CFP: SASMARS, Stellenbosch, 26-28 August, 2016

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 26.308  Wednesday, 2 July 2015

 

From:        Leonie Viljoen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         Tuesday, Jun 30, 2015 at 10:55 AM

Subject:    CFP: SASMARS, Stellenbosch, 26-28 August, 2016 

 

Call for Papers

Southern African Society for Medieval and Renaissance Studies Conference 

26 – 28th  August, 2016

 

We are pleased to announce that the 23rd biennial conference of SASMARS will be held at Mont Fleur in Stellenbosch, South Africa on 26 – 28th August 2016.

 

“Texts and Transformations: Medieval and Early Modern Cultures”

Medieval and Early Modern societies weathered various socio-cultural transformations, ranging from economic developments to religious conflicts, across a range of different geographies and in urban and rural spaces.  How did poetry, theatre, prose, visual art, architecture, and other forms of art respond to such changes?  How do we historically understand and assess various kinds of social transitions?

 

Topics for this conference can include but are not limited to:

 

· Adaptions of classical texts and artworks

· Translation of texts and ideas

· Contemporary readings of old texts

· Cross-cultural interactions and influences

· Historical transitions and periodisation

· Religious reform

· Urban renewal and development

· Medieval and Early Modern studies in contemporary education

· Appropriations of Medieval and Early Modern culture

· Cultural responses to economic change

· Representations of political dissent and rebellion

· Utopias and dystopias

· Gender, sexuality, and social change

 

Deadline:  A conference proposal and a short biography to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. by 30 November 2015.  Any inquires can be directed to the same email address.

 

The CFP has been posted to our website at http://sasmarsnewsletter.blogspot.com/

 

Please send other items for the newsletter to me by 12 July.

 

Kind regards

Leonie Viljoen

 

 

 

Shakespeare and Nordic Music (Call for Panel Presenters)

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 26.307  Wednesday, 2 July 2015

 

From:        Michelle Assay <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         June 29, 2015 at 12:44:14 PM EDT

Subject:    Shakespeare and Nordic Music (Call for Panel Presenters)

 

Reminder:

 

Call for Panel Presenters: ‘Shakespeare and Nordic Music’, (deadline for abstracts 1 July, 2015)

 

International Conference 'Shakespeare and Scandinavia', Kingston University, 8-11 October, Kingston-upon-Thames

 

http://blogs.kingston.ac.uk/ssku/calls-for-panel-presenters-deadline-for-abstracts-1-july-2015/

 

From the songs of Christoph Ernst Friedrich Weyse and Peter Arnold Heise to Finnish folk-rock group Apulanta (‘Today Shakespeare was born and died’) Shakespeare has figured in many branches of Nordic music without ever gaining the kind of prominence that major operatic settings accorded him in other European cultural centres. Probably the most significant contribution is Sibelius’s score for The Tempest (1925-26) consisting of more than an hour of some of his finest music. But lesser-known contributions by Sibelius’s compatriot Aulis Sallinen (King Lear opera, 2000), his Danish contemporary Carl Nielsen (incidental music for Shakespeare celebrations, 1916), Norwegian Arne Nordheim (a Tempest ballet in 1979, incidental music to King Lear in 1985, various vocal/ensemble settings with electronic background), and even Grieg (‘Watchman’s Song’ from Macbeth, c. 1867) begin to suggest a more significant picture than has been passed down to us.

 

Papers are invited on any aspect of Shakespeare and Nordic Music, covering all genres, styles and historical periods, and techniques of reworking, not excluding musical responses less concrete than text-settings or tone poems directly on Shakespearean themes. Questions of national temperament may also be addressed: is it mere essentialism to propose, for instance, that Nordic artists are instinctively drawn to those dramas that stress elemental natural forces and emotional bleakness – as the examples cited above would seem to indicate – rather than to, say, Shakespeare’s ‘Southern’ subjects?

 

Panel convenors: Michelle Assay (Universities of Sheffield and Paris Sorbonne) and David Fanning (University of Manchester)

 

Please forward abstracts of no more than 500 words, and a brief bio (2-3 sentences), to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.">This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. and This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.">This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. and This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.">This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. by 1 July, 2015.

 

Michelle Assay

Université Paris Sorbonne, University of Sheffield

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Search

Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.