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Play Deconstruction Into Monologues, Dialogues, and Asides

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 25.401  Tuesday, 9 September 2014

 

From:        Zhanna Rozenberg < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         September 4, 2014 at 3:52:50 PM EDT

Subject:    Play Deconstruction Into Monologues, Dialogues, and Asides.

 

I'm working on a project using Shakespeare's plays. I was wondering if you knew of any resource that take a particularly play and classifies each line w/ whether it's part of a soliloquy/monologue, an aside, or part of a dialogue and who is privy to hear the words. Ideally I would like something like this (a sample from the Act 1, Scene 1, of Romeo & Juliet):

 

Source:

http://www.shakespeare-navigators.com/romeo/T11.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

Speaker

Line

Type

Listener/Recipient

SAMPSON

1 Gregory, o' my word, we'll not carry coals.

Dialogue

Gregory

GREGORY

2 No, for then we should be colliers.

Dialogue

Sampson

SAMPSON

3 I mean, and we be in choler, we'll draw.

Dialogue

Gregory

..

..

..

..

Stage Direction

Enter two other servingmen: [ABRAHAM and BALTHASAR].

 

 

SAMPSON

33 My naked weapon is out. Quarrel, I will back

Dialogue

Gregory

SAMPSON

34 thee.

Dialogue

Gregory

GREGORY

35 How! turn thy back and run?

Dialogue

Sampson

..

..

..

..

SAMPSON

42 Nay, as they dare. I will bite my thumb at them;

Dialogue

Gregory

SAMPSON

43 which is a disgrace to them, if they bear it.

Dialogue

Gregory

ABRAHAM

44 Do you bite your thumb at us, sir?

Dialogue

Gregory, Sampson, Balthasar

SAMPSON

45 I do bite my thumb, sir.

Dialogue

Gregory, Abraham, Balthasar

ABRAHAM

46 Do you bite your thumb at us, sir?

Dialogue

Gregory, Sampson, Balthasar

SAMPSON

47 Is the law of our side, if I say

Aside

Gregory

SAMPSON

48 ay?

Aside

Gregory

GREGORY

49 No.

Aside

Sampson

 

 

 

 

I’ve found a number of resources which offer the entirety of the play as is, and also resources which just offer the monologues. Do you know of any resource which has classified Shakespeare’s plays in the manner described? Alternatively, can you recommend someone else who might know?

 

Thanks for your time and your help.

 

Sincerely,

Zhanna Rozenberg

 
 
A Musical ‘Winter’s Tale’

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 25.3800  Tuesday, 9 September 2014

 

From:        Hardy M. Cook < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         September 9, 2014 at 8:45:28 AM EDT

Subject:    A Musical ‘Winter’s Tale’ 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/09/08/theater/a-musical-winters-tale-breezes-through-central-park.html?_r=0

 

With Fur and Song, Transforming the Tragic

A Musical ‘Winter’s Tale’ Breezes Through Central Park

 

By Charles Isherwood

Sept. 7, 2014

 

Exeunt the Muppets.”

 

To my firm knowledge, that is a stage direction neither Shakespeare nor his early editors ever wrote. And yet there they are in all their feathery or furry cuteness, Big Bird and Elmo and Cookie Monster, romping on the stage of the Delacorte Theater in Central Park in the new musical adaptation of “The Winter’s Tale” that was presented for just three performances, through Sunday night, under the auspices of the Public Theater’s Public Works program.

 

Why these visitors from the distant galaxy of 20th century should be paying a visit to Shakespeare’s Bohemia may not be clear. Anyone looking for rigorous logic and textual purity will want to skip this freehanded, freewheeling production, directed by Lear deBessonet and adapted by Ms. deBessonet and Todd Almond, who also composed the original songs that are sprinkled liberally throughout.

 

The show — and quite a show it is, with a cast of some 200 and the kind of splashy musical numbers you expect to see on Broadway — employs professional actors, notably the superlative comedian Christopher Fitzgerald, alongside a host of newcomers to the stage. New Yorkers from all five boroughs squeezed in rehearsals for the production while continuing their day jobs in any number of fields. A few day care centers across the city may also have been fairly sparse for a few days over the past month, since a boisterous swarm of children also sing, dance and make adorable funny faces in the show.

 

Like a similar production of “The Tempest” created last summer, this “Winter’s Tale” is part civic-outreach project and part professional production. (The program defines the Public Works mission as creating “theater that is not only for the people, but by and of the people as well.”) If it doesn’t hit the sweet spot in terms of presenting a stimulating version of Shakespeare’s complex late romance, it certainly spritzes the steamy post-summer air with an invigorating sense of excitement and discovery on the part of both its professional and its nonprofessional cast.

 

In addition to presiding over the four-member band on a corner of the stage, Mr. Almond plays the role of Antigonus, the subject of perhaps the most famous stage direction in Shakespeare: “Exit, pursued by a bear.” (In the spirit of the production, the bear is cute as can be; if you had to meet an ursine end, this frisky fellow would be the way to go.) The courtly and dryly funny Mr. Almond also provides generous doses of narration to lead us through the thickets of Shakespeare’s complicated plot, which is helpful indeed, since much of the text has been excised or rewritten.

 

The bones of the story remain in place, of course. We open in Sicilia, where King Leontes (a suitably ferocious Isaiah Johnson) falls quickly into a fit of jealousy when he imagines his queen, Hermione (Lindsay Mendez) and the great friend of his youth, Polixenes, the King of Bohemia (Michael Roberts), have been fooling around. His fury upends the court, as his son Mamillius (Elijah Olivo) wastes away and dies, as does, it appears, the wronged Hermione. Leontes repents his deranged passion only after his newborn daughter, to be named Perdita, has been left by Antigonus to die on the stormy shores of Bohemia.

 

Well, that’s the sad part, and it’s dispatched fairly quickly. (The intermissionless production runs about 1 hour 40 minutes.) Mr. Almond speeds things along by turning soliloquies into songs that effectively capture the mood of the text while dispensing with most of Shakespeare’s verse. The production then moves to the wilds of Bohemia, where Perdita has been raised by a shepherd (an amiably grizzled H. Sebastian Arteta) with the assistance of a clown (a nicely gawky David Turner).

 

Time, as personified with professional aplomb and admirable diction by the charming young Jennifer Levine, has passed. Some 16 years have gone by, she reminds us. Perdita (a likable Idania Quezada) has become a bubbly young maiden who will fall for the charms of Polixenes’s son Florizel, played with high spirits by Javier Spivey.

 

With the move to Bohemia, merry hell breaks loose on the Delacorte’s stage, under the delightful supervision (or subversion) of Mr. Fitzgerald’s terrific Autolycus, a nimble thief who smoothly separates several members of the audience from their wallets and cellphones. (All in fun, of course.) Here we are treated to a sheepshearing hoedown, with a stage full of performers in multiethnic attire performing countrified choreography (by Chase Brock) to Mr. Almond’s percolating music.

 

[ . . . ]

 
 
Mark Rylance - Stephen Fry Twelfth Night Film News

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 25.399  Tuesday, 9 September 2014

 

From:        Hardy Cook < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         September 9, 2014 at 8:43:59 AM EDT

Subject:    Mark Rylance - Stephen Fry Twelfth Night Film News 

 

http://www.theatermania.com/new-york-city-theater/news/globe-on-screen-preview_69789.html

 

Mark Rylance and Stephen Fry Will Bring Their Twelfth Night to the Big Screen

 

Shakespeare’s comedy, along with five other Bard plays, will come to American cinemas via Globe on Screen.

 

One of the highlights of the 2013-14 Broadway season was the Shakespeare’s Globe revival of Twelfth Night, which earned its star, Mark Rylance, his third Tony Award for his luminous performance as the love-struck Olivia. If you were bummed that you missed Tim Carroll’s delightful production, which also starred Tony nominees Stephen Fry and Paul Chahidi as Malvolio and Maria, you’re in luck. As part of the company’s Globe on Screen initiative, Twelfth Night will hit American cinemas, filmed in HD under the stars at the Globe in London’s South Bank, beginning September 16.

 

And that’s not all Globe on Screen has in store. The company will also present five other titles from their catalog in U.S. movie theaters throughout the fall. Here’s a preview of what’s in store.

 

Twelfth Night
In theaters from Tuesday, September 16

Director: Tim Carroll

Principal cast: Mark Rylance as Olivia, Stephen Fry as Malvolio, Paul Chahidi as Maria, Johnny Flynn as Viola, Samuel Barnett as Sebastian

 

Henry V

In theaters from Tuesday, September 30

Director: Dominic Dromgoole

Principal cast: Jamie Parker as Henry V, Sam Cox as Pistol, Olivia Ross as Princess Katherine

 

The Taming of the Shrew

In theaters from Tuesday, October 14

Director: Toby Frow
Principal cast: Samantha Spiro as Katharina, Simon Paisley Day as Petruchio

 

The Tempest
In theaters from Tuesday, October 28

Director: Jeremy Herrin

Principal cast: Roger Allam as Prospero, Colin Morgan as Ariel, Jessie Buckley as Miranda

 

Macbeth
In theaters from Tuesday, November 11

Director: Eve Best

Principal cast: Joseph Millson as Macbeth, Samantha Spiro as Lady Macbeth

 

A Midsummer Night's Dream
In theaters from Thursday, December 4

Director: Dominic Dromgoole

Principal cast: Michelle Terry as Titania, John Light as Oberon, Olivia Ross as Hermia, Sarah MacRae as Helena, Joshua Silver as Demetrius, Luke Thompson as Lysander, Pearce Qugley as Bottom

 
 
Folger Shakespeare Library Featured on CBS

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 25.398  Tuesday, 9 September 2014

 

From:        Hardy M. Cook < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         September 4, 2014 at 11:07:56 AM EDT

Subject:    Folger Shakespeare Library Featured on CBS

 

CBS This Morning takes you inside the Folger Shakespeare Library:

 

http://www.cbsnews.com/videos/largest-shakespeare-collection-preserved-at-washingtons-folger-library/

 

September 4, 2014, 8:44 AM

 

The Folger Shakespeare Library houses the world’s largest collection of printed works by the “Bard of Avon” as well as countless other literary gems. 

 

 
Still Dealing in Intimacy After All These Years

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 25.397  Tuesday, 9 September 2014

 

From:        Hardy M. Cook < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         September 3, 2014 at 10:47:14 AM EDT

Subject:    Still Dealing in Intimacy After All These Years

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/09/03/theater/ophelia-re-envisioned-in-imagining-o.html

 

Richard Schechner, 80, talks about his latest work, “Imagining O,” and pairing erotica and contemporary avant-garde.

 

Still Dealing in Intimacy After All These Years

Ophelia Re-envisioned in ‘Imagining O’

 

By Alexis Soloski

Sept. 2, 2014

 

Two women, robed in black, gazed at each other across a low table at the Alexander Kasser Theater at Montclair State University. They were rehearsing “Imagining O,” Richard Schechner’s reinvention of Shakespeare’s “Hamlet” and Pauline Réage’s novel “The Story of O,” which opens next Wednesday as part of the Peak Performances series. Mr. Schechner, as brash as he is gentle, asked the actresses to work the scene again. “I want absolute intimacy,” he said.

 

A performance studies professor at New York University and a seminal figure of the New York avant-garde art scene, Mr. Schechner has never shied away from intimacy. With the Performance Group, he conceived audacious, sexually explicit works like “Dionysus in 69” and “The Balcony,” which blurred lines between actor and audience, art and life. He’s still blurring them.

 

“Imagining O” — created by Mr. Schechner; his co-director, Benjamin Mosse; and the movement director Roanna Mitchell — spills out past the Kasser’s stage into its lobbies and onto its balconies and lawns. Audience members are broken into small groups and shuttled from scene to scene before being reunited and required to complete one of several provocative activities, like feeding flowers to an actress playing Ophelia, before advancing to the play’s conclusion.

 

Mr. Schechner recently turned 80, but age doesn’t seem to have dulled him. “You tell me how many 80-year-olds can do this,” he said, pulling his bare feet into a perfect lotus pose. On a break from rehearsal, he spoke about adapting erotica and the contemporary avant-garde. These are excerpts from the conversation.

 

Q. Do you always direct barefoot?

A. I do. I start every rehearsal with yoga. I’m more comfortable barefoot.

 

Q. What led you to combine Shakespeare’s “Hamlet” and “The Story of O”?

 

A. I’ve been long obsessed with “Hamlet.” It’s a play you can never unravel. Ophelia is a woman who doesn’t really get a chance to express herself, who commits suicide. I thought, what is Ophelia, if all of these men fall away? And I found this being who reminded me of O. I said: “Oh my God! O! Ophelia!” It all seemed to come together.

 

[ . . . ]

 
 
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