Announcements

Shakespearean Festivities in Historic Santa Fe

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 28.075  Thursday, 14 February 2017

 

From:        John F. Andrews <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         February 15, 2017 at 1:00:04 PM EST

Subject:    Shakespearean Festivities in Historic Santa Fe

 

Shakespeare at San Miguel

 

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 24; 7:30 PM

401 OLD SANTA FE TRAIL; $20

 

An Evening of Music and Poetry by

Shakespeare and his Contemporaries, 

Performed on Period Instruments in a  

Chapel from the Poet's Own Lifetime

 

PRESENTED BY SEVERALL FRIENDS,

A GIFTED EARLY MUSIC ENSEMBLE,

AND THE SHAKESPEARE GUILD

 

We’re pleased to invite you to a concert that will take place in a church that dates back to the time when readers in London were enjoying a newly-published collection of Shakespeare’s Sonnets. Our program will feature four remarkable performers. MARY SPRINGFELS, who heads SEVERALL FRIENDS and has been a mainstay with both the FOLGER CONSORT and the NEWBERRY LIBRARY CONSORT, will play viola da gamba. She’ll be joined by countertenor RYLAND ANGEL, stage and screen actor KENT KIRKPATRICK, and lutenist MARK RIMPLE. They’ve all garnered national recognition, and they’ll transport us back to an era when America’s oldest capital city was being established and when England was experiencing a golden age in poetry, drama, and music. 

 

For more detail, see www.shakesguild.org/This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

 

 

NEH Seminar on King Lear: Deadlne

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 28.071  Tuesday, 14 February 2017

 

From:        Richard A. Strier <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         February 14, 2017 at 12:29:53 PM EST

Subject:    NEH Seminar on King Lear: Deadlne

 

March 1 is the deadline for applying to the NEH Seminar for College Teachers on King Lear this summer (July 10-28) directed by Richard Strier at the University of Chicago.  For application instructions and detailed information, see the website:  https://lucian.uchicago.edu/blogs/neh2017lear/

 

BRIEF DESCRIPTION:  This seminar will attempt to see the play through many lenses:  in formal terms; in its historical contexts; and in its life beyond Shakespeare’s time.  The seminar will first be devoted to coming to terms with the material existence of the play, the two early texts of it.  We will then read the sources for the play and look into some of its afterlife.  We will read the version of the play by Nahum Tate (1681) and then jump to the last third of the 20th century and discuss two film versions of the play.  We will next dive into criticism and scholarship: “Old” and “New” historicism (on religion); criticism that deals with social and political issues; “character” and psychoanalytic criticism; “New Critical” approaches; and current trends in literary criticism.  The aim of the seminar is not to answer the textual, historical, and critical questions that it raises, but to show how compelling these questions are.  Tenured, tenure-track, and full-time NON-tenure track instructors are welcome to apply. 

 

 

 

CFP Two Notices

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 28.070  Tuesday, 14 February 2017

 

From:        Robert Appelbaum <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         February 14, 2017 at 9:09:38 AM EST

Subject:    CFP Two Notices

 

Dear All,

 

I am seeking to form a panel on Shakespeare and Inequality for my forthcoming conference: ‘Is economic inequality also a literary problem?’

 

The website is here: https://reg.akademikonferens.se/app/netattm/attendee/page/55799 

 

Also, as editor in charge of English Literature for Studia Neophilologica, I am keen to receive submissions on any topic in pre-modern English literature.  Our home page with submission guidelines can be found here: http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/snec20 

 

Happy Valentine’s Day!

 

Robert

 

Robert Appelbaum

Professor of English Literature

English Department

Uppsala University

http://www.engelska.uu.se/People/Appelbaum/

 

 

 

Kingston Shakespeare: Shakespearean Anachronism

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 28.067  Monday, 13 February 2017

 

From:        Timo Uotinen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         February 11, 2017 at 6:16:56 PM EST

Subject:    Kingston Shakespeare: Shakespearean Anachronism

 

SHAKESPEAREAN ANACHRONISM

Saturday February 18, 2017

Rose Theatre, Kingston-upon-Thames

 

 

10.15 Welcome: Ildiko Solti

 

10.30 Plenary: Dr Erik Roraback (Charles University):
‘An Anachronistic Figure of Redemption: Modernity, Rhetoric, and Self-Identity of Shakespeare’s King Richard II

 

11.30: Coffee break

 

12.00: Stefanie Bauerochse: ‘“400 Jahre sterben. (d)over. // norway.today”: Directing as Research in Performance’

 

12.30: Dr Jessica Chiba (Royal Holloway):‘Shakespearean Prophecy’

 

13.00: Sara Reimers (Royal Holloway):
‘“In time I may believe”: Gender politics, Anachronism, and Genre in contemporary stagings of The Taming of the Shrew

 

13.30: Lunch break

 

14.30: Prof Margaret Jones Davies (Sorbonne):
‘”0ne two three: time, time”: Anachronism in Cymbeline

 

15.00: Prof Per Sivefors (Linnæus University):
‘Anachronism as Aesthetic Device in Elizabethan Satire’

 

15.30: Prof Ken Pickering (Kent) and Dr Ildiko Solti (Kingston):
‘Stepping in the same river twice?:
Reproduction Elizabethan Playhouses: Gdansk and Staunton’

 

16:00: Pepe Pryke: ‘The Rose Bankside Today’

 

16.30: Tea break

 

17.00 Plenary: Professor Tiffany Stern (Royal Holloway):
‘Performing at the Globe – in Shakespeare’s Time and Our Own’

 

18.00 – 18.30

Stefanie Bauerochse: V&A IX: 

 

The whole day takes place in the Gallery of the Rose Theatre. No reservation required.

 

The conference is free and open to everyone!

 

Facebook event page
shakespearean-anachronism-programme-final

 

The Spring (and Summer) term has a lot of activity in store: continued playreadings, work-in-progress presentations, book talks, conferences and symposia at Garrick’s Temple.

 

Here is the schedule as it currently stands:

All events take place at 18.30 in the Gallery of the Rose Theatre, Kingston, unless otherwise stated.

 

Also see the webpages (www.kingstonshakespeareseminar.wordpress.com) for latest information on events!

 

Timo Uotinen

PhD Candidate in English Literature

Royal Holloway, University of London

http://tinyurl.com/otqu2g5

http://royalholloway.academia.edu/TimoUotinen

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. / This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

 

 

Gielgud Letter on Romeo Offered at Auction

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 28.066  Monday, 13 February 2017

 

From:        Harry Keyishian <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         February 11, 2017 at 2:19:20 PM EST

Subject:    Gielgud Letter on Romeo Offered at Auction

 

Being offered for auction by Bonhams in New York on March 9th, as part of a Fine Books & Manuscripts sale, Lot #163, is a letter from John Gielgud to actor and author Richard Sterne, offering extended and insightful advice on playing Romeo. It was written in the 1960s while Sterne was in rehearsal to play Romeo at the Oregon Shakespeare Festival. Sterne is at present sponsoring a monthly play reading series at Saint Luke’s Church in the Theater District in New York.

 

Harry Keyishian 

Director, Fairleigh Dickinson University Press

Professor Emeritus, Department of Literature, Language, Writing, and Philosophy 

Fairleigh Dickinson University

 

 

 

NEH SEMINAR ON KING LEAR

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 28.062  Friday, 10 February 2017

 

From:        Richard A. Strier <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         February 9, 2017 at 5:41:26 PM EST

Subject:    NEH SEMINAR ON KING LEAR

 

March 1 is the deadline for applying to the NEH Seminar for College Teachers on King Lear this summer (July 10-28) directed by Richard Strier at the University of Chicago.  For application instructions and detailed information, see the website:  https://lucian.uchicago.edu/blogs/neh2017lear/

 

BRIEF DESCRIPTION:  This seminar will attempt to see the play through many lenses: in formal terms; in its historical contexts; and in its life beyond Shakespeare’s time.  The seminar will first be devoted to coming to terms with the material existence of the play, the two early texts of it.  We will then read the sources for the play and look into some of its afterlife.  We will read the version of the play by Nahum Tate (1681) and then jump to the last third of the 20th century and discuss two film versions of the play.  We will next dive into criticism and scholarship: “Old” and “New” historicism (on religion); criticism that deals with social and political issues; “character” and psychoanalytic criticism; “New Critical” approaches; and current trends in literary criticism.  The aim of the seminar is not to answer the textual, historical, and critical questions that it raises, but to show how compelling these questions are.  Tenured, tenure-track, and full-time NON-tenure track instructors are welcome to apply. 

 

 

 

Lexicons of Early Modern English (LEME)

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 28.044  Friday, 3 February 2017

 

From:        UTP Journals <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         February 2, 2017 at 1:55:43 PM EST

Subject:    Lexicons of Early Modern English (LEME)

 

Lexicons of Early Modern English now open access!

 

Lexicons of Early Modern English (LEME) is the robust research tool valued greatly by lexical historians and researchers around the world. 

 

LEME has been setting the standard for modern linguistic research on the English language since 1990 by providing researchers unprecedented access to early books and manuscripts documenting the growth and development of the English language. LEME is ever expanding and currently includes more than 808, 963 word-entries from 213 monolingual, bilingual, and polyglot dictionaries, lexical encyclopedias, hard-word glossaries, spelling lists, and lexically-valuable treatises surviving in print or manuscript from the Tudor, Stuart, Caroline, Commonwealth, and Restoration periods.

 

To this date, LEME has been available in two versions – an open access version that allows for simple searches on the multilingual lexical database and a subscription based version, that provides a robust and full-featured scholarly resource for advanced research into the entire lexical content of Early Modern English.

 

In an effort to make this valuable research tool available to all researchers, everywhere, the LEME Project team, University of Toronto Press and the University of Toronto Libraries are pleased to announce that as of January 30, 2017, Lexicons of Early Modern English, and all of its functionality, will be full open access.

 

For more information and to access the full version of Lexicons of Early Modern English (open access as of January 30, 2017) at http://leme.library.utoronto.ca

 

 

 

 

Global Chaucer and Shakespeare, GWU, February 4

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 28.030  Wednesday, 1 February 2017

 

From:        Alexa Huang <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         February 1, 2017 at 12:05:10 AM EST

Subject:    Global Chaucer and Shakespeare, GWU, February 4

 

Global Chaucer and Shakespeare in a Digital World

 

Saturday, 4 February 2017

10:00 am – 5:30 pm

 

National Churchill Library and Center

Gelman Library, First Floor

The George Washington University

2130 H Street NW, Washington, DC 20052

 

https://gwdhi.org/conferences/

 

Please register for free online: 

 

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/global-chaucer-and-shakespeare-in-the-digital-world-tickets-31358443950

 

Chaucer and Shakespeare, the global literary icons, play a major role in the digital world. This cross-disciplinary symposium puts the legacies of Chaucer and Shakespeare in conversation with each other. Speakers will explore the intersections and connections between the afterlives of Chaucer and Shakespeare in world cultures.

 

Featured Speaker: José Francisco Botelho, award-winning translator and poet (Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil)

 

Other participants: Candace Barrington (Central Connecticut State), Jill Bradbury (Gallaudet), Laura Estill (Texas A&M), Alexa Huang (George Washington), Jonathan Hsy (George Washington), Carol Robinson (Kent State at Trumball), Michael Saenger (Southwestern), Mike Shea (Southern Connecticut State), Mercedes de la Torre and Carlos Drocchi (Fundación Shakespeare Argentina), Eve Salisbury (Western Michigan), Sam Yates (George Washington), Katherine Schaap Williams (NYU Abu Dhabi)

 

With an intermission show “Snape vs Branagh” by Michael Saenger

Organized and sponsored by the GW Digital Humanities Institute

 

 

 

NEH Summer Seminar for College Teachers "The Formation and Re-formation of the Book: 1450-1650"

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 28.029  Wednesday, 1 February 2017

 

From:        Mark C Rankin <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:        January 30, 2017 at 4:19:41 PM EST

Subject:   NEH Summer Seminar for College Teachers "The Formation and Re-formation of the Book: 1450-1650"

 

Dear colleagues,

 

Applications are welcome to participate in the following NEH Summer Seminar, which will convene at the Huntington. 

 

Best, 

Mark Rankin

 

*******************************

 

John N. King of The Ohio State University and Mark Rankin of James Madison University will direct a National Endowment for the Humanities Summer Seminar for College and University Teachers on continuity and change in the production, dissemination, and reading of Western European books during the 200 years following the advent of printing with movable type. In particular, they plan to pose the governing question of whether the advent of printing was a necessary precondition for the Protestant Reformation. Participants will consider ways in which adherents of different religious faiths shared common ground in exploiting elements such as book layout, typography, illustration, and paratext (e.g., prefaces, glosses, and commentaries) in order to inspire reading, but also to restrict interpretation. Employing key methods of the History of the Book, our investigation will consider how the physical nature of books affected ways in which readers understood and assimilated their intellectual contents. This program is geared to meet the needs of teacher-scholars interested in the literary, political, or cultural history of the Renaissance and/or Reformation, the History of the Book, art history, women’s studies, religious studies, bibliography, print culture, library science (including rare book librarians), mass communication, literacy studies, and more.

 

This seminar will meet from 18 June until 15 July 2017 at The Huntington Library in San Marino, CA, one of the nation’s leading research and cultural centers. Among the Library’s 420,000 rare books and seven million manuscripts are major holdings in medieval manuscripts, books printed before 1501, Renaissance history and literature, maps, travel literature, and the history of science, medicine, and technology. The Huntington also boasts art galleries containing 650 paintings and 440 works of sculpture, as well as twelve botanical gardens containing 15,000 plant varieties. 

 

Those eligible to apply include citizens of USA who are engaged in teaching at the college or university level and independent scholars who have received the terminal degree in their field (usually the Ph.D.). In addition, non-US citizens who have taught and lived in the USA for at least three years prior to March 2017 are eligible to apply. NEH will provide participants with a stipend of $3,300. Up to three spaces will be reserved for adjunct faculty.

 

Full details and application information are available at http://sites.jmu.edu/NEHformation-reformation-books2017/. For further information, please contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. The deadline for application is March 1, 2017.

 

 

 

CFP Reminder: Offensive Shakespeare Conference, Northumbria University, UK, 24 May 2017

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 28.028  Wednesday, 1 February 2017

 

From:        Edmund King <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:        January 26, 2017 at 10:41:32 AM EST

Subject:    CFP Reminder: Offensive Shakespeare Conference, Northumbria University, UK, 24 May 2017

 

Dear all,

 

The deadline for abstracts for the forthcoming “Offensive Shakespeare” conference, to take place at Northumbria University, Newcastle Upon Tyne, on 24 May 2017, is fast approaching! 200-word abstracts (for 20-minute papers) can be sent to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. The deadline for abstracts is: 15 February 2017.

 

Offensive Shakespeare

 

Keynote speakers: Prof. Douglas Lanier (University of New Hampshire)

                                 Dr. Peter Kirwan (Nottingham University)

 

‘Outrage as BBC bosses “use Shakespeare to push pro-immigration agenda”’. This was a headline in The Daily Express on 25th April 2016, after the BBC included what has become known as the ‘Immigration Speech’ from Sir Thomas More in a programme celebrating the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare’s death. From Thomas and Henrietta Bowdler expurgating passages from their Family Shakespeare, through campaigns in the early 20th century to remove The Merchant of Venice from American classrooms, to this recent ‘outrage’, people have been offended by what Shakespeare wrote or by the uses to which others have put him. But what is it that offends us and how do we deal with it? What makes Shakespeare and his appropriations such a sensitive issue? We welcome 200-word abstracts for 20-minute papers that might address the following (or related) topics:

 

  • Case studies of individuals or groups taking offence at Shakespeare’s texts.
  • Examples of Shakespearean rewritings aimed at addressing ‘offensive’ issues. 
  • Shakespearean plays or performances which have been banned, censored, or campaigned against. 
  • Debates around removing Shakespeare from educational curricula, or making the study of his work mandatory. 
  • Appropriations of Shakespeare by anti-democratic or repressive movements (e.g. ‘Nazi Shakespeare’, ‘racist Shakespeare’). 
  • Iconoclastic uses of Shakespeare that ‘offend’ against established orthodoxies. 
  • Adaptations of Shakespeare into popular genres or idioms. 
  • Means of teaching or tackling plays which include morally, ethically, or politically problematic passages (e.g. The Taming of the Shrew, Othello, The Merchant of Venice).
  • Uses of Shakespeare in propaganda, inflammatory speeches, or heated political debates.

Thanks to a generous grant from the BSA, we are able to offer two bursaries of £75 each to assist postgraduate students with the costs of attending the conference. Email the organisers if you would like to apply for one of these.

 

Please submit abstracts to Monika Smialkowska (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.) or Edmund King (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.) by 15 February 2017.    

 

To register, visit https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/about-us/news-events/events/2017/05/offensive-shakespeare-conference/

 

 

 

Announcement -- Upcoming Publication -- Arden Shakespeare and Theory Series

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 28.027  Wednesday, 1 February 2017

 

From:        Evelyn Gajowski <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:        January 25, 2017 at 12:23:42 AM EST

Subject:    Announcement -- Upcoming Publication -- Arden Shakespeare and Theory Series

 

Dear Fellow SHAKSPER Members, 

 

I’m pleased to announce the upcoming publication of the next two titles in the Arden Shakespeare and Theory Series --  http://bloomsbury.com/uk/series/shakespeare-and-theory/ 

 

Parvini, Neema. Shakespeare and New Historicist Theory. Arden Shakespeare and Theory Series. London: Arden Shakespeare/Bloomsbury, 26 Jan. 2017. ISBN 9781474240987 

 

http://bloomsbury.com/uk/shakespeare-and-new-historicist-theory-9781474240987/

 

Laroche, Rebecca, and Jennifer Munroe. Shakespeare and Ecofeminist Theory.  Arden Shakespeare and Theory Series. London: Arden Shakespeare/Bloomsbury, 23 Feb. 2017. ISBN 9781472590459 

 

http://bloomsbury.com/uk/shakespeare-and-ecofeminist-theory-9781472590459/

 

These titles are currently available for pre-order.  If you would order them for your campus library and consider ordering them for your courses, your students, and yourselves, I would be grateful.    

 

All the best,

Evelyn Gajowski, Series Editor

Arden Shakespeare and Theory Series

 

 

 

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