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Globe Theatre 2015 Season Announced

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 25.462  Wednesday, 26 November 2014

 

From:        Hardy Cook < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         November 21, 2014 at 9:46:32 AM EST

Subject:    Globe Theatre 2015 Season Announced

 

Globe Theatre 2015 Season Announced

 

April - October 2015

 

PRIORITY BOOKING FOR FRIENDS & PATRONS: Tuesday 13 January 2015

 

PUBLIC BOOKING: Monday 9 February 2015

 

 

Our Artistic Director Dominic Dromgoole’s last summer season at the Globe examines the theme of Justice & Mercy and will include productions of The Merchant of Venice, As You Like It, Dromgoole-directed Measure For Measure, Richard II, and a rare chance to see King John.

                  

The season will also bring three new plays: Helen Edmundson's critically acclaimed The Heresy of Love, a contemporary adaptation of The Oresteia, and Nell Gwynn by Jessica Swale.

                  

Next year’s touring productions include Romeo & Juliet and Much Ado About Nothing, meanwhile our two-year Hamlet world tour continues. 

 

We also welcome back our international Globe to Globe programme with two Chinese productions this summer; Richard III in Mandarin and Macbeth in Cantonese (both with scene synopses in English).

 

 

THE MERCHANT OF VENICE

By William Shakespeare

23 April - 7 June

 

ROMEO & JULIET

By William Shakespeare

27 April - 8 May

 

AS YOU LIKE IT

By William Shakespeare

15 May - 5 September

 

KING JOHN

By William Shakespeare

1 – 28 June

 

MEASURE FOR MEASURE

By William Shakespeare

20 June - 17 October

 

RICHARD III (in Mandarin)

By William Shakespeare

20 July – 25 July

 

THE HERESY OF LOVE

By Helen Edmundson

3 August – 5 September

 

MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING

By William Shakespeare

10 August - 12 September

 

 

MACBETH (in Cantonese)

By William Shakespeare    

17 August – 23 August

 

THE ORESTEIA

By Aeschylus

29 August - 16 October

 

NELL GWYNN

By Jessica Swale

19 September – 17 October

 

RICHARD II

By William Shakespeare

26 September - 18 October

 
 
What Shakespeare taught me about Marxism

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 25.461  Wednesday, 26 November 2014

 

From:        Bo Bergstrom < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         November 2, 2014 at 9:01:36 PM EST

Subject:    What Shakespeare taught me about Marxism

 

This article excerpt is from The Guardian.

 

http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2014/nov/02/sharkespeare-marxism-feudalism-capitalism

 

What Shakespeare taught me about Marxism

Paul Mason

 

If you could watch Shakespeare’s history plays back-to-back, starting with King John and ending with Henry VIII, it would, at first sight, be like an HBO drama series without a central plot: murders, wars and mayhem, all set within an apparently meaningless squabble between kings and dukes.

 

But once you understand what a “mode of production” is the meaning becomes clear. What you are watching is the collapse of feudalism and the emergence of early capitalism.

 

The mode of production is one of the most powerful ideas to come out of Marxist economics: it was prefigured by Adam Smith, who divided economic history into “modes of subsistence”, but in the hands of Marx himself, and subsequent historians who took a materialist viewpoint, it has shaped our view of the past.

 

Feudalism was an economic system based on obligation: peasants were obliged to hand part of their produce to the landowner and do military service for him; he in turn was obliged to provide the king with taxes, and supply an army on demand.

 

But in the England of Shakespeare’s history plays, the mainspring of the system has broken down. By the time Richard III was slaughtering his extended family in real life, the whole power network based on obligation had been polluted by money: rents paid in money, military service paid for with money, wars fought with the aid of a  cross-border banking network stretching to Florence and Amsterdam.

 

Once you accept that feudalism existed, and capitalism does, there’s a big academic debate about what caused the collapse of feudalism and the rise of capitalism. Shakespeare managed to get to the essence of it without having knowledge of the terms feudalism and capitalism. Feudalism was a word invented to describe medieval society once it was over, by 17th century historians. As for capitalism, Shakespeare had seen only the earliest form of it, yet he described it well.

 

In the comedies and tragedies – which are about the contemporary society the audience lived in – we are suddenly in a world of bankers, merchants, companies, mercenary soldiers and republics. The typical place in these plays is a prosperous trading city, not a castle. The typical hero is a person whose greatness is essentially bourgeois self-made, either through courage (Othello), humanist philosophy (Hamlet and Prospero) or knowledge of the law (Portia in The Merchant of Venice).

 

But Shakespeare had no clue about where this was going to lead. He saw and described what a society that could print books, sail to the Americas, chart the heavens accurately was doing to the human character: empowering us with knowledge, yet leaving us susceptible to greed, passion, self-doubt and power-craziness on a scale unknown by the peasants and serfs of feudal Europe. Another 150 years would pass until merchant capitalism, based on trade, conquest and slavery, would give birth to industrial capitalism.

 

For this reason, whenever I want to stop myself being too Marxist, I think about Shakespeare. Armed with a few history books and a profound humanism, he described the society around him with peerless insight, and tried to explain to his audience how they’d got there.

 

[ . . . ]

 
 
Book Announcement: Shakespeare and the Imprints of Performance

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 25.460  Wednesday, 26 November 2014

 

From:        Gavin Paul < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:        November 26, 2014 at 12:37:42 AM EST

Subject:    Book Announcement: Shakespeare and the Imprints of Performance

 

Book Announcement: Shakespeare and the Imprints of Performance.

J. Gavin Paul

 

Palgrave Macmillan, 2014

http://www.palgrave.com/page/detail/shakespeare-and-the-imprints-of-performance-j-gavin-paul/?K=9781137438430

 

Gavin Paul

Arts One Interdisciplinary Program

University of British Columbia

 
 
NEH Summer Workshops

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 25.459  Wednesday, 26 November 2014

 

[1] From:        Lee Aylward < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

     Date:         November 20, 2014 at 2:48:54 PM EST

     Subject:    NEH Summer 2015 workshop for teachers

 

[2] From:        Megan Estes < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

     Date:        November 24, 2014 at 2:42:16 PM EST

     Subject:    NEH Seminar offered at Amherst College Summer 2015 

 

 

[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------

From:        Lee Aylward < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         November 20, 2014 at 2:48:54 PM EST

Subject:    NEH Summer 2015 workshop for teachers 

 

Good News!  The National Endowment for the Humanities, through its Landmarks in American History and Culture Program, will support two week-long workshops celebrating the heritage of the Mississippi Delta.  The Most Southern Place on Earth:  Music, Culture and History in the Mississippi Delta will explore the region’s impact on America’s music, foodways, civil rights, literary heritage, and political landscape.  Workshops will be offered to thirty seven participants each between June 21-17 and July 12-18, 2015.  They are open to K-12 teachers, including public, private, and home school, and librarians.  Five graduate credit hours may be earned.  This will be the sixth year of NEH support for this exciting workshop.

Stipends of $1200 are available.  Complete information and application materials are available from the Delta Center for Culture and Learning at http://deltacenterforcultureandlearning.com/southern-place-workshop/   and additional information is provided by NEH at http://www.neh.gov/projects/landmarks-schools.html.  The Directors of the workshop are Dr. Luther Brown ( This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it  and Lee Aylward ( This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .) A special participant will be Dr. Rolando Herts ( This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it ,) the new Director of the Delta Center for Culture and Learning.

 

Lee Brigham Aylward

Program Associate for Education and Community Outreach

Delta State University

Delta Center for Culture and Learning

Mississippi Delta National Heritage Area

DSU Box 3152

Cleveland, MS 38733

Office:  662-846-4310

Cell:  662-721-7591

Fax:  662-846-4701

www.deltacenterforcultureandlearning.com

https://www.facebook.com/#!/TheDeltaCenter

www.msdeltaheritage.com  

https://www.facebook.com/MDNHA

 

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------

From:        Megan Estes < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:        November 24, 2014 at 2:42:16 PM EST

Subject:    NEH Seminar offered at Amherst College Summer 2015

 

SUMMER SEMINAR ON PUNISHMENT, POLITICS, AND CULTURE

 

Amherst College will host a National Endowment for the Humanities Summer Seminar for K-12 teachers and current full time graduate students who intend to pursue a career in K-12 teaching, from June 28-July 31, 2015.  The seminar will be directed by Austin Sarat of the Departments of Political Science and Law, Jurisprudence and Social Thought.  It will examine three questions:  What is punishment and why do we punish as we do?   What can we learn about politics, law, and culture in the United States from an examination of our practices of punishment?  What are the appropriate limits of punishment?  The application deadline is March 2, 2015.  Information is available at http://www.amherst.edu/go/neh.  If you have any questions regarding the seminar or the application process, contact Megan Estes at (413)542-2380 or email  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

 

*Any views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this program do not necessarily reflect those of the National Endowment for the Humanities.*

 

Megan L. Estes Ryan

Academic Coordinator

Law, Jurisprudence & Social Thought

Amherst College

PO Box 5000

Amherst, MA   01002

413-542-2380

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 
 
Shakespeare in Venice Summer School: The Shylock Project

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 25.458  Wednesday, 26 November 2014

 

From:        Maria Ida Biggi < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         November 19, 2014 at 10:42:12 AM EST

Subject:    Shakespeare in Venice Summer School: The Shylock Project

 

Fondazione Giorgio Cini - Università Ca'Foscari Venezia

 

Shakespeare in Venice Summer School

Giorgio Cini Foundation, Venice

15 June - 11 July 2015

 

"The Shylock Project" 

 

An intensive four-week course of study exploring the text and contexts of Shakespeare's The Merchant of Venice. A rich program of lectures and creative workshops by leading scholars, actors, and musicians held in the beautiful San Giorgio monastery will be complemented by theatre performances and excursions to the Jewish Ghetto and other Venetian sites. A unique full-immersion experience aimed at creating the first historical production of the play in the Ghetto of Venice in the year of its quincentennial (1516-2016).

 

Bill Alexander, Shaul Bassi, László Benke, Maria Ida Biggi, Jerry Brotton, Donatella Calabi, Dario Calimani, Thomas Cartelli, Kent Cartwright, Matthew Chiorini, Monica Chojnacka, Roberta Cimarosti, Fernando Cioni, Karin Coonrod, Eugenio de'Giorgi, Valerio de Scarpis, Péter Dávidházi, Tobias Döring, Paul Edmondson, Keir Elam, Tibor Fabiny, Stephen Greenblatt, Galit Hasan-Rokem, Loretta Innocenti, Géza Kállay, M. Lindsay Kaplan, David Scott Kastan, Simon Levis Sullam, Jacques Lezra, Piergabriele Mancuso, Stephen Orgel, Avraham Oz, Natália Pikli, Loredana Polezzi, Freddie Rokem, Carol Chillington Rutter, David Schalkwyk, Alessandro Serpieri, James Shapiro, Michael Shapiro, Stuart Sillars, B.J. Sokol, Boika Sokolova, Werner Sollors, Ramie Targoff, Laura Tosi, Stanley Wells, Suzanne Wofford.

 

The Summer School welcomes international graduate students, faculty members, teachers, and independent scholars.

 

Information:  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it   

 

Application deadline: 15 February 2015

 
 
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