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Adventures in Original Pronunciation

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 26.076  Friday, 20 February 2015

 

[1] From:        Mari Bonomi < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

     Date:         February 19, 2015 at 5:28:02 PM EST

     Subject:    Re: SHAKSPER: OP

 

[2] From:        Lawrence Weiss < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

     Date:         February 20, 2015 at 12:14:03 AM EST

     Subject:    Re: OP 

 

[3] From:        Gabriel Egan < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

     Date:         February 20, 2015 at 4:40:48 AM EST

     Subject:    OP 

 

 

[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------

From:        Mari Bonomi < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         February 19, 2015 at 5:28:02 PM EST

Subject:    Re: SHAKSPER: OP

 

Bill Blanton says, regarding MoV, “He did it to bring into the play by reference the Book of Job, in which God made a deal with the Devil.”

 

Umm. No.

 

In the Biblical Book of Job, God makes a wager with one of his angels, NOT with “the Devil.”

 

That rather weakens the rest of the offered analysis, which has otherwise quite a bit to recommend it... if you believe that Shakespeare believed Shylock actually to be a devil.

 

Mari Bonomi

 

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------

From:        Lawrence Weiss < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         February 20, 2015 at 12:14:03 AM EST

Subject:    Re: OP

 

>A more interesting example, if you want to stick with ‘fend’ is the 

>reference in King Lear to ‘the forfended place’ i.e. female genitals,

> that raises a host of questions.

 

Easy questions perhaps.  It’s obvious that Hell is a place “for fiends,” however pronounced.

 

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------

From:        Gabriel Egan < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         February 20, 2015 at 4:40:48 AM EST

Subject:    OP

 

William Blanton writes of The Merchant of Venice:

 

> Shakespeare (who ought to know) spelled Launcelet's

> last name as "Jobbe". . . . He spelled it this way

> in both the First Quarto and in the version included

> in the First Folio.

 

That spelling certainly appears in Q1 and F, but not exclusively. Here are the counts from the Internet Shakespeare Editions transcriptions of these editions:

 

Q1:

"Iobbe" 5 times

"Gobbo" 9 times

"Gobbe" 1 time

"Gob." 10 times

 

F:

"Iobbe" 6 times

"Gobbo" 1 time

"Gob." 19 times

 

One might argue that spellings in speech prefixes, stage directions, and dialogue need to be treated differently from one another on account of their being more or less likely to reflect Shakespeare’s spelling (because compositors were more or less likely to impose their own spellings on these parts of the text).

 

But Blanton care to make such a claim? Without it, the most we can say is “Yes, the characters’ last name is spelt a bit like Job 20% of the time (in Q1) or 23% of the time (in F), but mostly it isn’t”.

 

Gabriel Egan

 
 
Waxing Lyrical: Dripping Candles Cause Mayhem at Sam Wanamaker

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 26.075  Friday, 20 February 2015

 

From:        Hardy Cook < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         February 19, 2015 at 6:01:10 PM EST

Subject:    Waxing Lyrical: Dripping Candles Cause Mayhem at Sam Wanamaker 

 

[Editor's Note: From The Guardian. -Hardy]

 

http://www.theguardian.com/stage/2015/feb/06/dripping-wax-sam-wanamaker-playhouse

 

Waxing lyrical: dripping candles cause mayhem at Sam Wanamaker Playhouse

 

The “groundlings” who stand in the pit of the open-air Shakespeare’s Globe theatre have long been at the mercy of rain, aeroplane noise and – in theory, at least – the odd passing bird relieving itself in mid-air. Now some audience members at the London venue’s newer indoor playhouse are having to contend with an unusual hazard of their own: hot wax dripping on them from a great height.

 

The Sam Wanamaker Playhouse aims to re-create, as closely as possible, the 17th century theatregoing experience, complete with authentically uncomfortable wooden benches and a stage illuminated by candlelight. Located in London’s South Bank, the venue is currently playing host to an acclaimed production of Jacobean bloody drama The Changeling starring award-winning actor Hattie Morahan.

But it is not just stage blood that is flowing. Some attendees have described how, while watching the gory goings-on unfold on stage, they have suddenly felt warm liquid running down their leg or spattering their clothing, only to discover it is hot wax dripping from one of the chandeliers above their heads.

 

The Globe admitted it had become aware of a “disturbance” in the venue’s air system “that is causing candle wax to drip on to patrons in two seats in the pit”. With the problem yet to be resolved, the theatre has had to resort to contacting people who have booked the affected seats to tell them it is moving them to alternative seats. It is also offering to pay people’s dry cleaning bills.

 

B10 appears to be one of the seats where the risk of being doused in molten beeswax is especially acute. Writing on the Theatreforum website, one theatregoer who attended a preview performance of The Changeling said: “So here I was in B10 when suddenly I heard what sounded like the pitter-patter of rain and my leg felt warm... When I looked down I realised that some of the candle wax had dripped on to my trousers.” The man, calling himself Nicholas, said this happened intermittently during the first half, and that when he alerted the stewards during the interval, “they gave me advice on getting wax out of my trousers”, changed the candle, and moved everyone in the row back a seat.

 

[ . . . ]

 

Those told they were being moved to alternative seats included people who had booked to see the next play in the season, Farinelli and the King, starring Mark Rylance, who is currently winning plaudits for his performance in the BBC’s Wolf Hall adaptation.

Part of the rationale for building the indoor playhouse, which opened in January 2014, was that it allowed the Globe to put on performances year-round; given the British weather, the main open-air space can only operate from April to October. The 340-seat timber structure has been widely praised by architecture and theatre critics, and certainly eliminates the hazards associated with alfresco entertainment, but appears to have introduced a few of its own. In addition to dripping candles, there have been complaints from some theatregoers that the 17th century style backless benches have taken a toll on their rears and backs, while Globe artistic director, Dominic Dromgoole, has himself admitted that some of the sightlines are “shit”.

 

A Globe spokeswoman said that as a temporary precautionary measure, it was reseating patrons who had booked the affected seats until the dripping candle problem was resolved. She added: “We always offer to pay dry cleaning bills for patrons who have had candle wax drip on to their clothes, and our front of house staff have been thanked by several affected patrons for how quickly and diligently the matter was handled.”

 

It appears some ‘victims’ even see being dripped on as a badge of honour. “One gentleman told us he would be framing the shirt he was wearing when wax dripped on to his sleeve, as a souvenir of his evening,” said the spokeswoman.

 
 
Adventures in Original Pronunciation

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 26.074  Thursday, 19 February 2015

 

[1] From:        John Drakakis < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

     Date:         February 19, 2015 at 7:46:25 AM EST

     Subject:    RE: SHAKSPER: Adventures in Original Pronunciation 

 

[2] From:        William Blanton < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

     Date:         February 19, 2015 at 4:12:41 PM EST

     Subject:    Re: SHAKSPER: Adventures in Original Pronunciation 

 

 

[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------

From:        John Drakakis < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         February 19, 2015 at 7:46:25 AM EST

Subject:    RE: SHAKSPER: Adventures in Original Pronunciation

 

>Look at Launcelot Gobbo’s first speech. Launcelot argues with his

>conscience >about leaving Shylock, his boss. It’s the old devil on 

>one shoulder, angel on the other routine. Shakespeare doesn’t 

>use the word devil though, he uses fiend. Big deal, right? Well, 

>you hear it in OP and all of a sudden fiend isn’t pronounced 

>“feend,” like we say it today, but like “fend.” So it sounds like the 

>word friend, kind of like it’s spelled in modern English where the 

>two are just a single “r” removed.

>

>That’s interesting. Why did Shakespeare use the word fiend? It’s 

>a prose speech so he didn’t need to worry about fitting a metrical 

>pattern. He could have used devil—he uses it later in the speech 

>and elsewhere in the play. Why fiend? It’s interesting, right? Now,

>with that OP in mind, look at the end of the speech:

>

>“The fiend gives the more friendly council.”

>

>Isn’t that cool? All of a sudden there’s a new relationship between

>“fiend” and “friendly” that isn’t there in modern English.

>

>That’s one of the joys of OP.

 

I’m not persuaded by this at all. 

 

(a) some thought needs to be given to the speech-prefix ‘Gobbo’

 

(b) ‘fiend’ and ‘friendly’ do NOT require speculation about pronunciation, surely. The interposition of a consonant transforms the ‘fiend’s’ advice into ‘friendly’ advice. A more interesting example, if you want to stick with ‘fend’ is the reference in King Lear to ‘the forfended place’ i.e. female genitals, that raises a host of questions.

 

Cheers

John D 

 

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------

From:        William Blanton < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         February 19, 2015 at 4:12:41 PM EST

Subject:    Re: SHAKSPER: Adventures in Original Pronunciation

 

Shakespeare (who ought to know) spelled Launcelet’s last name as “Jobbe.” He emphasized this name by repeating it several times in the speech you referenced. 

 

     Certainely, my conscience will serve me to run 

     from this Jew my Maister : the fiend is at mine elbow,

     and tempts me, saying to me, Jobbe, Launcelet Jobbe, good

     Launcelet, or good Jobbe, or good Launcelet Jobbe, use

     your legs, take the start, run awaie: my conscience saies

     no; take heede honest Launcelet, take heed honest Jobbe,

     or as afore-said honest Launcelet Jobbe... 

 

He spelled it this way in both the First Quarto and in the version included in the First Folio. These are the only two editions of the play that have been recognized as authentic.

 

Why did he spell it this way when he immediately introduced Old Gobbo as Launcelet’s father?

 

He did it to bring into the play by reference the Book of Job, in which God made a deal with the Devil. Shakespeare also referenced Faustus’s Good Angel and Bad Angel, each giving opposite advice. Faustus made a deal with the Devil.  And, as you observed, Launcelet referred to Shylock as “the divell himselfe: certainly the Jew is the verie divell incarnation.” Antonio made a deal with the Devil.

 

Later in the play, Solanio says, “let me say Amen betimes, least the divell crosse my praier, for here he comes in the likenes of a Jew. How now Shylocke... .” Shakespeare wrote Shylocke as the Devil, poorly disguised as a Jew. 

 

Shakespeare thus made Shylock’s dual identity clear, at least for those who choose to take Shakespeare’s words seriously.

 

These facts should not affect your production. I assume that modern editors took it upon themselves to rename one of Shakespeare’s characters to avoid confusing the reader/audience as to Launcelet’s relationship to Old Gobbo. No one these days would understand what Shakespeare was up to when he wrote Shylock as the Devil (although this does explain why Shylock said simply “I am content” after Antonio and the Duke forced him to become a Christian. As the Devil, he really was content to be made part of the Christian community, from which he had previously been excluded). 

 

I hope you videotape your production and post it somewhere.

 

Good luck.

 

Bill 

 
 
Folger Shakespeare Library New Look

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 26.073  Thursday, 19 February 2015

 

From:        Hardy Cook < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         February 19, 2015 at 11:29:26 AM EST

Subject:    Folger Shakespeare Library

 

 

http://www.folger.edu/

 

The Folger Shakespeare Library has a crisp new look thanks to SHAKSPERean Eric Johnson, Director of Digital Access, and Dr. Sarah Werner, Digital Media Strategist

 

Eric Johnson

Director of Digital Access

 

Mr. Johnson joined the Library in April 2013 as the first Director of Digital Access. He manages the Folger’s various digital programs, and oversees the journal Shakespeare Quarterly and Folger Editions series of Shakespeare’s complete works. He became known to the Shakespearean community as the creator of Open Source Shakespeare, one of the most widely-used resources in the field. Before coming to the Folger, he developed successful online initiatives for a wide variety of public- and private-sector organizations. He holds an MA in English and a BA in history, and heads the board of advisors for the College of Humanities and Social Sciences at George Mason University. He is also a veteran of the US Marine Corps. Mr. Johnson has a distinguished track record of anticipating the digital use and dissemination of literary texts. 

 
 
Shakespeare and the Visual Arts. The Italian Influence - EXTENDED DEADLINE

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 26.072  Thursday, 19 February 2015

 

From:        Michele Marrapodi < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         February 18, 2015 at 3:18:49 PM EST

Subject:    Shakespeare and the Visual Arts. The Italian Influence - EXTENDED DEADLINE 

 

Dear SHAKSPER Members,

 

THE EDITORS AND PUBLISHER HAVE DECIDED TO EXTEND THE DEADLINE UNTIL 28 FEBRUARY 2015.

 

Call for Papers

 

SHAKESPEARE AND THE VISUAL ARTS:

The Italian Influence

 

Edited by

Michele Marrapodi and Keir Elam

 

Critical investigation into the rubric of “Shakespeare and the visual arts” has generally focused on the influence exerted by the works of Shakespeare on a number of artists, painters, and sculptors in the course of the centuries. Drawing on the poetics of intertextuality, and profiting from the more recent concepts of cultural mobility and permeability between cultures in the early modern period, this volume will study instead the use or mention of Renaissance material arts and artists in Shakespeare’s oeuvre. Among the great variety of possible topics, contributors may like to consider:

 

- the impact of optics and pictorial perspective on the plays or poems;

- anamorphosis and trompe l’oeil effects on the whole range of visual representation;  

- the rhetoric of “verbal painting” in dramatic and poetic discourse; 

- the actual citation of classical and Renaissance artists;

- the legacy of iconographic topoi;

- the humanistic debate or Paragone of the Sister Arts;

- the use of emblems and emblematic language; 

- explicit and implicit ekphrasis and ekphrastic passages in the plays or poems;

- ekphrastic intertextuality, etc.

 

Contributors are invited to submit proposals by 28 FEBRUARY 2015 to the addresses of the editors below. They should send a one-page abstract of their proposed chapter on the relationship between the age of Shakespeare and Renaissance visual culture, including theoretical approaches to the arts in the drama of Shakespeare and his contemporaries. Each abstract (approx. 300 words) should include the author’s name, email, affiliation, and title of the proposed contribution.

 

Best wishes.

 

Prof. Michele Marrapodi

University of Palermo, Italy.

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

Prof. Keir Elam

University of Bologna, Italy.

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 
 
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