“Non Nobis” and “Te Deum”

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 26.315  Wednesday, 8 July 2015

 

[1] From:        Robert Appelbaum <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

     Date:         July 2, 2015 at 5:17:20 PM EDT

     Subject:    Non nobis 

 

[2] From:        Dennis Taylor <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

     Date:         July 8, 2015 at 11:07:30 AM EDT

     Subject:    Re: SHAKSPER: Non Nobis 

  

 

[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------

From:        Robert Appelbaum <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         July 2, 2015 at 5:17:20 PM EDT

Subject:    Non nobis

 

Do scholars believe that some version of Non Nobis was actually sung at early performances of Henry V? And is there a tradition of later performances that include it?

 

I have been curious about this for years, ever since the first time I saw Branagh’s Henry V and such a beautiful interlude was made of an imaginary chorus singing it (with a newly invented melody) in the background, while the horrors of war are examined by the camera, in a scene that doesn’t exist in Shakespeare. 

 

Robert Appelbaum

Professor of English Literature

Engelska Institutionen

Uppsala Universitet

http://www.engelska.uu.se/Personal/Appelbaum

www.robertappelbaum.com

 

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------

From:        Dennis Taylor <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         July 8, 2015 at 11:07:30 AM EDT

Subject:    Re: SHAKSPER: Non Nobis

 

Re: SHAKSPER: Non Nobis, to St. Crispin 

 

Many thanks for the helpful discussion about Non Nobis, clearly an item not relevant to the “debate about Shakespeare as Catholic” (Prof. Hamlin).

 

But what about the repeated references to St. Crispin (and Crispinian—S. may be combining the two), mentioned only briefly in the Chronicles?

 

An earlier listserv post found St. Crispin mentioned in the BCP, but this did not occur until 1662, I believe; I am happy to be corrected.  In Shakespeare’s time, these saints were apparently retained in some almanacs and popular memory and kept alive in “[s]ecret Catholic publications” (David Cressy). Jonathan Baldo discusses the issue whether Shakespeare is catholicizing a national holiday, or nationalizing a Catholic one.  Maurice Hunt has some good words on Shakespeare’s syncretism here.  And Alison Chapman explores the cobbler dimension.

 

But what a blizzard of references, 9 by my count!  Am I wrong to be amazed?

 

For your bemusement, Anna Barbauld responded in 1775 to the controversial Catholicity, as she perceived it, of Henry’s citation of Crispin: “let us not be superstitiously afraid of superstition … It is true, this principle has been much abused: it has given rise to pilgrimages innumerable, worship of relics, and priestly power.  But let us not carry our ideas of purity and simplicity so far … Who does not enter into the sentiment of the Poet, in that passage so full of nature and truth: ‘He that outlives this hour, and comes safe home … Will yearly on the vigil feast his neighbors, / And say, Tomorrow is St. Crispian’” (“Thoughts on the Devotional Taste on Sects, and on Establishments”). Compare Colley Cibber’s puzzled reaction to King John.

 

Dennis Taylor

Emeritus Professor, English, Boston College

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

 

Advice

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 26.314  Wednesday, 8 July 2015

 

From:        Stephen Greenblatt <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         July 3, 2015 at 3:43:11 AM EDT

Subject:    Advice

 

Dear Colleague,

 

I am writing to you, as a scholar and teacher of Renaissance English literature, to ask your advice. We are beginning the process of preparing a new edition  - the 10th — of the Norton Anthology of English Literature. In the particular section which I edit — the 16th century and early 17th century — I think I will be able, without serious cuts, to make one significant addition of a new text or a new “cluster” of shorter texts (such as the one we currently have on the sonnets).  I attach a PDF with the current table of contents.

 

So the question is, what should I choose?  What would make the most significant impact? What is most annoyingly or strikingly absent?  What would help an undergraduate course you have been teaching or could imagine teaching in this period?  

 

I am grateful to you for any suggestions. And, as I wear another hat, as the General Editor of the whole thing, I would be grateful for suggestions you might have for additions or changes to any of the period volumes.

 

With best wishes,

Stephen Greenblatt  

 

 

TOC of Norton Anthology 16th Century Literature:  pdf Norton 16thcentury TOC (123 KB)

 

New Issue Announcement - Cahiers Elisabethains 87.1 (Spring 2015)

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 26.313  Wednesday, 8 July 2015

 

From:        Rebecca Mortimer <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         July 3, 2015 at 7:14:27 AM EDT

Subject:    New Issue Announcement - Cahiers Elisabethains 87.1 (Spring 2015)

 

*Apologies for cross-posting*

 

The Saint-Omer First Folio: Perspectives on a New Shakespearean Discovery

Mayer, Jean-Christophe

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7227/CE.87.1.1

 

'Needful Woe': Tragedy, King John and the Gods

Luis-Martinez, Zenon

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7227/CE.87.1.2

 

Staging the Sherleys' Travails

Hutchings, Mark

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7227/CE.87.1.3

 

Grave Relations: Hamlet, Jyuran Hisao's 'Hamuretto', the Emperor and the War

Ashizu, Kaori

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7227/CE.87.1.4

 

France and the Norman Lamord in Hamlet

Ovens, Michael

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7227/CE.87.1.5

 

Masking and Unmasking in Verdi's Falstaff: (Meta)theatrical Tour de Force in L'Opera de Tours

Fischer, Susan L.

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7227/CE.87.1.6

 

Play Reviews

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7227/CE.87.1.7

 

Shakespeare and Emotion: A Review Essay

Sullivan, Erin

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7227/CE.87.1.8

 

Book Reviews

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7227/CE.87.1.9

 

Books Received

 

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7227/CE.87.1.10

 

CFP for Critical Survey: Special Issue on Shakespeare and War

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 26.312  Wednesday, 8 July 2015

 

From:        Patrick Gray <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         July 3, 2015 at 7:01:32 AM EDT

Subject:    CFP for Critical Survey: Special Issue on Shakespeare and War

 

CFP for Critical Survey: Special Issue on “Shakespeare and War”

 

CALL FOR PAPERS: Critical Survey Special Issue

Shakespeare and War

Guest Editor: Patrick Gray, Durham University

 

The tercentenary of Shakespeare’s death fell in 1916, in the midst of the First World War, and the quatercentenary will fall next year, 2016, amid what looks likely to be continuing conflict in the Middle East, in the wake of more than two decades of intensive Western military engagement in Iraq, Afghanistan, and Libya.

 

Recent research on Shakespeare and war includes Franziska Quabeck, Just and Unjust Wars in Shakespeare (2013); Irena Makaryk and Marissa McHugh, eds., Shakespeare and the Second World War (2012); Paola Pugliatti, Shakespeare and the Just War Tradition (2010); and Ros King and Paul Franssen, eds., Shakespeare and War (2009).

 

Notable recent productions include Ivo van Hove’s Kings of War (2015), re-imagining Henry V1-3 Henry VI, and Richard III, as well as the BBC’s acclaimed Hollow Crown miniseries (2012), presenting Shakespeare’s second tetralogy of English history plays. If production plans hold, the second season of the series, The Wars of the Roses, presenting the first tetralogy, will appear next year in 2016.

 

In light of this critical and popular interest, as well as current events, Critical Survey invites essays in the range of 5,000 to 7,000 words, inclusive, on any aspect of the connection between Shakespeare and war, to be submitted by 15 January 2016. Innovative critical approaches will be considered, as well as historicist scholarship; in keeping with the aims of Critical Survey, the only core requirement is language that is clear, concise, and accessible.  

 

Informal inquiries about possibilities for essays, as well as proposals for book reviews, performance reviews, and review essays, are welcome and encouraged. Please direct all correspondence to the guest editor, Patrick Gray, at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

 

Submissions should be sent by 15 January 2016 by email to the same address, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., as Microsoft Word documents. Two hard copies, anonymized for peer review, should also be sent, along with a separate cover letter, to the mailing address for Critical Survey: 

 

Critical Survey
English Literature Group
School of Humanities
University of Hertfordshire

A style guide and additional submission information is available online: 

 

http://journals.berghahnbooks.com/cs/

 

Patrick Gray

Lecturer in Shakespeare and Renaissance Literature

Department of English Studies

Durham University

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

 

https://www.dur.ac.uk/english.studies/academicstaff/?id=11777

 

MV Dialog

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 26.311  Wednesday, 2 July 2015

 

From:        John Drakakis <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         June 30, 2015 at 7:15:04 AM EDT

Subject:    RE: SHAKSPER: MV Dialog

 

Re: SHAKSPER: 29 June 2015, MV Dialog

 

Dear Bill,

 

What went over your head has to do with the context in which you excavate particular textual details. In a range of Shakespeare texts, the instability of language becomes a central issue. I see this as having to do with the spread of print culture and the onus that it places on readers to interpret texts. Machiavelli is a key figure in this debate, and thee Prologue to The Jew of Malta is helpful here when Machevil says “I weigh not men and therefore not men’s words”.  Equivocation is an extension of this, and is the means whereby meaning istelf becomes unstable.  This, of course, would be crucial in a culture that had still not forsaken an investment in ‘orality’. The remnant of this in modern popular culture is in the genre of the Western where (a) the hero was always as good as his word - a terrific brief debate in Sam Peckinpah’s ‘The Wild Bunch’ between William Holden and Ernest Borgnine, where Holden defends a decision by saying that he gave his ‘word’. Borgnine’s morally equivocal response is to say that what matters is ‘who you give your word to’ and (b) where the Indians always accused the while man of ‘speaking with forked tongue’. We have no problem with the duplicity of language - our politicians do it all the time. For a culture that still valued the integrity of face-to-face communication this was a serious issue, and the theatre as an ‘oral’ medium foregrounded the problems that it raised.

 

So in MV when Bassanio chooses the leaden casket (after having made a number of denigratory comments about the seductive duplicity of female beauty) he is responding to an issue of moment: nothing is quite what it seems. Shakespeare takes this up again in Othello where the villain says: “I am not what I am”, or in Macbeth: “There is no art to find the mind’s construction in the face”. 

 

The point is that reading a renaissance play isn’t like reading a novel, and the discipline of ‘reading’ in the early modern period (where reading, in this sense was an innovation) is rather different from what we think of as reading. 

 

I hope this helps

 

As Ever

John D

 

 

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