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Shakespeare Plays and Festivals

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 25.306  Monday, 7 July 2014

 

[1] From:        Hardy M. Cook < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

     Date:         Monday, July 7, 2014

     Subject:    Shakespeare Plays and Festivals

 

[2] From:        Thomas M Lahey < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

     Date:         July 5, 2014 at 12:56:51 AM EDT

     Subject:    Re: SHAKSPER: Shakespeare Plays and Festivals

 

[3] From:        Mari Bonomi < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

     Date:         July 4, 2014 at 12:46:28 PM EDT

     Subject:    SHAKSPER: Shakespeare Plays and Festivals 

 

[4] From:        Kristin Denslow < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

     Date:         July 4, 2014 at 9:45:53 PM EDT

     Subject:    Addition to Plays and Festivals page

 

[5] From:        Lois Leveen < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

     Date:         July 5, 2014 at 10:51:50 PM EDT

     Subject:    Re: SHAKSPER: Shakespeare Plays and Festivals 

 

 

[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------

From:        Hardy M. Cook < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         Monday, July 7, 2014

Subject:    Shakespeare Plays and Festivals

 

Thanks to the contributors below who supplied corrections or additions to the updated Shakespeare Plays and Festivals list. 

 

I have made these corrections/additions and welcome any others that subscribers send me. This list is both for the present and is an historical record of summer Shakespeare in 2014, so even if your festival/productions/so on are over you can submit the information for this list.

 

I am also deeply gratified for those who answered my call for volunteers to assist me with some of the SHAKSER web site duties. I have gotten back to some and will continue as the week proceeds.

 

These are great opportunities, and I am exceedingly grateful for all assistance and am reasonably accomplished at writing letters for tenure and promotion. So if you have interest in lending a hand, email me and I will let you know what could be taken on.

 

Eventually, I wish to appoint contributing and associate editors, looking to the day when someone might take over editing duties from me during my what will be ever increasing absences. In fact, I will be away from July 18th to 27th without Internet access and then I leave for England for a couple of weeks where I will be able to continue to edit SHAKSPER. 

 

After my daughter Rebecca’s graduation in June, I plan to pursue more frequently my own interests of travel and of sitting and watching my breath for 12 to 18 hours a day.

 

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------

From:        Thomas M Lahey < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         July 5, 2014 at 12:56:51 AM EDT

Subject:    Re: SHAKSPER: Shakespeare Plays and Festivals 

 

It appears you know the aphorism, “There is no success without succession!”

 

Way to go,

Tom

 

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------

From:        Mari Bonomi < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         July 4, 2014 at 12:46:28 PM EDT

Subject:    SHAKSPER: Shakespeare Plays and Festivals

 

A most useful list, in general. Much appreciation for the work done on compiling it!

 

The plays listed for the American Shakespeare Center, however, are incorrect. Those three were the spring productions. This summer is Macbeth, Comedy of Errors, and Cyrano de Bergerac.

 

And I believe another list member said he was doing Lear in Connecticut this summer as well.

 

Mari Bonomi

 

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------

From:        Kristin Denslow < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         July 4, 2014 at 9:45:53 PM EDT

Subject:    Addition to Plays and Festivals page

 

Hello,

 

After seeing the Shakespeare Plays and Festivals update, I noticed a Wisconsin summer Shakespeare theater missing from the list.

 

Door Shakespeare, Baileys Harbor, July 5-August 16. King Lear and The Comedy of Errors. www.doorshakespeare.com.

 

Best,

Kristin Denslow

 

[5]-------------------------------------------------------------

From:        Lois Leveen < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         July 5, 2014 at 10:51:50 PM EDT

Subject:    Re: SHAKSPER: Shakespeare Plays and Festivals 

 

I’m sure it is nearly impossible to compile a list that is truly comprehensive, but SHAKESPER readers might be interested in knowing that Portland, Oregon, has taken on the complete works, to be presented by a variety of companies between April 2014 and April 2016. For a city of around half a million, without huge arts funding, it’s quite a project, and already off to a nice start.  http://www.completeworksproject.org/

 

-Lois Leveen

 
 
Latest Issues of Shakespeare Magazine

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 25.305  Monday, 7 July 2014

 

From:        Hardy Cook < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         July 4, 2014 at 4:05:13 PM EDT

Subject:    Latest Issues of Shakespeare Magazine

 

http://www.shakespearemagazine.com/latest-issues/

 

ABOUT

 

A warm welcome to the website of Shakespeare Magazine!

 

As you’d expect from the name, it’s a magazine dedicated to exploring and celebrating the life and works of William Shakespeare.

 

We launched our first issue on 23 April 2014, as the world celebrated 450 years since the birth of the Bard.

 

We’ve quickly found readers in all corners of the globe, and it’s clear that Shakespeare Magazine is a truly international publication.

 

Shakespeare is England’s greatest gift to the world, so Shakespeare Magazine is completely free to anyone and everyone, no matter who you are or where you are.

 

The Shakespeare Magazine website is a place where you can read the latest issue of the magazine and peruse the latest Shakespeare News.

 

You can also follow our Twitter feed (with other social media channels coming soon). And we’ll be posting Shakespeare features, offers and competitions that won’t be available elsewhere.

 

Shakespeare Magazine aims to give a new voice to Shakespeare fans everywhere. I hope you’ll visit us often.

 

Enjoy your magazine and website.

 

Pat Reid

Founder & Editor, Shakespeare Magazine

 
 
Shakespeare Plays and Festivals (Updated June 1, 2014)

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 25.304  Friday, 4 July 2014

 

From:        Hardy M. Cook < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         Friday, July 4, 2014

Subject:    Shakespeare Plays and Festivals (Updated June 1, 2014)

 

My sincerest thanks to Louise Geddes, Assistant Professor of English, Adelphi University, who compiled the updated Shakespeare Plays and Festivals List (Updated June 1, 2014).

 

The List is located in the Scholarly Resources section of the SHAKSPER web site: http://shaksper.net/scholarly-resources/shakespeare-festivals-and-plays

 

Louise is one of the people who stepped forward and volunteered to take on small task involved with SHAKSPER and the SHAKSPER web site. My thanks to her and to all volunteers. If you would like to volunteer, send an email to This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it and I will let you know some of the opportunities I am looking to have taken care of with the long-term goal of appointing contributing and associate editors.

 

Hardy

 
 
Hugh Grady Named Professor Emeritus at Arcadia

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 25.303  Friday, 4 July 2014

 

From:        Hardy Cook < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         July 3, 2014 at 9:35:57 AM EDT

Subject:    Hugh Grady Named Professor Emeritus at Arcadia 

 

[Editor’s Note: Congratulations, Hugh!]

 

http://bulletin.arcadia.edu/2014/07/dr-hugh-grady-named-professor-emeritus-at-arcadia-university/

 

 

Dr. Hugh Grady Named Professor Emeritus at Arcadia University

 

Dr. Hugh Grady, a preeminent Shakespearean scholar who taught English literature and writing at Arcadia University for 27 years, has been named professor emeritus at the University. Grady, who retired from Arcadia following the 2013-14 academic year, is commended for his dedication to teaching, his extraordinary scholarship in the field of literature, and his years of service to Arcadia.

 

Grady began teaching at Arcadia in 1987. He taught undergraduate and graduate courses in writing, literature, and critical theory, and organized and instructed the senior Capstone course in English, familiarizing students with literary theory and helping them develop their undergraduate theses. Grady, who also chaired the English department, was promoted to full professor in 1999.

 

Grady has authored several books on Shakespeare and Renaissance literature, including Shakespeare and Impure Aesthetics (2009), Shakespeare, Machiavelli, and Montaigne: Power and Subjectivity from “Richard II” to “Hamlet” (2002), Shakespeare’s Universal Wolf: Postmodernist Studies in Early Modern Reification (1994), andThe Modernist Shakespeare: Critical Texts in a Material World (1995). He also has published more than 30 articles in journals and anthologies, coedited Shakespeare and the Urgency of Now: Criticism and Theory in the 21st Century (2013), and edited and contributed to Empson, Wilson Knight, Barber, KottGreat Shakespeareans (2012), an anthology of critical essays focusing on Shakespeare’s reception by the major modern critics.

 

“I am honored to receive this distinction from the University and President Christensen and look forward to a continued relationship with the Arcadia community,” said Grady. “I plan an active retirement of continued scholarship, writing, and occasional part-time teaching in the future. Arcadia has been a big part of my life for the last 27 years, and I have many fond memories of working and teaching here.”

 

After receiving a bachelor’s degree in English from Fordham University, Grady spent a year volunteering with Americorps VISTA. He briefly taught high school French and English before pursuing a master’s degree in English and a doctorate in comparative literature from the University of Texas at Austin. Following his work as a senior assistant editor for the anthology Shakespearean Criticism, Grady taught English at Temple University before joining Arcadia.

 

In 1990 and 2004, Grady won the Ellington Beavers Faculty Award for Intellectual Inquiry at Arcadia, which is designed to encourage and recognize faculty inquiry in the scholarly and creative realms. He was named Arcadia Professor of the Year for the 2001-02 school year, and in 2004, he was awarded a National Endowment for the Humanities Summer Stipend for research.

 
 
Learning ‘Lear’

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 25.302  Wednesday, 2 July 2014

 

From:        David Richman < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         July 1, 2014 at 7:23:07 PM EDT

Subject:    Lithgow Lear

 

Like John Lithgow, I too have been working on Lear; performed it four times in Library Park, Waterbury Connecticut, during the last days of June, and have six more performances scheduled for Guilford, Connecticut, Aug 6 to 10; and a final performance in Newtown, August 23. I must respectfully disagree with John Lithgow. Lear, I think, does not slide into dementia. His madness releases him from inhibitions—and permits him to tell painful and difficult truths about himself and others; his topics range from incest, through poverty, to injustice. His remarks to Gloucester, in verse, are as sane as they are heart wrenching. The problem in the first two acts is to find the proper balance between rage and pain. Too much rage, and he forfeits the sympathy needful to sustain audience interest. Too much pain, and the necessary awe gives way to pity; and, as Medea tells us, pity is brother to contempt. 

 

This seems to be a year of Lears. Is a sense of rising injustice connected with a resurgence of interest in this play? 

 

David Richman 

 
 
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