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T.S. and Groucho

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 25.301  Wednesday, 2 July 2014

 

From:        Lawrence Weiss < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         June 30, 2014 at 4:28:07 PM EDT

Subject:    Re: SHAKSPER: Tom & Groucho

 

Lee Siegel’s psychoanalysis of the brief, polite and none-to-philosophical or literary exchange between Julius (“Groucho”) Marx and Thomas Stearns Eliot, for which we have only sketchy fragments (there probably wasn’t much more), in which each appears to admire the other and deprecate himself, like Siegel’s deconstruction of the entire Marx Brothers oeuvre, might contain some truth. Then again, as someone familiar with psychoanalysis once said, perhaps à propos of Groucho, “sometimes a cigar is just a cigar.”

 
 
4th of July Weekend Reading

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 25.300  Wednesday, 2 July 2014

 

From:        Steve Sohmer < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         July 1, 2014 at 2:00:35 PM EDT

Subject:    4th of July Weekend Reading

 

Dear Friends,

 

Anyone wishing to take a break from scholarly pursuits over the 4th of July weekend might enjoy my new political thriller, 'The Right', which is available FREE on Kindle until 5 July.

 

Have a great weekend!

 

Steve

 
 
Interview with Ben Crystal about Original Pronunciation

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 25.299  Wednesday, 2 July 2014

 

From:        Kirk McElhearn < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         July 1, 2014 at 6:36:05 AM EDT

Subject:    Interview with Ben Crystal about Original Pronunciation

 

I interviewed Ben Crystal recently, discussing original pronunciation and Shakespeare. It would have been better if I could have included some of the examples he spoke, but I include a YouTube video where he and his father, David Crystal, give some examples of how OP works.

 

http://www.mcelhearn.com/how-was-shakespeare-pronounced-ben-crystal-discusses-original-pronunciation/

 

Kirk

 
 
DMU’s ‘Paperless Professor’ Hailed As One Of Britain’s Best Teachers

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 25.298  Wednesday, 2 July 2014

 

From:        Hardy Cook < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         July 2, 2014 at 8:46:14 AM EDT

Subject:    DMU’s ‘Paperless Professor’ Hailed As One Of Britain’s Best Teachers

 

[Editor’s Note: Congratulations Gabriel. –Hardy]

 

http://www.dmu.ac.uk/about-dmu/news/2014/june/dmus-paperless-professor-hailed-as-one-of-britains-best-teachers.aspx

 

DMU’s ‘Paperless Professor’ hailed as one of Britain’s best teachers 

 

De Montfort University (DMU)’s ‘paperless professor’ has today been named as one of Britain’s best teachers.

 

Professor of Shakespeare Studies, Gabriel Egan, is one of 55 higher education staff to be awarded National Teaching Fellowships by the Higher Education Academy in recognition of excellence in teaching and learning.

 

DMU has now had 18 National Teaching Fellows since the initiative was launched—one of the highest numbers in higher education.

 

Prof Egan has been entirely paperless since he was a student in 1990 and now produces electronic learning materials for his students and scans copies of Shakespeare’s folios for his research.

 

He said: “Shakespeare, as usual, said it best: "Thou hast most traitorously corrupted the youth of the realm . . . thou hast built a paper-mill" (Shakespeare Henry 6 Part Two IV.vii.30-35).

 

“He might easily have been talking about how universities are drowning in paper. To adapt another famous line from that play, ‘The first thing we do let's destroy all the filing cabinets’.”

 

Prof Egan has been paperless since he started his undergraduate English degree in 1990. 

 

“Rather than taking notes on paper in lectures, I keyed them into one of Clive Sinclair’s less-successful devices, a Z88 portable computer, and then at the end of each day I downloaded my notes to a desktop PC,” he said. “When reading books, rather than annotate them to make my notes, I would create notes files on my PC. The point of all this was to be able to find the notes again by searching all the files.

 

“I have worked this way ever since and never kept my notes on paper, never used a filing cabinet. I can still search all my undergraduate notes and everything else created ever since (including all my emails ever sent or received) with a simple command.”

 

He has scanned all his books, journal articles and course copies. “Now, wherever I am, I have with me 3000 books, 5000 journal articles, and every word I've ever read or written, with me on my laptop. Geography makes no difference: I'm as well (or as little) able to answer any question when I'm in my office as when I'm on an aeroplane.” 

 

Prof Egan, director of the Centre for Textual Studies in DMU’s School of Humanities, has built computer models of the theatre for which Shakespeare wrote, the 1599 Globe.

 

He has also made available a large collection of digital materials including an interactive map of early modern London, a smartphone app and a hour of documentary film, collectively called Shakespearean London Theatres (ShaLT). When training research students to become academics, he introduces them to advanced techniques for creating and curating one's own large digital databases of teaching and research materials, and in teaching undergraduates he uses open source and open access principles to show just how English Studies can be transformed by the new technologies for storing, analysing, and disseminating writing.  

 

The successful National Teaching Fellows (NTFs) were chosen from more than 180 nominations submitted by higher education institutions across England, Northern Ireland and Wales. 

 

Each will receive an award of £10,000 to support their professional development.

 

Professor Stephanie Marshall, Chief Executive of the HEA, said: “Our students deserve the best possible learning experience and it is colleagues like those we celebrate today who can make a real difference to their futures. I congratulate all the successful Fellows and wish them every success in their own learning and teaching experiences.”

 

Successful nominees were nominated by their institutions and had to show evidence of three criteria: individual excellence, raising the profile of excellence and developing excellence.

 
The National Archives’ priceless handwritten Shakespeare documents recognised by UNESCO

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 25.297  Wednesday, 2 July 2014

 

From:        Hardy Cook < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         July 1, 2014 at 8:06:22 AM EDT

Subject:    The National Archives’ priceless handwritten Shakespeare documents recognised by UNESCO

 

http://www.culture24.org.uk/history-and-heritage/literature-and-music/art487329-The-National-Archives-priceless-handwritten-Shakespeare-documents-recognised-by-UNESCO

 

The National Archives' priceless handwritten Shakespeare documents recognised by UNESCO

By Richard Moss

20 June 2014

 

A unique and valuable set of handwritten Shakespeare documents held at the National Archives gets UNESCO recognition

 

A unique series of Shakespeare documents, including the will bearing his signature, held at The National Archives have been accepted on to the UNESCO Memory of the World UK Register.

 

Announced in Edinburgh last night the papers relating to the playwright’s life and work were nominated by The National Archives, together with a set from the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust.

 

The largest collection of its kind, the National Archives’ holding of Shakespeare documents features nearly half of all known contemporary references to the Bard’s life and provides a priceless perspective on Shakespeare’s life in London. 

 

They show him appearing as a resident in the Elizabethan city, with the documentary trail then charting his rise in fortune, both professional and financial, reaching the heady heights of success at Court.

 

All of the nominated documents are handwritten sources bearing Shakespeare’s signature and were each discovered following pain staking research in the centuries after the playwright’s death. 

 

They include a letter patent issued under warrants carrying the signet and privy seal authorising Shakespeare and his companions to perform plays throughout the realm under royal patronage. 

 

An account of Edmund Tylney, Master of the Revels for 1604-5 lists plays performed at Court and William Shakespeare’s will made 25 March 1616 and authenticated  22 June 1616 bears his signature. 

 

“It is testament to their importance not only to the UK but to the literary and cultural world globally,” said Clem Brohier, Acting Chief Executive and Keeper of The National Archives. 

 

“They provide a tangible connection to Shakespeare allowing us to get closer to a man who died nearly 400 years ago yet continues to have an unparalleled influence on language and culture in the UK and beyond.”

 

The inclusion by UNESCO in the UK Register complements the UNESCO Memory of the World International Register, which is a catalogue of documentary heritage of global significance and outstanding universal value.

 

There will be an opportunity for the public to see some of the valuable documents in 2016 when The National Archives stages a programme of events to mark the 400th anniversary of the playwright’s death. 

 
 
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