Advice

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 26.322  Tuesday, 14 July 2015

 

From:        Stephen Greenblatt <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         July 10, 2015 at 8:54:17 AM EDT

Subject:    Re: Advice

 

[Editor’s Note: I e-mailed Prof Greenblatt the suggestions from last week and received the reply below. –Hardy]

 

Many thanks for these excellent and interesting suggestions.    I will definitely keep them in mind when I do the juggling act of the TOC.

 

With gratitude,

 

Stephen

 

Book Announcement - The senses in early modern England, 1558–1660

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 26.321  Tuesday, 14 July 2015

 

From:        Rebecca Mortimer <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         July 13, 2015 at 7:20:34 AM EDT

Subject:    Book Announcement - The senses in early modern England, 1558–1660

 

Dear All,

 

I am writing with regards to a forthcoming publication which may be of interest to you, The senses in early modern England, 1558–1660

 

Editors: Simon SmithJacqueline Watson and Amy Kenny 

Hardback

ISBN: 978-0-7190-9158-2 

Manchester University Press 

 

Considering a wide range of early modern texts, performances and artworks, the essays in this collection demonstrate how attention to the senses illuminates the literature, art and culture of early modern England. Examining canonical and less familiar literary works alongside early modern texts ranging from medical treatises to conduct manuals via puritan polemic and popular ballads, the collection offers a new view of the senses in early modern England.

The volume offers dedicated essays on each of the five senses, each relating works of art to their cultural moments, whilst elsewhere the volume considers the senses collectively in particular cultural contexts. It also pursues the sensory experiences that early modern subjects encountered through the very acts of engaging with texts, performances and artworks. This book will appeal to scholars of early modern literature and culture, to those working in sensory studies, and to anyone interested in the art and life of early modern England.

 

Kind regards,

Rebecca Mortimer

Sales and Marketing Executive 

History, Literature and Theatre

www.manchesteruniversitypress.co.uk

 

Addition to Festivals List

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 26.320  Tuesday, 14 July 2015

 

From:        Kristin Backert <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         July 3, 2015 at 8:36:03 PM EDT

Subject:    Addition to Festivals List

 

Hello, SHAKSPEReans, 

 

I’ve been asked to add a new company to the festivals list:

 

Country: Czech Republic

Prague Shakespeare Company, Prague. 2015-16 season TBA. http://www.pragueshakespeare.com/

 

It has now been added to the list that can be found here:

 

http://shaksper.net/scholarly-resources/shakespeare-festivals-and-plays

 

 

Kristin 

 

Advice

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 26.319  Thursday, 9 July 2015

 

[1] From:        Tom Bishop <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

     Date:         July 8, 2015 at 5:55:21 PM EDT

     Subject:    Re: SHAKSPER: Advice 

 

[2] From:        Duncan Salkeld <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

     Date:         July 8, 2015 at 4:38:43 PM EDT

     Subject:    Re: SHAKSPER: Advice 

 

 

[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------

From:        Tom Bishop <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         July 8, 2015 at 5:55:21 PM EDT

Subject:    Re: SHAKSPER: Advice

 

I am writing to you, as a scholar and teacher of Renaissance English literature, to ask your advice. We are beginning the process of preparing a new edition  - the 10th — of the Norton Anthology of English Literature. In the particular section which I edit — the 16th century and early 17th century — I think I will be able, without serious cuts, to make one significant addition of a new text or a new “cluster” of shorter texts (such as the one we currently have on the sonnets).  I attach a PDF with the current table of contents.

 

So the question is, what should I choose?  What would make the most significant impact? What is most annoyingly or strikingly absent?  What would help an undergraduate course you have been teaching or could imagine teaching in this period?  

 

I am grateful to you for any suggestions. And, as I wear another hat, as the General Editor of the whole thing, I would be grateful for suggestions you might have for additions or changes to any of the period volumes.

 

With best wishes,

Stephen Greenblatt

 

Dear Professor Greenblatt,

 

I suppose it’s inevitable that a reader of a LISTSERV devoted to Shakespeare will note that sixteenth century drama, as currently represented in the Norton Anthology, seems to start quite suddenly at Christopher Marlowe. This has always been a stumbling block for those teaching drama from the Anthology, since even for Faustus they have to explain how the Good and Evil Angels would have been quite familiar to early audiences. So my own bid would be for a play from earlier in the century, there currently being none. It might be too upsetting to established period boundaries to include one of the later Mystery plays, though recent scholarship has emphasised how late the surviving redacted MSS from Coventry and Chester are, but one of the later moralities might pass muster (and would allow a link to Spenser’s way of proceeding in FQ 1 also). Redford’s Wit and Science would serve well but is, alas, missing its beginning. Even that old favourite Everyman would work, especially if one could argue that its translation witnesses to the international character of humanist culture.  

 

For smaller passages of significance, I've always felt the selections from Fox don't include his most powerful and influential sequences, such as the deaths of Latimer and Ridley or, even more famously, of Cranmer. 

 

Tom Bishop

 

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------

From:        Duncan Salkeld <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         July 8, 2015 at 4:38:43 PM EDT

Subject:    Re: SHAKSPER: Advice

 

I imagine everyone will have their hobbyhorse, but perhaps a section devoted to early modern London, which is where, after all most Renaissance writers lived at least for a while, and where they were published. Lawrence Manley’s edited collection entitled London in the Age of Shakespeare (Croom Helm, 1986) is a very worthwhile compendium of extracts and shorter texts, so would provide a useful starting point for thinking about selections.

 

Best wishes

Duncan Salkeld

CFP for Critical Survey: Special Issue on Shakespeare and War

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 26.318  Thursday, 9 July 2015

 

From:        Larry Weiss <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         July 8, 2015 at 5:00:43 PM EDT

Subject:    Re: SHAKSPER: CFP War

 

 

Will there be a prize for the paper that most convincingly shows that Shakespeare was opposed to “intensive Western military engagement in Iraq, Afghanistan and Libya”?  As that involvement was to a great extent a response to intense Middle Eastern “engagement” in the West, most prominently (but by no means exclusively) exemplified by the events which have come be to known as 9/11 and 7/7, perhaps Othello’s reaction in Aleppo to the “malignant ... Turk [who] beat a Venetian and traduc’d the state” is a microcosm.

 

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