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Global Shakespeare (with Warwick)

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 25.165  Wednesday, 2 April 2014

 

From:        Hardy M. Cook < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         April 2, 2014 at 10:58:33 AM EDT

Subject:    Global Shakespeare (with Warwick)

 

http://www.qmul.ac.uk/postgraduate/coursefinder/courses/125726.html

 

Global Shakespeare (with University of Warwick)

Master of Arts (1 year Full-time / 2 years Part-time )

 

Overview

 

This is the only programme in the UK to focus on Shakespeare through the eyes of others. It allows you to form a critical perspective on Shakespeare as a global cultural phenomenon from Elizabethan England to the twenty-first century. You will examine the afterlife of his plays as they have been read, performed, adapted and translated not only linguistically but in performance practices, cultural contexts and various forms of new media across the world.

 

The programme combines theoretical, historical, performance and pedagogical approaches, with a strong digital and new-media component. You will be involved in developing cutting-edge methodologies for understanding Shakespeare as a product and catalyst of globalisation.

 

The Global Shakespeare MA provides a unique opportunity to experience postgraduate life with two world-leading institutions with strong expertise in the fields of Shakespeare, Renaissance studies, performance and Modern Languages- Queen Mary University of London (QML) and The University of Warwick. You will spend the first semester at QML, and spend time in the heart of London, accessing a wide variety of theatrical performances in venues such as the Globe, Donmar Warehouse, National Theatre and visiting the unrivaled museums, libraries and archives of the capital. The second semester, spent at the University of Warwick, will see you in close proximity to Stratford-upon-Avon with access to performance at the Royal Shakespeare Company (RSC) and the outstanding research facilities of the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust.

 

On this programme you will:

  • Have access to the expertise and scholarship at both institutions
  • Benefit from webinars with established Shakespeareans across the globe such as Brazil, South Africa, Italy and China
  • Attend performances of Shakespeare at local theatres and engage with actors and directors in London and Stratford-upon-Avon
  • Learn academic journalism through editorial experience and reviewing on the new electronic journal – Global Shakespeare
  • Engage with local communities in exploring the significance of Shakespeare for them

This programme is ideal for graduates wishing to enter careers in academia, research, cultural organisations, theatres, teaching, publishing and new media.

 

 

Structure

 

The MA Global Shakespeare is available for one year full-time and two years part-time. You will spend semester one at QML and semester two at Warwick. You can choose at which institution you spend your dissertation period.

 

You will take four assessed modules before proceeding to a 15,000-word dissertation.

 

Part-time students take one module per semester, spreading the course over two years.

 

Full-time

Assessed modules are taught in weekly two-hour seminars. In addition to these timetabled sessions, you will attend discussions and seminars on local Shakespeare productions and with visiting Shakespeareans from across the globe. You will be expected to attend meetings with your adviser and course tutor. The progress of your dissertation will be discussed in sessions with a designated supervisor. You will also need to undertake independent learning and research in order to progress at the required level.

 

Part-time

Part-time students take one assessed module per semester. You are encouraged to begin work on your dissertation at the end of the first year. Teaching is generally done during the day.

 

Compulsory modules

At Queen Mary University of London:

  • Global Shakespeare: History and Theory and Performance

This module introduces you to historical, methodological and material dimensions of studying Shakespeare in a global context by a generic study and close reading of Shakespeare and his writing in a historical context, and an examination of the afterlife of his plays as they have been read, performed, adapted and translated both linguistically and through various media in a global context.

 

At the University of Warwick: Practices of Translation: Or How to Do Things with Shakespeare

This module focuses on the transformations of Shakespeare’s texts by a range of translational practices, in the broadest sense of the word. Offering you the chance to experiment with different models of translation it will allow you to develop your own models and practice as a “translator” of Shakespeare in relation to performance criticism, literary translation and active pedagogy, especially in relation to the ways in which Shakespeare has been 'translated' into languages, performance practices, cultural contexts and in the new media across the world.

 

Optional modules

You will choose two modules from a full list of options across varied disciplines such as English, Drama and Theatre, Modern Languages, History and Geography.

 

At QML options may include:

  • Global Interests in the Shakespearian World
  • Public and Private Cultures in Renaissance England
  • Post-colonialism Language and Identity
  • Early Modern Drama in Performance

 

At Warwick options may include:

  • Reviewing Shakespeare
  • World Literature and World Systems
  • Translation Studies in Theory and Practice
  • The Legacies of Caliban in Latin America and the Caribbean

 

For more information contact:

Anna Boneham

Executive Officer Global Shakespeare

Email:  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Phone: +44 (0)20 78826670

 
 
The Sonnets

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 25.164  Tuesday, 1 April 2014

 

[1] From:        Harry Berger Jr < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

     Date:         March 31, 2014 at 3:19:11 PM EDT

     Subject:    Re: SHAKSPER: Sonnets 

 

[2] From:        Ian Steere < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

     Date:         April 1, 2014 at 5:19:58 AM EDT

     Subject:    Sonnets 

 

[3] From:        John Drakakis < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

     Date:         April 1, 2014 at 6:58:11 AM EDT

     Subject:    RE: SHAKSPER: Sonnets 

 

 

[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------

From:        Harry Berger Jr < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         March 31, 2014 at 3:19:11 PM EDT

Subject:    Re: SHAKSPER: Sonnets

 

>there is, I suggest again: no rational reason to dismiss 

>the probability of pervasive biography in the Sonnets. 

 

Sure, let’s accept this probability. But let’s also accept the probability that these are complex poems which invite close reading. The question then is, what sort of biography emerges from the generalizations specifically derived from close reading?

 

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------

From:        Ian Steere < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         April 1, 2014 at 5:19:58 AM EDT

Subject:    Sonnets

 

At the beginning of the exchanges on this thread were posed the challenges: what evidence is there (i) for a male addressee of Sonnet 18 and (ii) for the dating of the latter to 1595.

 

In response, I provided relevant evidence of probability—albeit that this suggested an original dating some months prior to the first publication (in 1593) of Venus & Adonis.

 

So far, that evidence remains intact despite testing within this thread (and, over some years, from a wide spectrum of Shakespearean commentators). Consequently, there is little need at this stage to elaborate on my earlier comments.

 

However, it is fun to stray from the subject or to indulge in flights of fancy, unsullied by such gross considerations as “evidence”. I am moved, therefore, to follow the example of David Basch and to offer competing opinion on a line in Sonnet 20, which he has highlighted: “A man in hew all Hews in his controwling” (albeit that David’s note did not reveal that the second “hew” is further distinguished by its italicized reproduction in the original printing).

 

In my 2010 translation of the Sonnets, I rendered this line as follows: A man in kind, all kinds in his control. I reasoned that “hew” could mean”carve” (a sense extant in the English of the time). This sense aligns with the pun perceptible later in the sonnet, which evokes a man as a creation of Mother Nature (by her skilled shaping of raw material): But since she prickt thee out for womens pleasure. (Of course, the pun also depicts the addressee as being equipped with a prick).

 

With this slant, the interpretation of “Hews” as a collective noun - meaning carvings or results thereof - represents unremarkable poetic shorthand. I suggested that the unusual upper case letter, “H”, and the italicization of the word represented the poet’s intention to convey that this collective noun represented a special case of carvings, ie human beings. Accordingly, the line may reasonably be expanded to the form of the following prose: “A man who has manly attributes and who is able to charm people of each sex and every ilk, and bend them to his will”.

 

Interestingly, the line thus interpreted mirrors the characteristics of a young man, described elsewhere within the original printing of Shake-speares Sonnets:

 

That he did in the general bosom reign

Of young, of old, and sexes both enchanted,

To dwell with him in thoughts, or to remain

In personal duty, following where he haunted:

Consents bewitch'd, ere he desire, have granted,

And dialogued for him what he would say,

Ask'd their own wills and made their wills obey.

 

None of this, of course, removes the carnality suggested in Sonnet 20, which David is so anxious to avoid.   

 

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------

From:        John Drakakis < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         April 1, 2014 at 6:58:11 AM EDT

Subject:    RE: SHAKSPER: Sonnets

 

Harry Berger makes an excellent point that radically disrupts any attempt to provide a coherent and knowing narrative for the Sonnets as a developmental sequence. Re-reading them recently I was struck by how many of them seem to echo issues that crop up in the plays. e.g. Sonnet 134 and The Merchant of Venice. We could follow through themes that appear in Much Ado, Othello, and Macbeth. Of course, there is no way of knowing whether these sonnets were written at the same time as plays with which they might be thematically (or even structurally) linked, or whether these are retrospective reflections. It is clear that Shakespeare and co. reworked issues in successive plays but . . . 

 

Also Harry’s point about the identity of the speaker raises some fundamental questions about how we might construct a subjectivity (and a history) and what critical and analytical tools we might use to do so.

 

Cheers

John D

 
 
Lukas Erne's Book Trade (Correction)

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 25.163  Tuesday, 1 April 2014

 

From:        Hardy M. Cook < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         Tuesday, April 1, 2014

Subject:    Lukas Erne's Book Trade (Correction)

 

In Steve Roth’s submission of yesterday, I mistakenly made a change that he did not intended. I have corrected the passage below and in the archive to read as Steve wished it to read. My apologies. 

 

______

3. By arguably his most prized audience, Elizabeth and James’ courtiers.

 

These were also the most educated, attentive, and perspicacious of his customers, those who (Shakespeare could hope) would plumb the density, complexity, allusions, and multilevel ironies he offered up. (Think: Jonson’s frequently expressed obsession with this audience, and Hamlet’s “caviary to the general.”)

 
 
‘King Lear,’ With Michael Pennington

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 25.162  Tuesday, 1 April 2014

 

From:        John Crowley < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         March 31, 2014 at 8:44:58 PM EDT

Subject:    Re: SHAKSPER: Quiet Lears

 

I thought of another thing about Laughton’s quiet Lear. He said that he discerned that this was the right way to enact Lear through a study of the punctuation in various original editions (I don’t remember which ones) which he assumed, I guess, expressed Shakespeare’s intentions (which may be doubted). If I ever do come upon a reference for this story, I will send. 

 
 
Black Death

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 25.161  Tuesday, 1 April 2014

 

From:        Hardy M. Cook < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         March 31, 2014 at 2:44:25 PM EDT

Subject:    Black Death Was Not Spread by Rat Fleas

 

[Editor’s Note: The following article appeared in The Guardian. And, no, this is not an April Fool's joke.–Hardy] 

 

Evidence from skulls in east London shows plague had to have been airborne to spread so quickly

Vanessa Thorpe

Saturday 29 March 2014

The Observer

 

http://www.theguardian.com/science/2014/mar/29/black-death-not-spread-rat-fleas-london-plague

 

Archaeologists and forensic scientists who have examined 25 skeletons unearthed in the Clerkenwell area of London a year ago believe they have uncovered the truth about the nature of the Black Death that ravaged Britain and Europe in the mid-14th century.

Analysis of the bodies and of wills registered in London at the time has cast doubt on "facts" that every schoolchild has learned for decades: that the epidemic was caused by a highly contagious strain spread by the fleas on rats.

 

Now evidence taken from the human remains found in Charterhouse Square, to the north of the City of London, during excavations carried out as part of the construction of the Crossrail train line, have suggested a different cause: only an airborne infection could have spread so fast and killed so quickly.

 

The Black Death arrived in Britain from central Asia in the autumn of 1348 and by late spring the following year it had killed six out of every 10 people in London. Such a rate of destruction would kill five million now. By extracting the DNA of the disease bacterium, Yersinia pestis, from the largest teeth in some of the skulls retrieved from the square, the scientists were able to compare the strain of bubonic plague preserved there with that which was recently responsible for killing 60 people in Madagascar. To their surprise, the 14th-century strain, the cause of the most lethal catastrophe in recorded history, was no more virulent than today's disease. The DNA codes were an almost perfect match.

 

According to scientists working at Public Health England in Porton Down, for any plague to spread at such a pace it must have got into the lungs of victims who were malnourished and then been spread by coughs and sneezes. It was therefore a pneumonic plague rather than a bubonic plague. Infection was spread human to human, rather than by rat fleas that bit a sick person and then bit another victim. "As an explanation [rat fleas] for the Black Death in its own right, it simply isn't good enough. It cannot spread fast enough from one household to the next to cause the huge number of cases that we saw during the Black Death epidemics," said Dr Tim Brooks from Porton Down, who will put his theory in a Channel 4 documentary, Secret History: The Return of the Black Death, next Sunday.

 

To support his argument, Brooks has looked at what happened in Suffolk in 1906 when plague killed a family and then spread to a neighbour who had come to help. The culprit was pneumonic plague, which had settled in the lungs of the victims and was spread through infected breath.

 

The skeletons at Charterhouse Square reveal that the population of London was also in generally poor health when the disease struck. Crossrail's archaeology contractor, Don Walker, and Jelena Bekvalacs of the Museum of London found evidence of rickets, anaemia, bad teeth and childhood malnutrition.

 

In support of the case that this was a fast-acting, direct contagion, archaeologist Dr Barney Sloane found that in the medieval City of London all wills had to be registered at the Court of Hustings. These led him to believe that 60% of Londoners were wiped out.

 

Antibiotics can today prevent the disease from becoming pneumonic. In the spring of 1349, the death rate did not ease until Pentecost on 31 May.

 
 
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