitz

Department of Theater and Dance

Southern Illinois University Edwardsville

 
[Editor's Note: Thank You. -Hardy]
 
PBS Shakespeare Uncovered

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 25.360  Thursday, 21 August 2014

 

From:        Kirk McElhearn < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         August 20, 2014 at 10:57:49 AM EDT

Subject:    Re: Uncovered

 

On Aug 20, 2014, at 3:55 PM, Hardy M. Cook < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it > wrote:

 

>PBS Shakespeare Uncovered can be streamed from links below:

>

>The Tempest with Trevor Nunn

>Hamlet with David Tennant

>Richard II with Derek Jacobi

>The Comedies with Joely Richardson

>Henry IV & V with Jeremy Irons

 

I’ve watched four of these so far - bought from the iTunes Store - and they’re excellent, except for the part where Derek Jacobi had to bring his anti-Stratfordian opinions into his episode.

 

Kirk

 
 
Lear Invitation

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 25.359  Thursday, 21 August 2014

 

From:        Conrad Bishop < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         August 19, 2014 at 7:22:49 PM EDT

Subject:    Lear Invitation

 

We’re in rehearsal for a production of KING LEAR, previewing in March and continuing in tour repertory. It’s two actors as Lear and the Fool, plus 28 puppets - Lear’s story evoked from him the way the stories come forth from the souls in Dante’s hell.

 

I’ll be posting weekly notes about this exploration on our blog:  DamnedFool.com. I invite you to subscribe - go to the site, sample it, and click the “Follow” button on the lower right.

 

The viewpoint is very subjective - one actor/director’s year-long obsession - but it comes out of seeing a number of LEARs, from our own puppet stagings of MACBETH and THE TEMPEST, and from a dead-serious grappling with the text.  Not conventional in any sense except in our attempt to find each moment in the language and to give each character a full humanity.

 

The blog also includes the voice of my partner of 53 years (45 as professionals) and of the great-great-grandson of Lear’s acidic Fool - we often feel the need for one.

 

We’d also appreciate receiving, privately, anything you’d like to share from experiences with LEAR.

 

Peace & joy-

 

Conrad Bishop

The Independent Eye, Ltd.

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 
 
Lesser-Known ‘Falstaff’

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 25.358  Thursday, 21 August 2014

 

From:        Hardy M. Cook < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         August 21, 2014 at 10:10:23 AM EDT

Subject:    The Lesser-Known ‘Falstaff,’ in 1980s Clothing

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/08/21/arts/music/the-lesser-known-falstaff-in-1980s-clothing.html

 

The New York Times

 

Shakespeare’s Preening Con Man, as Seen by Salieri, Then Updated

The Lesser-Known ‘Falstaff,’ in 1980s Clothing

By Vivien Schweitzer

 

Antonio Salieri and his some 40 operas are not usually cited amid the incessant drumbeat of composer anniversaries in New York. But his birthday (Aug. 18) received a rare nod on Tuesday when the dell’Arte Opera Ensemble presented his “Falstaff,” a gem performed as part of the company’s two-week A Summer of Shakespeare festival.

 

Composed in 1799 and one of the first operatic incarnations of Shakespeare’s “The Merry Wives of Windsor,” “Falstaff” loudly echoes Mozart, although the work lacks both the sublimity and profundity of Mozart’s operas. But while Salieri’s music may be more earthbound, this work reflects his stature as an important composer of late-18th-century opera, a skillfully composed work that charms with its attractive melodies, lovely vocal ensemble numbers and agile orchestration.

 

A slightly different plot unfolds in the libretto (by Carlo Prospero Defranceschi) than in Verdi’s better-known version of the Shakespeare play. The young lovers Fenton and Anne are omitted and a scene added in which Mrs. Ford impersonates a German girl (here an au pair wearing a huge pink hair bow) to tempt Falstaff. Salieri’s opera buffa also lacks the character depth of Verdi’s “Falstaff” and the dark-hued undertones of Mozart’s comedies.

 

The dell’Arte band played well throughout — led by the spirited and polished playing of Audrey Lo (the concertmaster). John Spencer conducted from the keyboard, deftly rendering the recitativo accompaniment.

 

Louisa Proske, who directed this effective production in the black-box space of the East 13th Street Theater, updated the action to the 1980s. As the title character, the potbellied, blue-suit clad Gary Ramsey proved suitably sleazy as he portrayed the lascivious con artist, projecting a preening confidence in his own magnetism. His charisma and robust baritone were marred only by his mushy Italian diction.

 

[ . . . ]

 
 
<< Start < Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Next > End >>

Page 3 of 7

©2011 Hardy Cook. All rights reserved.