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H(app)y 450th Birthday

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 25.191  Thursday, 17 April 2014

 

From:        Hardy M. Cook < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:        Thursday, April 17, 2014

Subject:    H(app)y 450th Birthday

 

The Folger Shakespeare Library

 

H(app)y 450th birthday, Will Shakespeare! 

 

In celebration, The Folger Shakespeare Library is offering the Folger Luminary Shakespeare apps for just $2.99, through April 27. Enjoy Hamlet, Othello, Romeo and Juliet, Macbeth, and A Midsummer Night’s Dreamhttp://ow.ly/vObiZ

 

Folger Luminary Shakespeare Apps

 

Designed to make great plays accessible to all readers in a lively digital format, the Folger Luminary Shakespeare Apps are an interactive reading experience that enriches the Folger Shakespeare Editions—the gold standard in modern edited Shakespeare texts—with

  • Full audio recordings by professional actors produced by Folger Theatre
     
  • Expert commentaries from leading scholars, teachers, and performers
     
  • Illuminating images from the Folger collections and video
     
  • Robust authoring and sharing tools 

From solitary reading to generative thinking, from the classroom to the theater, Folger Luminary Shakespeare apps offer an interactive reading experience to enhance our pleasure and understanding of Shakespeare’s extraordinary works.

 
 
Upcoming Events at Globe Theatre

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 25.190  Thursday, 17 April 2014

 

From:        Hardy M. Cook < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         Thursday, April 17, 2014

Subject:     Upcoming Events at Globe Theatre

 

Globe Theatre Shakespeare’s Birthday Celebration: 21 April

Free Family Open Day

Monday 21 April

12 noon – 5.00pm (last admission 4.30pm)

 

To celebrate Shakespeare’s 450th birthday we invite you to join our free family open day, packed with fun activities, performances and special ticket offers.

 

Shakespeare’s Birthday is a great way to introduce children to the Globe and Shakespeare, or simply to visit us in party mode.

 

Following the theme of a traditional birthday party activities throughout the day include: a bouncy castle, face painting, Pin the Ruff on the Bard, cake decorating, pass the parcel, stilt performers, balloon animals, Punch and Judy shows and more. This is also an opportunity to visit the biggest exhibition dedicated to Shakespeare’s London, for free. (Normal adult price £13.50)

 

The event culminates with performances on the stage. We welcome back improvisational geniuses School of Night where “everything is created on the spur of the moment according to ideas and suggestions proffered by the audience.” There will also be scenes from Shakespeare performed and traditional balloon modellers. Is it your birthday on 21 April? Let us know and you might end up on the stage too.

 

Special Birthday Offer


From 21-27 April all yard (standing) tickets for performances throughout April will be available for a reduced price of 450 pence (normal price £5).  This celebratory offer is available in person or over the telephone. Please quote ‘Birthday offer’ (subject to availability).

Box Office : 0207 401 9919

 

 

Shakespeare at 450

Our first season in the Sam Wanamaker Playhouse celebrates the 450th anniversary of Shakespeare’s birth.

 

The season opens with a stunning candlelit production of John Lyly’s witty and beautiful Galatea presented by the Edwards’ Boys from Shakespeare’s own grammar school.

 

Some of the world’s leading Shakespeare scholars tell us what the anniversary means to them in a series of exclusive Shakespeare at 450 Lectures, including this year’s Sam Wanamaker Fellow Jonathon Bate and previous Fellows Stanley Wells, Tiffany Stern, James Shapiro, Lisa Jardine, Andrew Gurr and Farah Karim-Cooper.

 

Read Not Dead celebrates its move into the Playhouse with an exceptional season including Jonson’s Every Man in His Humour in which Shakespeare originally acted, and the chance for you to choose the last reading of the season in a special public voting event.

 

David and Ben Crystal join us with a series of ground-breaking events in the Playhouse Exploring Original Pronunciation. Plus experience Macbeth as Shakespeare might have heard it in an extra special Read Not Dead coordinated by David and Ben Crystal, presented in original pronunciation and by candlelight.

 

This summer’s Study Days will satisfy the keenest of minds. Children and families can get involved in Story Days, and the sell-out Muse of Fire returns later this summer – with a twist in its tale.

 

Pre- and Post-show events illuminate the Globe Theatre season whilst the brand new Research in Action explores the Sam Wanamaker Playhouse inside and out with leading scholars and Globe Theatre artists: audience participation will be encouraged! 

 

 

Globe to Globe Hamlet will be the first production of the season, taking to the Globe stage on 23 April before beginning its two-year world tour. 

 

Opening on 24 April, Lucy Bailey’s hotly anticipated Titus Andronicus promises to utterly transform the Globe theatre. 

 

To celebrate Shakespeare's birthday we're visiting EVERY country in the world! Please back our project and be part of our journey.

 

The tour

On 23 April 2014 the Globe opens its most ambitious tour yet: a two-year tour of Hamlet that will visit every single country on earth. Sixteen extraordinary men and women will travel by boat, train, 4X4, tall ship, bus and aeroplane across the seven continents, performing in a huge range of unique and atmospheric venues – from village squares to national theatres, from palaces to beaches. 

 

The production is a fresh, pared-down version of Shakespeare’s classic tragedy of deferred revenge. The company of twelve actors and four stage managers will use a completely portable set to stage a Hamlet that celebrates all the exuberance and invention of Shakespeare’s language in a brisk two hours and forty minutes. The production will be directed by Dominic Dromgoole and Bill Buckhurst, designed by Jonathan Fensom and composed by Bill Barclay. Additional original music by Laura Forrest-Hay.

 

The role of Hamlet will be shared by Ladi Emeruwa and Naeem Hayat. All other male and female parts will be played in rotation by Keith Bartlett, John Dougall, Miranda Foster, Phoebe Fildes, Beruce Khan, Tom Lawrence, Jennifer Leong, Rawiri Paratene, Matthew Romain and Amanda Wilkin.

 

 

Titus Andronicus 

24 April - 13 July

 

Returning to Rome from a war against the Goths, the general Titus Andronicus brings with him the queen Tamora and her three sons as prisoners of war. Titus’ sacrifice of Tamora’s eldest son to appease the ghosts of his dead sons, and his decision to refuse to accept the title of emperor, initiates a terrible cycle of mutilation, rape and murder. And all _the while, at the centre of the nightmare, there moves the villainous, self-delighting Aaron.

 

Grotesquely violent and daringly experimental, Titus was the smash hit of Shakespeare’s early career, and is written with a ghoulish energy he was never to repeat elsewhere.

 

This production revisits Lucy Bailey’s spectacular Globe production of 2006

 
 
The Sonnets

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 25.189  Wednesday, 16 April 2014

 

[1] From:        Anthony Burton < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

     Date:         April 15, 2014 at 7:09:59 PM EDT

     Subject:    Re: SHAKSPER: Sonnets 

 

[2] From:        Ian Steere < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

     Date:         April 16, 2014 at 6:02:07 AM EDT

     Subject:    The Sonnets 

 

 

[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------

From:        Anthony Burton < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         April 15, 2014 at 7:09:59 PM EDT

Subject:    Re: SHAKSPER: Sonnets

 

My misquotation of Gabriel Harvey was a blunder, to which I own up and apologize. I would however have said the same things and to the very same effect had I correctly cited his reference as being to Venus and Adonis rather than Romeo and Juliet.

 

I thank Mr. Downs for the correction, reaffirm my call for greater open-mindedness and civility on this website, and renounce any desire or hope to exceed his performance in, as he says, submitting the worst posts to it.  

 

Tony Burton

 

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------

From:        Ian Steere < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         April 16, 2014 at 6:02:07 AM EDT

Subject:    The Sonnets

 

I appreciate the elaboration of John Drakakis (as to why he will refuse to countenance the prospect of autobiography in the Sonnets).

 

I accept that all art involves the imagination of the artist - leading to elements of fiction in the art. I also accept that most, if not all, art includes elements of reality. The proportion of fiction to non-fiction is, I suggest, infinitely variable within extremes. In the absence of the artist’s confirmation, we either remain in the dark as to this proportion or we are able to draw reasonable conclusions from other evidence.

 

By contrast, it seems to me that John’s position may be summarized thus: all poetry must be regarded wholly as fiction, because we should reject any inference of non-fiction which carries less than a 100% probability of truth. Consequently, it is pointless to address any evidence for the probability of biography in the Sonnets.

 

By extension - though he, of course, did not say this - we should not try to seek explanations for anything (since all our perceptions of truth are subject to some degree of uncertainty, be it ever so small). On this basis, John will also reject any inference of the high probabilities that William Shakspere attended the local grammar school in Stratford and that he subsequently wrote most of the works credited to Shakespeare. 

 

If he wishes to dispel these impressions, all he need do is address the evidence and the probabilities summarized and pointed to in this thread. If not, I wish him well and thank him for the insights which he has provided.

 
 
Shakespeare @LibertasU

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 25.188  Wednesday, 16 April 2014

 

From:        Robert Appelbaum < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         April 15, 2014 at 8:31:19 PM EDT

Subject:    RE: SHAKSPER: Online Course

 

Re: Why is Shakespeare the greatest dramatist?

 

It seems to me that questions of this sort are pseudo-questions. If you don’t know the answer yet, surely in a moment you will.

 

It seems to me too that the idea of ‘great men’ is gratuitous. I do not doubt that Shakespeare believed in the Great Man theory of history, but why should we? Maybe we should find ourselves well beyond that idea . . . 

 

And in any case ‘University of Dallas’ sends up a warning signal. In a city of guns, abortion restrictions, and cowboy hats, the idea that Shakespeare confronts his great men (why not his great women, or his terrible men like Shylock) with ‘fateful choices’ seems more like a licence to dominance than an explanation of what continues to appeal to us in Shakespeare.

 

Robert Appelbaum

Professor of English Literature

Engelska Institutionen

Uppsala Universitet

 
 
The Sonnets

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 25.187  Tuesday, 15 April 2014

 

[1] From:        John Drakakis < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

     Date:         April 10, 2014 at 5:18:23 PM EDT

     Subject:    RE: SHAKSPER: Sonnets 

 

[2] From:        Gerald E. Downs < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

     Date:         April 13, 2014 at 1:59:36 PM EDT

     Subject:    Gabriel Harvey 

 

 

[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------

From:        John Drakakis < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         April 10, 2014 at 5:18:23 PM EDT

Subject:    RE: SHAKSPER: Sonnets

 

Ian Steere’s courtesy requires an equally courteous response.

 

I accept that the customary way of treating Shakespeare’s sonnets is to assume that when a poet is writing poetry then s/he is writing autobiographically. This, I am sorry to say is a romantic fiction, and derives from Wordsworth’s ‘emotion recollected in tranquility’. Keats’ suggestion that Shakespeare’s writing confirmed a ‘negative capability’ i.e. a capacity to enter imaginatively and vicariously into a wide range of experience. After all, is this what we teach our students: that they can access experience vicariously through reading literature? The Sonnets ‘imagine’ a series of scenarios that are in effect variations on the genre. If we seek an autobiographical strand then we must assert that Shakespeare could not write about an experience that he had not already had. Biographers plunder the writing in search of this ‘original’ experience, and in the process produce fictions, OR, more disturbingly, reveal aspects of their own autobiographies. The process is very complicated and requires us to ask some searching questions about the assumptions and the discourse of biography. This will extend to a revaluation of what have been considered as ‘facts’.  It is because we know so little of the things that we (from a post-Freudian standpoint) would like to know about Shakespeare that we tend to neglect the radical ‘differences’ between life in the late 16th century and our own. 

 

I have no desire to prevent anybody from creating whatever plausible fictions they may wish to concerning Shakespeare’s life. We create these fictions because the life contains a number of glaring contradictions that no attempt at producing a coherent narrative will resolve. It is why we continue to create the narratives, and to invent origins that are beyond verification.

 

Cheers

John Drakakis 

 

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------

From:        Gerald E. Downs < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         April 13, 2014 at 1:59:36 PM EDT

Subject:    Gabriel Harvey

 

Anthony Burton observed:

 

> The recent exchanges over meaning in Sonnet 144

> bring tears to my eyes, as the worst possible use of

> SHAKSPER as a vehicle for wider and better

> understanding of the Bard. Way back when,

> Gabriel Harvey noted that Romeo and Juliet delight

> the younger sort and Hamlet has much in it to please

> the wiser sort.

 

And here I thought my posts were the worst; yet matters of opinion are harmless at worst. Facts are something else. My Wayback Machine says Harvey associated the younger sort with Venus and Adonis, not Romeo and Juliet.

 

Gerald E. Downs

 

 
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