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Book Announcement: Juliet's Nurse: Talk/Book Announcement

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 25.449  Monday, 24 November 2014

 

From:        Lois Leveen < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         October 18, 2014 at 10:07:00 PM EDT

Subject:    Book Announcement: Juliet's Nurse:  Talk/Book Announcement

 

Dear colleagues,

 

I’m delighted to announce that Juliet’s Nurse has just been published by Simon & Schuster in the US, UK, and Australia, and by Random House in Canada.  The novel begins14 years before the events in Romeo and Juliet, and, as the title suggests, it is told from the point-of-view of Shakespeare’s memorably comic/tragic Angelica.  With the 3rd largest number of lines in the play, she was clearly always wanting to tell her own story.

 

The Centre for Medieval Studies at the University of Toronto is hosting a talk this Friday, October 24 at 2pm in which I will discuss the academic research that is woven into the novel, particularly focusing on how I use fiction to present information about premodern maternal and religious desire for audiences beyond academia.  If you have ever wondered about creative ways to share scholarship with broader audiences, this talk (a reprise of one I delivered in at the Medievalist Congress in Kalamazoo) is for you.  I would be happy to deliver it at other campuses or events, or to give talks about other aspects of revising Shakespeare for modern readers—please feel free to contact me off list about hosting future events.  Details about the U of T event, which is free and open to the public, are available here:  http://medieval.utoronto.ca/2014/10/juliets-nurse-talk-by-lois-leveen/  (yes, the Canadian cover image is completely anachronistic; the US/UK cover is slightly better but only slightly . . . I assure you, the novel, like the play, is set in the 14th century)

 

There is also a very wonderful teaching guide for pairing Juliet’s Nurse with Romeo and Juliet, created by Pam Cole of Kennesaw State University.  The guide includes sections focusing on literary concepts such as genre, point-of-view, irony, etc. and also on interdisciplinary approaches drawing on history, science, fine arts, etc.  It’s adaptable for use at both the high school and undergraduate levels and can be downloaded for free at http://loisleveen.com/index.php/loisleveen/juliets-nurse-for-teachers  

 

Thanks to SHAKSPER colleagues who helped in research along the way.

 

Best regards,

Lois Leveen

Portland, Oregon

 
 
Book Announcement: Shakespeare and the Ethics of Appropriation

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 25.448  Monday, 24 November 2014

 

From:        Alexa Huang < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         November 22, 2014 at 9:17:20 AM EST

Subject:    Book Announcement: Shakespeare and the Ethics of Appropriation

 

Book Announcement: Shakespeare and the Ethics of Appropriation 

 

Edited by Alexa Huang and Elizabeth Rivlin

Palgrave Macmillan, 2014

 

At a time when Shakespeare is becoming increasingly globalized and diversified it is urgent more than ever to ask how this appropriated ‘Shakespeare’ constructs ethical value across cultural and other fault lines.

 

Available in e-book (PDF) and hardback formats

 

http://www.palgrave.com/page/detail/shakespeare-and-the-ethics-of-appropriation-alexa-huang/?K=9781137375766

 

Table of Contents

 

http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/toc/1137375760/ref=dp_toc/278-1375004-4746421?ie=UTF8&n=266239

 

Introduction; Alexa Huang and Elizabeth Rivlin

 

1. Shakespearean Rhizomatics: Adaptation, Ethics, Value; Doug Lanier

2. Recognizing Shakespeare, Rethinking Fidelity: A Rhetoric and Ethics of Appropriation; Christy Desmet 

3. Ethics and the Undead: Reading Shakespearean (Mis)appropriation in Francis Ford Coppola's Dracula; Adrian Streete

4. Adaptation Revoked: Knowledge, Ethics, and Trauma in Jane Smiley's A Thousand Acres; Elizabeth Rivlin

5. Double Jeopardy: Shakespeare and Prison Theater; Courtney Lehmann

6. Theatre Director as Unelected Representative: Sulayman Al-Bassam's Arab Shakespeare Trilogy; Margaret Litvin

7. A "whirl of aesthetic terminology": Swinburne, Shakespeare, and Ethical Criticism; Robert Sawyer

8. "Raw-Savage" Othello: The First Staged Japanese Adaptation of Othello (1903) and Japanese Colonialism; Yukari Yoshihara

9. The Bard in Bollywood: The Fraternal Nation and Shakespearean Adaptation in Hindi Cinema; Gitanjali Shahani and Brinda Charry

10. Multilingual Ethics in Henry V and Henry VIII; Ema Vyroubalová

11. In Other Words: Global Shakespearean Transformations; Sheila T. Cavanagh

 

Afterword: "State of Exception": Forgetting Hamlet; Thomas Cartelli

 

Appendix: For the Record: Interview with Sulayman Al-Bassam; Margaret Litvin 

 
 
Book Announcement: Marina Tarlinskaja, Shakespeare and the Versification of English Drama, 1561–1642

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 25.447  Monday, 24 November 2014

 

From:        Marina Tarlinskaya < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         October 19, 2014 at 3:18:09 PM EDT

Subject:    Book Announcement: Marina Tarlinskaja, Shakespeare and the Versification of English Drama, 1561–1642

 

Book Announcement: Marina Tarlinskaja, Shakespeare and the Versification of English Drama, 1561–1642

 

H50% discount – use code 50ALA14N when ordering Shakespeare and the Versification of English Drama, 1561–1642 Marina Tarlinskaja, University of Washington, USA

 

‘Tarlinskaja has long been recognized as the world’s authority on Shakespeare’s versification. Providing a thorough history of iambic pentameter in and around the commercial theaters of early modern England, her book illuminates Shakespeare’s achievement by locating him within the rhythmic environments of his day. The breadth and depth of this book are remarkable: from the sixteenth century through the closing of the theaters, all of the major playwrights come in for examination; statistical figures for their works are assembled in a central table. The result is likely to help revive the study of Shakespeare’s versification even as it adds to our understanding of how, and when, his contemporaries wrote their plays.’

 

Douglas Bruster, University of Texas at Austin, USA

 
 
Early Theatre 17.2 (2014) Forthcoming in December in Print and Online

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 25.446  Monday, 24 November 2014

 

From:         Helen M Ostovich < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:          November 14, 2014 at 11:33:54 PM EST

Subject:     Early Theatre 17.2 (2014) 

 

Early Theatre 17.2 (2014) Forthcoming in December in Print and Online

 

Dear Colleagues,

 

The latest issue of Early Theatre will be released in December 2014.  Our new website is <http://earlytheatre.org/>, with only the most recent two years’ subscription behind a moving wall.  The other volumes, from 1 (1998) to 15 (2012) are freely searchable and available for downloads online in pdf format. 

 

Current issue:

Editorial  (by the editors)

Epitaph:  Lawrence Clopper (by Alexandra Johnston)

 

ARTICLES

 

Hocus Pocus and the Croxton Play of the Sacrament

 (by Cameron Hunt Macnabb)

 

'To all kinde of estates I meane for to trudge': Making room for commoners in Cambises

(by Maya Mathur)

 

The Appearance of Blacks on the Early Modern Stage: Love's Labour's Lost's African Connections to Court

(by Matthieu Chapman)

 

Inferior Readings: The Transmigration of 'material' in Tamburlaine the Great

(by Mathew Martin)

 

Ben Jonson's Eloquent Nonsense: the Ordeal of Heard Meanings on the Early Modern Stage (1609-1614)

(by Hristomir A. Stanev)

 

ISSUES IN REVIEW

New Approaches to Thomas Heywood

Contributing Editor:  Grace Ioppolo

 

Introduction:  Entire Hands and Main Fingers

(by Grace Ioppolo)

Thomas Heywood: Just in time

(by Grace Ioppolo)

'Stolne and surreptitious': Heywood as a Test Case

(by William Proctor Williams)

Playhouse Shadows: the Manuscript Behind Dick of Devonshire

(by William B. Long)

 

Best wishes,

Dr H M Ostovich  < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

http://www.humanities.mcmaster.ca/~english/Faculty/Ostovich.html

Founding Editor, Early Theatre <http://earlytheatre.org/>

Professor Emeritus, English and Cultural Studies

McMaster University

 
 
Launching Early Modern London Theatres, V. 2

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 25.445  Monday, 24 November 2014

 

From:        Sally-Beth MacLean < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         November 23, 2014 at 4:40:29 PM EST

Subject:    Launching Early Modern London Theatres 

 

Launching Early Modern London Theatres, V. 2

 

I am delighted to report the launch this week of the second phase of Early Modern London Theatres, with extensive new data relating to several entertainment centres south of the Thames: the Hope, Newington Butts, the Swan and the bearbaiting arenas (www.emlot.kcl.ac.uk/‎). Next to come will be the Rose which we turn to next.

 

We owe special thanks to lead EMLoT bibliographer, Tanya Hagen, whose scholarship and dedication to the project have been key to our progress. She has been ably assisted by an outstanding graduate student in the Dept of English, John Estabillo, who is now associate editor for phase 2.

 

The funding for their work has come from grants from the SSHRC and The British Academy, for which we remain deeply grateful.

 

Sally-Beth MacLean

REED Director of Research/General Editor

 
 
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