Announcements

Events with Director Richard Eyre and Critic Peter Marks

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 29.0336  Tuesday, 9 October 2018

 

From:        John F. Andrews <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         October 7, 2018 at 10:14:17 PM EDT

Subject:    Events with Director Richard Eyre and Critic Peter Marks

 

Sir Ian McKellen to Present

The 2018 Gielgud Award to

Director Sir Richard Eyre

 

Sunday, October 14, at Noon

UK Theatre Awards Luncheon

Guildhall, City of London

Tickets at www.uktheatre.org

 

We’re delighted to announce that the recipient of our 2018 Gielgud trophy, to be presented in a setting that Shakespeare mentions in Richard III, will be director, producer, filmmaker, and author Sir Richard Eyre. Sir Richard’s riveting television production of King Lear, with Sir Anthony Hopkins in the title role and Emma Thompson as Goneril, debuted recently on Amazon Prime Video. Meanwhile his evocative feature film, The Children Act, co-starring Emma Thompson and Stanley Tucci, and featuring Fionn Whitehead in a filmscript by Ian McEwan, is now gripping audiences in cinemas around the globe. 

 

Bestowing this year’s award will be our inaugural Gielgud laureate, Sir Ian McKellen. When he received the 1996 trophy in a May ceremony at the Folger Shakespeare Library, Sir Ian used the occasion to recite a powerful admonition in The Booke of Sir Thomas Moore and relate it to the words Justice Kennedy had spoken earlier that day when he delivered a historic Supreme Court ruling that “no state may ‘deem a class of persons a stranger to its laws.’ “

 

 

Speaking of Shakespeare

With Critic Peter Marks

Of The Washington Post

 

Wednesday, October 17, at 8 p.m.

The National Arts Club

15 Gramercy Park South, NYC

Free, but Reservations Requested

 

In 2002, after nine years with the New York Times, Peter Marks joined the Washington Post as chief theater critic. In that role he covers everything from pre-Broadway shows at Arena Stage, the National Theatre, and the Kennedy Center to innovative productions at venues such as the Folger Theatre (a home for gifted directors like Aaron Posner), Ford’s Theater (which still attracts our nation’s political leaders to its presentations), the Shakespeare Theatre Company (which Michael Kahn has established as a leading classical venue), and Signature Theatre (which has become renowned for Eric Schaeffer’s sensitive renderings of Sondheim musicals).  

 

Mr. Marks is a nationally-recognized observer whose reviews, commentary, and profiles explore key trends in New York, London, and other significant cultural centers.  

 

For details visit www.shakesguild.org, and click on the blue links. And for inquiries, simply reply to this message with an email to John Andrews at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

 

 

ASC Programming

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 29.0333  Friday, 5 October 2018

 

From:        Sarah Enloe <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         October 4, 2018 at 5:01:54 PM EDT

Subject:    ASC Programming

 

Teachers, Professors, and others with a deep interest in Shakespeare attend Teacher Seminars at the American Shakespeare Center. When you join us for a weekend at the Blackfriars Playhouse, you will discover the joy and accessibility of teaching Shakespeare. Led by our Shakespeare and Performance Teaching Professionals (including Co-Founder and Director of Mission Dr. Ralph Cohen, Director of Education Sarah Enloe, and our team of Education Artists), these hands-on seminars will ignite your passion for Shakespeare’s words, characters, and themes. Our practical approach will send you back to the classroom equipped to make Shakespeare’s 16th-century lessons engaging for your 21st-century students.

 

These play-specific seminars focus on making the language and theatrical elements of Shakespeare relevant and exciting in the classroom. You’ll leave with a toolbox of techniques to remove your students’ “ShakesFear” and replace it with enthusiasm to explore these timeless works.

 

 

ITINERARY

 

Join us for a one-day journey through rhetoric and disguise on the Early Modern stage.

 

 

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 2

 

6:00-7:00pm  Registration and Cocktail Hou

 

7:30pm  As You Like It (included in your registration)

 

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 3

 

8:45-9:45am Welcome and Introductions

 

9:45–10:45am  Connecting the Dots

 

11:00am–12:15pm  Dr Ralph: Finding Falstaff

 

12:15–1:30pm  Lunch Break

 

1:30–2:45pm  Rhetoric: Court and Commons

 

2:45–4:15pm  Put on your Vizards: Disguise in Shakespeare

 

4:30–5:30pm  Debrief and Takeaways

 

7:30pm  Emma (add-on)

 

REGISTER 

 

 

And, next weekend, We host our first ever SHXcademy:

 

FALL BREAK SESSION: ADVANCED LANGUAGE

 

October 11–13, 2018

 

Using ASC’s historical rehearsal conditions, participants will dive into scenes from Shakespeare’s plays to develop characters and create staging moments. You will learn our close reading techniques and employ them in ways that speak to both literary study and understanding of drama.

 

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 11

 

5:00 – 5:30 p.m. – Welcome Reception

 

5:30 – 6:15 p.m. – Inside Plays Workshop

 

7:30 p.m. – Emma

 

10:00 p.m. – Actor Talkback

 

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 12

 

9:00 – 9:30 a.m. – Critics’ Circle

 

9:30 – 10:45 a.m. – Welcome Lecture with Dr. Ralph Alan Cohen

 

11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. – Verse Workshop with Monologue

 

12:30 – 2:00 p.m. – Lunch Break

 

2:00 – 3:30 p.m. – Rhetoric Workshop with Monologue

 

3:45 – 5:15 p.m. – Close Read Workshop with Monologue

 

7:30 p.m. – Richard III

 

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 13

 

9:00 – 9:30 a.m. – Critics’ Circle

 

9:30 – 10:45 a.m. – Monologue Performance

 

11:00 a.m. – 12:15 p.m. – Closing Lecture

 

2:00 p.m. – As You Like It

 

REGISTER  

 

Best,

Sarah Enloe

Director of Education 

American Shakespeare Center

540-466-5869

 

The American Shakespeare Center recovers the joy and accessibility of Shakespeare's theatre, language, and humanity by exploring the English Renaissance stage and its practices through performance and education.

 

<https://www.facebook.com/americanshakespearecenter

<https://instagram.com/americanshakespearecenter/

<http://ascdangerousdreams.tumblr.com/> <https://twitter.com/shakespearectr>

 

 

 

Script-in-Hand Reading in Philadelphia

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 29.0329  Tuesday, 2 October 2018

 

From:        Cary M Mazer <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         September 30, 2018 at 4:30:04 PM EDT

Subject:    Script-in-Hand Reading in Philadelphia

 

Pardon the self-promotion, but if you’re anywhere near Philadelphia on Sunday, October 14, you may be interested in attending a free public script-in-hand reading of my play:

 

A Puppeteer with the Palsy Performs Scenes from Shakespeare,

or,

The Ghost in the Machine

 

Instead of his usual performance of his favorite scenes from Shakespeare, the master puppeteer, along with his troupe of inanimate thespians, shows us why and how he became a puppeteer. Then, for this night only, he puts on a performance unlike any he has given before.

 

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 14, 7PM
Bruce Montgomery Theatre

Annenberg Center
3680 Walnut Street, Philadelphia

Directed by Edward Sobel

Featuring Peter DeLaurier with Sara Outing

 

Support for the workshops and the reading has been provided by The Sachs Program for Arts Innovation 

 

Cary M. Mazer

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

 

 

Shakespeare and his Sources Colloquium

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 29.0328  Friday, 28 September 2018

 

From:        Harry Keyishian <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.> 

Date:         September 27, 2018 at 3:47 PM EDT

Subject:    Shakespeare and his Sources: Colloquium at Fairleigh

                 Dickinson University

 

“Shakespeare and his Sources” will be the subject of the annual Shakespeare Colloquium at Fairleigh Dickinson University on Saturday, October 27, 2018. During the day-long event, four speakers will discuss the ways Shakespeare creatively shaped and transformed his sources to compose his masterpieces. Plays discussed include Hamlet, Macbeth, King Lear, The Winter’s Tale, Richard II, Henry V, and Measure for Measure, as well as the narrative poem, The Rape of Lucrece. Discussion periods will follow each presentation. 

Dr. June Schlueter of Lafayette College will discuss the discovery, with Dennis McCarthy, of a previously unknown Shakespeare source, a discovery reported on the front page of The New York Times in February. Dr. Thomas Fulton (Rutgers University) will speak about the influence of the Bible on Shakespeare’s work. Following a lunch break, Dr. Thomas Olson, who teaches at SUNY New Paltz, will discuss ideas of creativity and originality in Shakespeare’s day, and how a knowledge of sources enriches the study of Shakespeare. Dr. Lauren Silberman of Baruch College-CUNY will examine the sources, traditions, and political impact of The Rape of Lucrece.

 

The colloquium, which is free and open to the public, begins at 9:30 a.m. and ends at 3:30 pm. It will take place in Room S-11 of the Science Building at the Madison, NJ campus of Fairleigh Dickinson University. The lecture hall is handicap accessible. New Jersey teachers may receive five Professional Development hours for participating.

 

This will be the 26th year of these events. Coordinators are Dr. Mathieu Boyd, chair of the Department of Literature, Languages, and Philosophy, and Dr. Harry Keyishian, Professor Emeritus of English. For further information, please write This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

 

BSA - Membership Renewals 2018/19 Update

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 29.0323  Friday, 14 September 2018

 

From:        José A. Pérez Díez 

                 <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         September 14, 2018 at 4:34 AM EDT

Subject:    BSA - Membership Renewals 2018/19 Update

 

Dear Members and Friends,

Our new website, with its new system for handling renewals and accessing content, is almost ready to launch. However, we still need a few days to make sure that it is working correctly. I will email you again at the beginning of next week to give instructions of how to process your membership renewal. Please bear with us while we finish this major upgrade to our web presence and membership system.

The new system will simplify the way members access their membership details, including their membership number, and our exclusive members' area and online journal facilities. You will all have a unique password to log into the website and access a dedicated ‘My account’ profile page on which you will be able to update your contact details and to renew your membership. The greatest change is that we will no longer be using PayPal, and all payments will be processed directly on our website using credit and debit cards. During the process of switching to the new system, myself and our Webmaster will be available to handle any email queries. 

In the meantime, all existing members (2017/18) will still enjoy access to the old website and contents. There is a small backlog of new and renewed memberships that will be processed manually once the new system is in place. I can only apologise again for the inconvenience. This exciting upgrade had become necessary, and I have no doubt that it will be very beneficial for everyone in the BSA.

I also need to let you know that the BSA Board took the decision to offer concessionary rates to our Education Members for this new membership year. Free membership was granted in 2016/17, initially for one year only, to strengthen our relationship with our hugely valuable friends in the primary, secondary, and further education sector. The scheme was extended into 2017/18, but it has now become necessary to charge a small fee for those memberships. We hope the £15 for a renewed individual education membership will be affordable to the vast majority of our education members, and that our teaching materials continue to support their work in our schools and colleges.

Coinciding with the launch of our new Performance and Media Committee in October, the BSA is pleased to announce a new scheme to engage with theatre makers across the UK and beyond: for one year only, we shall be offering free membership of the BSA to theatre practitioners. We will circulate more information about this exciting new initiative over the next few weeks.

All very best wishes, 

Dr. José A. Pérez Díez 
Membership Officer for the British Shakespeare Association 

Shakespearean Attractions at The Players and the National Arts Club

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 29.0321  Wednesday, 12 September 2018

 

From:        John F. Andrews <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         September 12, 2018 at 12:19:03 PM EDT

Subject:    Shakespearean Attractions at The Players and the National Arts Club

 

Shakespeare Uncovered,

With F. Murray Abraham

And Other Luminaries

 

Monday, September 17, at 7 p.m. 

The Players: Edwin Booth's Club 

16 Gramercy Park South, NYC 

Free, but Reservations Requested

 

We’re pleased to launch our 2018-19 Speaking of Shakespeare series with a preview of the third and final season of Shakespeare Uncovered, a PBS collaboration with Shakespeare’s Globe that will treat audiences to one-hour programs about six of the playwright’s most resonant works: Julius CaesarMeasure for MeasureThe Merchant of VeniceMuch Ado About NothingRichard III, and The Winter’s Tale

    

Co-hosted by WNET vice-president Stephen Segaller, and featuring remarks from British filmmakers Richard Denton and Nikki Stockley, Folger director Michael Witmore, and other notables, this gathering will be highlighted by Oscar laureate F. Murray Abraham, who’ll revisit a portrayal of Shylock that has mesmerized audiences on both sides of the Atlantic.    

 

The Lives of Shakespeare,

A Stage Reading of a Trilogy

By Mary Jane Schaefer

 

Tuesday-Thursday, September 25-27, at 7 p.m. 

The Players: Edwin Booth's Club

16 Gramercy Park South, NYC 

Free, but Reservations Requested

 

In association with The Players Foundation, we're delighted to present The Lives of Shakespeare, a trilogy in which playwright Mary Jane Schaefer explores the struggles of an artist whose double life as a respected citizen of Stratford and as an influential dramatist in London had a significant impact not only on his work but on such family members as the younger of his two daughters. 

 

We hope you’ll join us for one or more of the three evenings in which director Mark Graham and his stellar cast offer presentations: “Shakespeare Rising” (Tuesday), “Judith Shakespeare Has Her Say” (Wednesday), and “Shakespeare and the Heart’s Desire” (Thursday). These powerful scripts have attracted a great deal of interest and are being considered for theatrical production.   

 

Speaking of Shakespeare

With Critic Peter Marks

Of The Washington Post

 

Wednesday, October 17, at 8 p.m. 

The National Arts Club

15 Gramercy Park South, NYC 

Free, but Reservations Requested

 

In 2002, after nine years with the New York Times, Peter Marks joined the Washington Post as chief theater critic. In that role he covers everything from pre-Broadway shows at Arena Stage, the National Theatre, and the Kennedy Center to innovative productions at venues such as the Folger Theatre (a home for gifted directors like Aaron Posner), Ford's Theater (which still attracts our nation's political leaders to its presentations), the Shakespeare Theatre Company (which Michael Kahn has established as a leading classical venue), and Signature Theatre (which has become renowned for Eric Schaeffer's sensitive renderings of Sondheim musicals).   

Mr. Marks is a nationally-recognized observer whose reviews, commentary, and profiles explore key trends in New York, London, and other cultural centers.

  

Email John Andrews at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. to reserve seats for these events. And for information about other Guild offerings, visit www.shakesguild.org.

 

 

 

 

Dieter Mehl (1933-2018)

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 29.0320  Wednesday, 12 September 2018

 

From:        Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         September 12, 2018 at 6:07:44 AM EDT

Subject:    Dieter Mehl (1933-2018)

 

From International Shakespeare Conference:

 

I’m writing with the sad news that Dieter Mehl passed away on 3 September. Dieter was formerly President of the German Shakespeare Society, and he attended the ISC over many years. I commend the attached obituary as a warm reminder of his personality and a record of his wide-ranging scholarly achievements. His death represents a considerable loss to the community of Shakespeareans.

 

Professor John Jowett

The Shakespeare Institute

International Shakespeare Conference Secretary

 

 

Dietmar Kanthak, General-Anzeiger Bonn, 04 September 2018 (Bonn), page 9.

 

Quality above all else

Obituary for Dieter Mehl (21 September 1933-3 September 2018)

 

A scholar of the first rank, Mehl was a softly-spoken man. But beneath the surface his stance was invariably considered and unambiguous. During his time as President of the German Shakespeare Society he both welcomed and paid tribute to many of the conference speakers who had been invited there. If you had the eyes and feel for it, it was possible to read Mehl’s introductions and words of thanks between the lines. There was always a value judgment hidden in his friendly turns of phrase. Mehl very often used a compliment to pass on his criticism of less-than-outstanding talks and papers . 

 

Sometimes his fine sense of irony was visible only in the subtlest change of facial expression. But the important point in each and every case was that there had to be criticism: it was Mehl’s lifeblood as a critic. This professor set the greatest store by the highest quality in scholarship. It certainly did not happen by chance. At the end of his book Shakespeare’s Hamlet (C. H. Beck, 2007), Mehl noted: “I would also like to thank my academic teachers and mentors who first helped me truly to understand Hamlet: Levin Ludwig Schücking, Wolfgang Clemen and Clifford Leech.” Big names, all three and true giants in the field of English studies. And it was in these academic circles that Dieter Mehl, born in Munich in 1933, also felt at home. The evidence can be found in his publications on Shakespeare, medieval English literature, the drama and lyric poetry of the Renaissance, and modern literature, with a particular focus on D. H. Lawrence.

 

Mehl studied English and German Studies and History at the Universities of Munich, Durham, and Göttingen. In 1960 he received his doctorate from the University of Munich on the subject of “The Elizabethan Dumb Show”. From 1968 to 1998 he taught at the University of Bonn. 

 

As the first President of the reunified Shakespeare Society, Mehl saw history being written before his eyes. Founded in 1864 in Weimar, the Society is one of the most important literary associations in Germany. A casualty of the divided Germany, it was one of German Reunification’s very many beneficiaries. Mehl was heavily involved in the business of bringing together the separated Societies with all possible speed. In hindsight it now seems only fitting that he was the one who presided over the Shakespeare Society as it embarked on its new journey, shaped once again by a common and shared purpose. In 1993 he was the perfect “Wessi” in Weimar. With the reunification of the Societies, which he chaired as President from 1993 to 2002, a thing that he had long yearned for had at last become a reality.

 

**********

 

Dietmar Kanthak, General-Anzeiger Bonn, 04.09.2018 (Bonn), Seite 9.

 

Qualität muss sein

 

Zum Tod des Bonner Anglisten Dieter Mehl (21.09.1933-03.09.2018)

 

Der große Gelehrte Mehl war ein Mann der leisen Töne. Dahinter verbarg sich aber stets eine klare Haltung. In seiner Zeit als Präsident der Deutschen Shakespeare-Gesellschaft musste er viele Gäste als Redner bei den Tagungen der literarischen Vereinigung begrüßen und würdigen. Wer wollte und ein Sensorium dafür besaß, konnte in den Einführungen und Dankesworten Mehls zwischen den Zeilen lesen. In seinen freundlichen Formulierungen verbarg sich immer auch ein Urteil. Die Kritik an nicht so glänzenden philologischen Vorträgen überreichte Mehl häufig in Form eines Kompliments.

 

Manchmal wurde die feine Ironie auch nur im subtilen Mienenspiel sichtbar. In jedem Fall galt: Kritik musste sein, da konnte Mehl nicht aus seiner Haut. Dieser Professor legte Wert auf höchste Qualität. Das kam nicht von ungefähr. Am Ende seines Buches „Shakespeares Hamlet“ (C. H. Beck, 2007) notierte Mehl: „Dank schulde ich auch meinen akademischen Lehrern, die mir den Text des Hamlet nahe gebracht haben: Levin Ludwig Schücking, Wolfgang Clemen und Clifford Leech.“ Große Namen, Giganten der Anglistik. In deren akademischen Sphären war auch der 1933 in München geborene Dieter Mehl zu Hause. Davon zeugen seine Veröffentlichungen zu Shakespeare, englischer Literatur des Mittelalters, Lyrik und Drama der Renaissance und zu moderner Literatur unter besonderer Berücksichtigung von D. H. Lawrence. 

 

Mehl studierte Anglistik, Germanistik und Geschichte an den Universitäten von München, Durham und Göttingen. 1960 wurde er an der Universität München über das Thema „Die Funktion des ,Dumb Show' im elisabethanischen Drama“ promoviert. Zwischen 1968 und 1998 lehrte Mehl an der Bonner Universität. 

 

Mehl war als erster Präsident der wiedervereinigten Shakespeare-Gesellschaft mittendrin, als Geschichte geschrieben wurde. Die 1864 in Weimar gegründete Gesellschaft ist eine der bedeutendsten literarischen Vereinigungen des Landes. Sie war Opfer der Teilung Deutschlands und Nutznießer ihrer Überwindung 1990.

Mehl war maßgeblich am Prozess der raschen Annäherung der Gesellschaften beteiligt. Es erscheint in der Rückschau nur konsequent, dass er als Präsident den Aufbruch in die neue gemeinsame Zukunft mitgestaltete. Er war 1993 der perfekte Wessi in Weimar. Mit der Wiedervereinigung der Gesellschaften, die er zwischen 1993 und 2002 als Präsident leitete, war für ihn eine „herbeigesehnte Situation“ Wirklichkeit geworden.

 

Publications 

 

Books and Critical Editions

Die Funktion des 'Dumb Show' im elisabethanischen Drama (doctoral thesis, München, 1960).

Die Pantomime im Drama der Shakespearezeit, Schriftenreihe der Deutschen Shakespeare-Gesellschaft West, X (Heidelberg, 1964); [extended version of the doctoral thesis].

The Elizabethan Dumb Show: The History of a Dramatic Convention (London, 1965); extended translation.

Die mittelenglischen Romanzen des 13. und 14. Jahrhunderts, Anglistische Forschungen, 93 (Heidelberg, 1967).

The Middle English Romances of the Thirteenth and Fourteenth Centuries (London, 1968); extended translation.

Geoffrey Chaucer. Eine Einführung in seine erzählenden Dichtungen, Grundlagen der Anglistik und Amerikanistik, 7 (Berlin, 1973).

Der englische Roman bis zum Ende des 18. Jahrhunderts, Studienreihe Englisch,28 (Düsseldorf, 1977).

Die Tragödien Shakespeares. Eine Einführung, Grundlagen der Anglistik und Amerikanistik, 13 (Berlin, 1983).

Die Zeit der Renaissance, in: Schirmer, Walter F., Geschichte der englischen und amerikanischen Literatur, 6. Aufl. (Tübingen, 1983), I, 227-347.

Geoffrey Chaucer: An Introduction to his Narrative Poetry (Cambridge, 1986).

Shakespeare's Tragedies: An Introduction (Cambridge, 1986).

D. H. Lawrence, The Fox, The Captain's Doll, The Ladybird, The Cambridge Edition of the Works of D. H. Lawrence (Cambridge, 1992).

D. H. Lawrence, The Fox, The Captain's Doll, The Ladybird, ed. Dieter Mehl with an Introduction and Notes by David Ellis, Penguin Books (London, 1994) [The Cambridge D. H. Lawrence]; with new chronology, introduction by Helen Dunmore, further reading etc, Penguin Classics, 2006.

D. H. Lawrence, The Woman Who Rode Away and Other Stories, The Cambridge Edition of the Works of D. H. Lawrence (Cambridge, 1995) [with Christa Jansohn].

Was sollen Anglisten und Amerikanisten lesen? (Berlin, 1995) [with Hans Bungert and Christa Jansohn].

D. H. Lawrence, The Woman Who Rode Away and Other Stories, ed. Dieter Mehl and Christa Jansohn with an Introduction and Notes by N. H. Reeve, Penguin Books (London, 1996) [The Cambridge D. H. Lawrence]

D. H. Lawrence, The First and Second Lady Chatterley Novels, The Cambridge Edition of the Works of D. H. Lawrence (Cambridge, 1999) [with Christa Jansohn]

English Literature in the Age of Chaucer, Longman Literature in English Series (London, 2001).

The Reception of D. H. Lawrence in Europe, The Reception of British and Irish Authors in Europe (London, 2007) [with Christa Jansohn].

Shakespeares Hamlet, Beck Wissen (München, 2007).

Eine historische Episode: Die Wiedervereinigung der Deutschen Shakespeare-Gesellschaft. Persönliche Erinnerungen. Studien zur Englischen Literatur, 26 (Münster, 2013).

 

 

Editions

Das Vorlesebuch (Ebenhausen, 1954).

Das Vorlesebuch II (Ebenhausen, 1955) revised new edition of both volumes as Das Große Vorlesebuch (Ebenhausen, 1966).

Sein Reich - die Erde. Eine Anthologie aus unserer Zeit (Berlin, 1956).

Das englische Drama. Vom Mittelalter bis zur Gegenwart, 2 Bde. (Düsseldorf, 1970).

Essays and Studies (London, 1979).

Archiv für das Studium der neueren Sprachen und Literaturen, vol. 219-252 (1982-2001); co-edited with Christa Jansohn: 2001-2015): http://www.esv.info/z/archiv/zeitschriften.html

European Studies in English Literature (Cambridge, 1987- ).

Studien zur englischen Literatur (Münster, 1990- ). http://www.lit-verlag.de/reihe/SEL

Wolfgang Clemen, Interpretationen zur englischen Literatur (Münster, 1992) [with Wolfgang Weiß].

Shakespeares Sonette in europäischen Perspektiven (Münster, 1993) [mit Wolfgang Weiß].

Shakespeare and the Twentieth Century. The Selected Proceedings of the Shakespeare Association World Congress Los Angeles, 1996, ed. Jonathan Bate,, Jill L. Levenson and Dieter Mehl. Newark and London, 1998

Plotting Early Modern London. New Essays on Jacobean City Comedy, ed. Dieter Mehl, Angela Stock and Anne-Julia Zwierlein.. Aldershot, Hampshire, 2004.

Shakespeare unter den Deutschen. Vorträge des Symposiums vom 15. Bis 17.Mai 2014 in der Akademie der Wissenschaften und der Literatur| Mainz, ed Christa Jansohn, unter Mitwirkung von Werner Habicht, Dieter Mehl und Philip Redl (Stuttgart: Steiner, 2015).

Shakespeare Jubilees: 1769 – 2014, ed. Christa Jansohn. Dieter Mehl (Münster: LIT, 2015) 

 

 

Translations

Charles Dickens, The Two Tales of the Bagman / Die zwei Erzählungen des Handlungsreisenden, Edition Langewiesche (Ebenhausen, 1957, dtv zweisprachig, 1978; überarbeitete Neuausgabe als The Bagman’s Tales / Die Erzählungen des Handlungsreisenden, dtv, 2002).

Geoffrey Chaucer, Five Canterbury Tales / Fünf Canterbury-Geschichten, Edition Langewiesche (Ebenhausen, 1958, 2. Aufl. 1964).

Jonathan Swift, A Voyage to Liliput / Gulliver's Reise nach Liliput, Edition Langewiesche (Ebenhausen, 1959,, dtv zweisprachig, 1977, überarb. Ausg. 1983).

English Poems / Englische Gedichte, ausgewählt und in Prosa übersetzt, Edition Langewiesche (Ebenhausen, 1965, Neuausgabe, dtv zweisprachig, 1981).

 

 

Articles and Notes

c. 130 articles and notes in various journals (publications on topics ranging from the middle ages to the 20th century [amongst others, the Renaissance, Shakespeare’s non-dramatic works, D. H. Lawrence, Editorial Studies, Reception History]).

 

 

Reviews

c. 370 reviews in various journals.

 

 

 

Book Announcement: Shakespeare's Early Readers A Cultural History from 1590 to 1800

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 29.0319  Wednesday, 12 September 2018

 

From:        Jean-Christophe Mayer <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         September 11, 2018 at 1:37:56 PM EDT

Subject:    Book Announcement: Shakespeare's Early Readers A Cultural History from 1590 to 1800

 

Book Announcement:

 

Jean-Christophe Mayer, Shakespeare’s Early Readers A Cultural History from 1590 to 1800, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2018, xv + 259 p. ISBN 9781107138339.

 

Abstract:

Who were Shakespeare’s first readers and what did they think of his works? Offering the first dedicated account of the ways in which Shakespeare’s texts were read in the centuries during which they were originally produced, Jean-Christophe Mayer reconsiders the role of readers in the history of Shakespeare’s rise to fame and in the history of canon formation. Addressing an essential formative ‘moment’ when Shakespeare became a literary dramatist, this book explores six crucial fields: literacy; reading and life-writing; editing Shakespeare’s text; marking Shakespeare for the theatre; commonplacing; and passing judgement. Through close examination of rare material, some of which has never been published before, and covering both the marks left by readers in their books and early manuscript extracts of Shakespeare, Mayer demonstrates how the worlds of print and performance overlapped at a time when Shakespeare offered a communal text, the ownership of which was essentially undecided. 

  • The first dedicated study of the reading reception of Shakespeare's texts in the two centuries after they were produced
  • Explores rare, often previously unpublished, material to reconsider the role of readers in the history of Shakespeare's rise to fame and in the history of canon formation
  • Presents thirty images, allowing readers to see for themselves the engagements made by readers of Shakespeare's texts

Publisher information:

https://tinyurl.com/ybjgjyre

 

Shakespeare's Early Readers
A Cultural History from 1590 to 1800

  • AUTHOR: Jean-Christophe Mayer, French National Centre for Scientific Research (CNRS) and Université Paul-Valéry, Montpellier
  • DATE PUBLISHED: September 2018
  • AVAILABILITY: In stock 
  • FORMAT: Hardback
  • ISBN: 9781107138339

 

 

 

I’m off Tomorrow

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 29.0318  Wednesday, 12 September 2018

 

From:        Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         Wednesday, September 12, 2018

Subject:     I’m off Tomorrow

 

Dear Subscribers,

 

I leave tomorrow morning for a stop off at my younger daughter Rebecca’s place to drop off her birthday presents on my way to Barre, MA. Then the remainder of the of the trip from Malvern, PA, to the Barre Center for Buddhist Studies.

 

The two weeks I will be away, SHAKSPER will be in the very capable hands of Associate Editor Stephanie Chamberlain. 

 

Hardy

 

 

 

Associate Editor Will Be Taking Over

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 29.0307  Friday, 7 September 2018

 

From:        Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         Friday, September 7, 2018

Subject:    Associate Editor Will Be Taking Over

 

Dear Subscribers:

 

I leave on Thursday, September 13 for a two-week jhana retreat at the Barre Center for Buddhist Studies in Barre, MA.

 

Starting next Thursday, Associate Editor Stephanie Chamberlain will be editing SHAKSPER while I am away.

 

I will be returning at the end of the month when I will take back over editing responsibilities then. 

 

It is really great to have such a competent and willing Associate Editor to continue the work of SHAKSPER during times when I am away. Thank you, Stephanie.

 

Best wishes,

Hardy

 

 

 

Book Announcement: Shakespeare and London

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 29.0302  Tuesday, 4 September 2018

 

From:        Duncan Salkeld <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         September 3, 2018 at 3:31:58 PM EDT

Subject:    Book Announcement: Shakespeare and London

 

I write to say that Shakespeare and London (OUP) is now available on both sides of the Atlantic.

 

The book is structured as follows:


      Introduction

  1. Stratford to London
  2. Places
  3. People
  4. Art/Authority
  5. Diversity
  6. Conclusion

Among other things it argues (a) that the Curtain pre-dated The Theatre (but not by much), (b) that we can ascertain a fairly precise London address for Shakespeare’s brother Edmund, and (c) that Falstaff was created in part as a response to Sir William Brooke’s sons, William and George.

 

Here's a link to the book, with further details: https://global.oup.com/academic/product/shakespeare-and-london-9780198709954?lang=en&cc=gb

 

Thanks 

Duncan Salkeld

 

 

Shakespeare and London

By Duncan Salkeld

  • Presents ground-breaking research on Shakespeare's connections with London
  • Sheds new light on significant locations for Shakespeare's work, the people with whom he associated, his resistance to the pressure from the City authorities, and the cultural diversity of early modern London
  • Draws on a range of documentary sources including City parish registers and the archives of London's Bridewell Hospital
  • Lucidly written, easily accessible, and helpfully illustrated

Stratford made the man, but London made the phenomenon that is Shakespeare. This volume takes an historical approach to Shakespeare’s connections with London. It explores Stratford’s various links with the capital, significant locations for Shakespeare’s work, people with whom he associated, his resistance to pressure from the City authorities, and the cultural diversity of early modern London. Among many aspects of his life in the City and its environs, it covers the playhouses in Shoreditch, his associations with Bishopsgate, his brother Edmund’s residence on Bankside, and elements of London life that went into the making of Falstaff. Being ‘forest born’, he was always an outsider and could never have been, or felt, accepted as a citizen. We find him repeatedly a sojourner in the City, on the move. His home and family lay in Stratford. Despite his success in the capital, we might almost imagine him to have been a reluctant Londoner. 

Shakespeare and London draws on a range of documentary sources including City parish registers, county sessions records and the archives of London's Bridewell Hospital. It sets out details about those who inhabited Shakespeare's milieu, or played some part in shaping his writing and acting career. This volume is Ideal reading for undergraduates, graduates, and specialists of Shakespeare studies.

 

 

 

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