Announcements

Rhodes College: Global Early Modern Position; Brotton and Shapiro Discussion

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 27.303  Monday, 19 September 2016

 

From:        Newstok_Scott <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         September 17, 2016 at 3:13:20 PM EDT

Subject:    Rhodes College: Global Early Modern Position; Brotton and Shapiro Discussion

 

Dear SHAKSPER,

 

I write to share a position announcement as well as an upcoming event.

 

The English Department at Rhodes College invites applications for an Assistant Professor of English (Tenure Track). We seek a scholar of non-Shakespearean early modern literature, with a particular focus on global and transnational approaches to the era. We would welcome additional interest in digital humanities, film studies, gender and sexuality studies, or race and ethnic studies. The 3/2 course load includes introductory through advanced offerings within the department, as well as first-year writing seminars and other general education courses. Please apply online at https://jobs.rhodes.edu/postings/1865

 

On February 22 Rhodes College will host Jerry Brotton and James Shapiro for a discussion about Judaism and Islam in early modern England. Brotton just published a brief piece in the New York Times on “England’s Forgotten Muslim History” in anticipation of his forthcoming book “The Sultan and the Queen: The Untold Story of Elizabeth and Islam.”

 

Please feel free to contact me for more information.

 

Yours sincerely,

Scott Newstok

Department of English

Rhodes College

www.rhodes.edu/newstok

 

 

 

Letterpress Printing Workshops in Leicester, England

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 27.302  Monday, 19 September 2016

 

From:        Gabriel Egan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         September 17, 2016 at 9:49:15 AM EDT

Subject:    Letterpress Printing Workshops in Leicester, England

 

SHAKSPERians may be interested to hear that ...

 

The Centre for Textual Studies (CTS) at De Montfort University in Leicester, England, is offering two 2-hour hands-on letter-press printing workshops for graduate students and their tutors at 4-6pm on 2 November and 9 November 2016. The second session will build on the first and we should, in that time, be able to typeset, impose, and print at least one of Shakespeare’s Sonnets. There is no charge for the sessions, but booking a place is essential. It is possible to attend only one of the two sessions, but then you’d miss half of the total printing process.

 

A description of the sessions and pictures of previous ones are at http://cts.dmu.ac.uk/events/printing-workshops

 

Booking should be made by emailing the CTS’s Paul Brown

<This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>.

 

Prof Gabriel Egan

Director, Centre for Textual Studies

De Montfort University http://cts.dmu.ac.uk

 

 

 

Routledge Re-Issue of Terence Hawkes’ TALKING ANIMALS

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 27.301  Tuesday, 13 September 2016

 

From:        Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         Tuesday, September 13, 2016

Subject:    Routledge Re-Issue of Terence Hawkes’ TALKING ANIMALS

 

I have just learned from John Drakakis that Terence Hawkes’ Talking Animals has just been re-issued by Routledge in its Routledge Revivals series. 

 

https://www.routledge.com/Routledge-Revivals-Shakespeares-Talking-Animals-1973-Language-and/Hawkes/p/book/9781138237131

 

Routledge Revivals: Shakespeare’s Talking Animals (1973)

Language and Drama in Society

By Terence Hawkes

© 1973 – Routledge

247 pages

 

 

About the Book:

 

First published in 1973, this book is about Shakespeare, language and drama. The first part introduces some common ideas of anthropology and linguistics into an area where they serve as a base for the discussion of usually literary matters. It attempts to link language to our experience of speech — examining its range, texture, and social functions. In part two, the author argues that in Elizabethan culture there was a greater investment in the complexities and demands of speech due to the widespread illiteracy of the time. It examines eight of Shakespeare’s plays, together with one of Ben Jonson’s, in light of their concern with various aspects of the role of spoken language in society.

 

 

Table of Contents:

 

Acknowledgements

Introduction

 

Part I: Language, Culture, Drama 

1 Language as Culture 

2 Gesture as Language 

3 Drama as Language 

4 Drama as Culture

 

Part II: Shakespeare 

5 Elizabethan Language, Culture, Drama 

6 Love’s Labour’s Lost: rhyme against reason 

7 Richard II: the word against the word 

8 Hamlet: the plays on words 

9 Othello, Macbeth, and Jonson’s Epicoene: the language of men 

10 King Lear and Antony and Cleopatra: the language of love 

11 The Tempest: speaking your language 

 

Part III: Conclusions – New Languages for Old 

12 Drama versus Theatre 

 

Index

 

 

 

Shakespeare Pro app for iPhone/iPad

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 27.296  Monday, 12 September 2016

 

From:        Ron Severdia <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         September 8, 2016 at 7:12:16 PM EDT

Subject:    Shakespeare Pro app for iPhone/iPad

 

[Editor’s Note: PlayShakespeare.com freely hosts SHAKSPER.net thanks to Ron Severdia. Ron also handles the SHAKSPER.net’s often arcane technical issues and patiently answers my questions about Joomla in my capacity as web site administrator. I encourage you to consider replying to Ron’s requests for ways of improving the Shakespeare Pro app for iPhone/iPad’s usefulness for scholars and teachers of Shakespeare. I greatly value all of Ron’s assistance, and I offer my sincerest appreciation for all responses to his queries. –Hardy]he Shakespeare Pro app for iPhone/iPad

 

Hello,

 

Last month, the Shakespeare Pro app for iPhone/iPad celebrated its 8th year with over 8 million downloads. The first version of the app was quite simple, mainly consisting of our editions of Shakespeare’s works and some basic study materials. Since then, I’ve added a variety of features including search, a glossary (by Shakespeare’s Words), notes, bookmarks, the First Folio (and some quartos), extensive study materials, and more. My personal goal for the app was to be the best tool possible for the following audiences:

 

1. Actors and directors - rehearsal and research

2. Students and teachers - classroom and study

3. Scholars - research and reference

 

Now, I’m trying to determine the next steps for the future and in order to do that, I’d like to better understand the problems you are trying to solve when doing your Shakespeare-related job. Do you gather/calculate statistics about the works? Do you share snippets with your students? Do you create a new syllabus each year or semester? Do you memorize lines? I would like to better understand what types of tasks you perform and how those could be improved or even eliminated to save time.

 

Thank you for sharing your invaluable insight.

 

Ron Severdia

 

PlayShakespeare.com

The Ultimate Free Shakespeare Resource

 

Download the free Shakespeare App on iTunes

http://bit.ly/shakes-app

http://bit.ly/shakesproapp

 

Download the free Shakespeare App on Google Play

http://bit.ly/shakesandroid

 

 

 

CFP: Slings and Arrows

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 27.295  Monday, 12 September 2016

 

From:        Andrew Bretz <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         September 9, 2016 at 7:59:07 PM EDT

Subject:    CFP: Slings and Arrows

 

Request for Papers

 

Edited collection for submission to the University of Toronto Press.

Slings & Arrows: Performing Shakespeare as Canada

 

Edited by Kailin Wright (St. Francis Xavier University), Don Moore (University of Guelph), Andrew Bretz (Wilfrid Laurier University)

 

Chapter proposals are invited for a collection of essays that will explore the hit Canadian television series Slings & Arrows—a show that features Shakespeare as an enduring symbol of Canada. Slings & Arrows televises the theatrical performance of national identity, as theorized by Alan Filewod, and in doing so satirizes both Canada as a nation and Shakespeare as a high-art object of veneration.

 

1. Papers on all topics related to Slings & Arrows are welcome, though the editors offer the following suggestions/questions for guidance: Shakespeare as Canada Shakespeare has been celebrated as Canada’s most popular playwright—a conceit that addresses the significance of the Stratford Festival as well as the national relevance of Slings & Arrows. The show, then, does not merely explore Shakespeare and Canada, but rather, Shakespeare as Canada. This section will be populated with chapters that take up the premise of Slings & Arrows’ investigation of the symbolism and/or metaphor of Shakespeare as Canada.

  • Slings & Arrows and Cultural Identity Though Canada is an increasingly multicultural nation and the popular performance of Shakespeare in Canada reflects that diversity, does Slings and Arrows?
  • Does Slings & Arrows represent the racial diversity, or lack thereof, in Canadian theatre today?
  • Does the lack of representation of French or of Quebecois theatre, for instance, hinder the construction of Shakespeare as Canada, understood through Slings and Arrows?

 

2. The Politics of Reception of Slings & Arrows

 

Who is the audience of Slings & Arrows? The question is deceptively simple. From the spectatorship of the New Burbage Festival audiences, to the real offstage audiences of the Stratford Festival who helped inform the creation of the show, to the real television audiences both in Canada and abroad, the exact character of Slings & Arrows’ audience shifts with kaleidoscopic perspective.

 

3. Slings & Arrows and the Canadian Theatre/Film Industry

 

The Canadian theatre industry is in some ways totally unique in the Western world and in other ways shares many of the same problems regarding funding, canonicity, diversity, and marketing as other places. Chapters in this section will investigate the ways in which Slings and Arrows both satirizes and reflects  the world of Canadian theatre and film.

 

4.Inheritance, Adaptation, and Intermediality in Slings & Arrows

 

Slings & Arrows questions Canadian theatre’s ethical inheritance of Shakespeare’s multiple, heterogenous spectres in whose “borrowed robes” institutions like the Stratford Festival have draped themselves as a way of also reconsidering our shared notions of artistic merit. Chapters in this section will investigate the hauntological and intermedial appropriation and adaptation of Shakespeare in Slings & Arrows.

 

5. Institutional Hauntings of Stratford and New Burbage

 

The relationship between the Stratford Festival and the New Burbage Festival is not one of simple identity, even though many of the actors and creators of Slings & Arrows drew upon their experiences at Stratford in the creation of the show. This section will investigate the differences, similarities, and consonances between the two festivals--one fictional, one actual--and suggest how they mutually inform each other’s histories, present, and possible futures.

 

Keywords: Shakespeare, adaptation, Canada, television, theatre, nationalism, intermediality, identity, spectres, popular/high culture, satire, audience, arts industries, Stratford Festival.

 

Final chapters should be between 6000-9000 words.

 

Please submit enquiries and chapter proposals (250-500 words) to the editors:  

 

Kailin Wright (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)

Don Moore (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)

Andrew Bretz (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)

 

 by January 1, 2017. Chapters will be expected by July 31, 2017.

 

 

 

A Shakespearean Evening with Alison and Adam Gopnik

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 27.294  Monday, 12 September 2016

 

From:        John F. Andrews <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         September 8, 2016 at 2:53:07 PM EDT

Subject:    A Shakespearean Evening with Alison and Adam Gopnik

 

Is it True that Play's the Thing?

A Conversation With Writers

Alison and Adam Gopnik 

 

Wednesday, September 14, at 8 p.m.

The National Arts Club

15 Gramercy Park South, Manhattan

Admission Free, but Reservations Requested

 

We’re delighted to launch our 2016-17 Shakespeare Guild season with a remarkable brother-sister act. 

 

One of our most popular Speaking of Shakespeare guests over the last decade has been Adam Gopnik of the New Yorker, a brilliant observer who has given us such classics as Paris to the Moon and Angels and Ages: A Short Book on Lincoln and Darwin. But many of Adam's admirers are unaware that his older sibling is also a distinguished author. A professor of philosophy and psychology at the University of California, Berkeley, Alison Gopnik publishes a widely-read column in the Wall Street Journal.

 

Readers who saw a recent preview in the New York Times will know that Alison’s latest book is The Gardener and the Carpenter, a new study of the way children learn. Her research shows that an approach that encourages “open-ended curiosity” is the key to a life of problem-solving and creativity. She finds, in short, that Shakespeare is right, and  “play’s the thing” for educators who aspire to foster the insights and skills that lead not only to illuminating works of art but to significant breakthroughs in science, technology, and other fields of endeavor. 

 

Alison and Adam Gopnik occasionally draw from and allude to each other’s work, but it is rare for them to appear together in a conversational format. So we hope you’ll join us for what promises to be a very special evening.             

 

Visit www.shakesguild.org/events.html for detail about this and other Shakespeare Guild offerings. And please email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. if you wish to take part in this program.   

 

 

 

 

Roundtable Discussion on Collaborative Shakespeare and Education Projects

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 27.293  Monday, 12 September 2016

 

From:        BSA <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         September 7, 2016 at 4:12:05 AM EDT

Subject:    Roundtable Discussion on Collaborative Shakespeare and Education Projects

 

The British Shakespeare Association

 

Roundtable Discussion on Collaborative Shakespeare and Education Projects

 

The Sydney-based Shakespeare Reloaded project (shakespearereloaded.edu.au) is jointly hosting with the London Shakespeare Centre an informal roundtable discussion on the topic of collaborative projects dealing with Shakespeare and education. It will be a 2-hour session around lunchtime on Tuesday 13 September in London. If you are an academic, teacher or practitioner involved in a collaborative project in this area (which might involve, for example, partnerships between university, schools, arts or heritage organisations) and would like to share your experiences and ideas with others at this roundtable please contact Liam Semler (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.). The aim is to learn from each other’s experiences in an informal context and potentially explore possibilities for future collaborations in Shakespeare pedagogy.

 

 

 

Podcast on Shakespeare and New Historicism

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 27.289  Tuesday, 30 August 2016

 

From:        Neema Parvini <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         August 29, 2016 at 5:45:44 PM EDT

Subject:    Podcast on Shakespeare and New Historicism

 

http://blogs.surrey.ac.uk/shakespeare/2016/08/29/shakespeare-and-contemporary-theory-27-shakespeare-and-new-historicist-theory-with-evelyn-gajowski-and-neema-parvini/

 

Neema welcomes back Evelyn Gajowski, editor for the Arden Shakespeare and Theory series. In a change from the norm, in this episode, Evelyn turns the tables and interviews Neema about his forthcoming book Shakespeare and New Historicist Theory. Topics include the place of theory in Shakespeare studies; differences between new historicism and cultural materialism; presentism; the re-emergence of positivism; and Shakespeare's empathy.

 

 

 

Conference: Early Modern Debts: 21-22 September 2017

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 27.287  Monday, 29 August 2016

 

From:        Christa Jansohn <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         August 29, 2016 at 2:26:45 AM EDT

Subject:    Conference: Early Modern Debts: 21-22 September 2017


A symposium entitled ‘Early Modern Debts’ will take place at the Otto-Friedrich-Universitaet Bamberg, 21-22 September 2017, organized by Dr George Oppitz-Trotman (Humboldt Fellow, Lehrstuhl für Britische Kultur).

Several internationally renowned scholars, including Prof. Lena Orlin (Georgetown) and Prof. Lorna Hutson (St Andrews) have stated an intention to come; the theme has already excited significant interest for its timeliness and focus. It promises to be an exciting and important event. More details can be found at the conference website: early-modern-debts.space
 

Prof. Dr. Christa Jansohn
Lehrstuhl für Britische Kultur
Kapuzinerstr. 16
D-96047 Bamberg
Phone: 0049-(0)951-863 2270
E-Mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Internet:
http://www.uni-bamberg.de/britcult

 

Co-Editor: Archiv fuer das Studium der Neueren Sprachen und Literaturen:
http://www.esv.info/z/archiv/zeitschriften.html

 

Co-Editor: Editionen in der Kritik:
http://www.weidler-verlag.de/Reihen/Berliner_Beitr__zur_Editionswi/berliner_beitr__zur_editionswi.html

 

Co-Editor: Jahrbuch Literatur und Medizin:

http://www.uni-bamberg.de/en/britcult/contact/staff/prof-dr-christa-jansohn/information-on-the-editorial-boards/

 

 

 

 

Announcement of Impending Hiatus

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 27.284   Sunday, 28 August 2016

 

From:        Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         Sunday, August 28, 2016

Subject:    Announcement of Impending Hiatus 

 

Dear Subscribers:

 

Thursday evening, I leave for another week in Devon. I will not be editing submissions during this time. However, I encourage you to continue to submit, especially for ongoing discussions, and I will edit and format them when I return.

 

Hardy

 

 

 

First Folio in DC Events

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 27.274  Monday, 22 August 2016

 

From:        Jill Bradbury <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         August 22, 2016 at 11:55:25 AM EDT

Subject:    First Folio in DC Events

 

Dear list members – 

 

If you are in the Washington, DC area in October, please visit our First Folio! The Book that Gave Us Shakespeare month programs. All events are free and open to the public. A full description appears in the attached pdf, but highlights include:

  • Complementary exhibit on Shakespeare in American Deaf History, plus Play the Knave, the Hofstra Globe model, and a tactile experience table.
  • Lecture series on Visual Shakespeare and Shakespeare in ASL.
  • Visual Shakespeare Festival featuring free workshops and performances.
  • Academic symposium on Visual and ASL Shakespeare with keynotes by Peter Donaldson and Peter Novak.
  • Gallaudet Theatre Program production of A Midsummer Night's Dream with Howie Seago and Helen Hayes winner Miranda Medugno.

Best, 

Jill

Professor

Department of English

 

Project Director, DC stop of First Folio! The Book that Gave Us Shakespeare, on tour from the Folger Shakespeare Library

Coming to Gallaudet University October, 2016

 https://twitter.com/SHXGallaudet

 https://www.facebook.com/SHXGallaudet

 https://www.instagram.com/SHXGallaudet

 https://www.gallaudet.edu/first-folio.html

 

PDF Program Description:   pdf First Folio Gallaudet events (377 KB)

 

[Editor’s Note: This project seems so important to me that I am reproducing the Program Description below. You are , of course, encouraged to download it and make it available to anyone interested.  –Hardy]

 

 

 First Folio! at Gallaudet 

October 7-30, 2016 

 

Gallaudet University will be the D. C. host site for the national traveling exhibition First Folio! The Book that Gave Us Shakespeare. This exhibit, sponsored by the Folger Shakespeare Library, the American Library Association, and the Cincinnati Museum Center, is traveling to all 50 states, D. C., and Puerto Rico in 2016, the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare’s death. First Folio! The Book that Gave Us Shakespeare is funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities: Exploring the Human Endeavor, Google.org, Vinton and Sigrid Cerf, the British Council, Stuart and Mimi Rose, and other generous donors. 

 

The First Folio! exhibit will come to Gallaudet in October 2016. During this month, Gallaudet will host a celebration of visual Shakespeare. Events and programming will examine the history of Shakespeare in the American Deaf community, highlight the unique contributions deaf artists can make to Shakespearean theater, and showcase visual approaches to Shakespeare’s works. Events are free and open to the public, with the exception of the opening reception. Registration required for some events. Email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. at least two weeks in advance to request accommodations such as tactile or close vision interpreting. 

 

 

First Folio! Month Schedule 

Week One 

10/7(Fri): Opening reception and viewing of folio, followed by Lecture Series #1 (Shakespeare in ASL) 

10/8 (Sat.): “Bard for a Day” family event 

Exhibition open hours beginning 10/7 

 

Week Two 

10/13 (Thurs): Lecture Series #2 (Visual Shakespeare) 

10/15 (Sat): Academic symposium on Shakespeare in ASL and Visual Shakespeare 

10/15: Titus Andronicus in ASL for Oregon Shakespeare Festival 

Exhibition open hours and student tours throughout the week 

 

Week Three 

10/20 (Thurs.): Gallaudet Production of Midsummer Night’s Dream opens 

10/22 (Sat.): Visual Shakespeare Festival 

Exhibition open hours and student tours throughout the week 

 

Week Four 

10/27 (Thurs): Homecoming Alumni Panel (Shakespeare Matters) 

10/27 (Thurs): Lecture Series #3 (Shakespeare in American Deaf History) 

10/29 (Sat.): K-12 Educators Workshop 

Exhibition open hours and student tours throughout the week First Folio! at Gallaudet October 7-30, 2016 Gallaudet University Page

 

Event Descriptions 

First Folio! The Book that Gave Us Shakespeare Exhibit 

October 7-30 

Jordan Art Gallery, Washburn Arts Building 

 

Regular Hours 10/8-10/30: Mon.-Fri., 10am-2pm; Thurs., 5-7 pm; Sat., 10am-4 pm. 

Special Hours: Fri. 10/7, 5-8pm; Sat. 10/15, 6-7pm; Fri. 10/21 and 10/28, 6-8pm; Sat. 10/22 and 10/29, 6-8pm; Sun 10/23 and 10/30, 12-2pm. 

 

The centerpiece of the exhibit will be a First Folio, opened to the famous "To be or not to be" soliloquy from Shakespeare's Hamlet. Visitors will learn about the First Folio as an object: its history, cultural significance, and continued relevance. Interpretive panels from the Folger Library will also explore the evolving attraction of the First Folio and Shakespeare’s modern impact. A complementary exhibit curated by the Gallaudet University Museum will examine the importance of Shakespeare to the American Deaf community. This exhibit features a video loop, photographs, costumes, and other material artifacts documenting the history of Shakespeare in ASL, from the earliest known productions in the 19th century to the present. Additional components related to the theme of visual Shakespeare will include a model of the Globe Theatre and an installation of the Kinect game Play the Knave. DeafBlind visitors will have opportunities for tactile experience of physical objects. Explore First Folio! The Book that Gave Us Shakespeare and Shakespeare in America Deaf History exhibits with a knowledgeable guide. Docent led tours begin every hour at the top of the hour and run approximately 30-45 minutes. No reservations needed. Tours conducted in ASL. Email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. at least two weeks in advance to request accommodations such as voice, tactile or close vision interpreting. 

 

School Tours 

Jordan Art Gallery, Washburn Arts Building and LLRH6 Colab 

M-F 10 am and 12 pm. 

A limited number of slots will be available for schools to sign up for a guided tour of the First Folio! The Book that Gave Us Shakespeare and Shakespeare in America Deaf History exhibits. The tour will be followed by an hour-long workshop developed for K-12 students by the Folger Shakespeare Library. Priority registration will be given to Deaf institutes and schools with mainstream programs for Deaf/hard of hearing students. To register, email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

Lecture Series 

October 7, 13, and 27 

Student Academic Center 1011 

The lecture series is aimed at a general audience and examines various themes such as the history of Shakespeare in the American Deaf community, the unique contributions Deaf artists can make to Shakespearean theater, and visual approaches to Shakespeare’s plays. The First Folio! The Book that Gave Us Shakespeare and Shakespeare in America Deaf History exhibits will be open prior to each lecture. All lectures will be accessible via ASL, spoken English, and captioning. Email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. at least two weeks in advance to request accommodations such as tactile or close vision interpreting. 

 

October 7 – Shakespeare in ASL 

5-8 pm: Exhibits open First Folio! at Gallaudet October 7-30, 2016 Gallaudet University Page

 

7-8:30 pm: Talks by Ethan Sinnott, Professor, Theater and Dance Program, Gallaudet University; and Peter Novak, Professor, Theater Program, University of San Francisco 

 

October 13 – Visual Shakespeare 

5-7 pm: Exhibits open 

7-8:30 pm: Talks by Michele Osherow, Folger Resident Dramaturg and Associate Professor, Department of English, UMBC; Paata Tsikurishvili, Founding Artistic Director and CEO, Synetic Theatre; and Paul Reisman, Associate Artistic Director, Faction of Fools Theatre Company. 

 

October 27 – Shakespeare in American Deaf History 

5-7 pm: Exhibits open 

7-8:30 pm: Talks by Pamela Kincheloe, Professor, Liberal Arts Support Department, National Technical Institute of the Deaf, Rochester Institute of Technology; Steve Baldwin, Independent Scholar; Aaron Kelstone, Performing Arts Program Director, National Technical Institute of the Deaf, Rochester Institute of Technology 

 

Bard for a Day 

(primarily intended for Deaf families and families with deaf/hoh children) 

October 8 

10am – 4pm 

Various locations 

Come experience Shakespeare for the family! Kids can participate in workshops led by local performing and visual artists, try on 16th-century style costumes, and take in performances by Faction of Fools, Nicolo Whimsey, Synetic Theatre, The Shakespeare Theatre Company, Cleveland Sign Stage Theatre, and more. Toddler and pre-school bards will enjoy Shakespeare themed arts and crafts, ASL Shakespeare story-telling, face painting, moon bounce, and a photo booth. Free and open to the public. Due to limited space, advance registration required for workshops. Visit www.gallaudet.edu/firstfolio for detailed schedule. Registration opens 9/24/2016. All events will accessible via ASL and spoken English. Captioning will be provided for talks and performances. Email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. at least two weeks in advance to request accommodations such as tactile or close vision interpreting. 

 

Visual/ASL Shakespeare Academic Symposium 

October 15 

9am – 5pm 

Sorenson Language and Communication Center Atrium 

Scholars and dramaturgs come together to explore visual Shakespeare and Shakespeare in ASL. Participants will discuss pre-circulated papers on visual representations of the body and disability in Shakespeare; performance, analysis, translation, history of Shakespeare in ASL; and manual/gestural rhetoric in Shakespearean performance; and other topics. Keynote presenters include Peter Novak, Professor of Theater at University of San Francisco and Peter Donaldson, Ford International Professor of Humanities and Professor of Literature at MIT and founder of the Global Shakespeares Video Project. Visit www.gallaudet.edu/firstfolio for detailed schedule. Registration is required. Email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. to register and to request accommodations such as tactile or close vision interpreting. First Folio! at Gallaudet October 7-30, 2016 Gallaudet University Page

 

Titus Andronicus in ASL for Oregon Shakespeare Festival 

October 15 

7-8:30pm 

Student Academic Center 1011 

Visiting Artist Howie Seago and Gallaudet students in his THE 495 course will present work in progress translating Titus Andronicus into ASL for Oregon Shakespeare Festival (OSF). Seago, a noted Deaf actor, has been involved with OSF since 2009 as an actor, translator, and ASL master. Seago is working on this commissioned translation of Titus with Lezlie Cross, Assistant Professor of Theatre, University of Nevada, Las Vegas; Christine Albright-Tufts, actress and instructor, and Lue Douthit, Director of Literary Development and Dramaturgy at OSF. Voice interpretation provided. Email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. at least two weeks in advance to request accommodations such as tactile or close vision interpreting. 

 

A Midsummer Night’s Dream 

October 20-November 6 

Performances Thurs.-Sat., 8pm; Sat-Sun, 2pm. 

Eastman Theatre 

Directed by Gallaudet Theatre faculty Ethan Sinnott and featuring Howie Seago as Bottom. 

 

Eyes on Shakespeare Festival 

October 22 

10am – 5pm 

Various locations 

See what it means to experience Shakespeare visually! We are thrilled to partner with a spectrum of artists, both Deaf and hearing, to open your heart and mind to the wonders of the Bard. The festival includes free performances, workshops, and talks by Deaf and hearing theater groups and performers. Featured events include Patrick Graybill in The King, produced by the National Theatre of the Deaf; The Gravedigger’s Tale, produced by the Folger Theatre; and a free performance of Gallaudet University’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream, directed by Professor of Theatre Ethan Sinnott. Visit www.gallaudet.edu/firstfolio for detailed schedule. Due to limited space, advance registration required for the workshops. Registration opens 10/8/2016. All events will accessible via ASL and spoken English. Captioning will be provided for talks and performances. Email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. at least two weeks in advance to request accommodations such as tactile or close vision interpreting. 

 

Homecoming Alumni Panel 

October 27 

2-3:30 pm 

Peikoff Alumni House 

A panel of alumni spanning 1955 to 2014 discusses their involvement in Shakespeare productions at Gallaudet and professionally. Moderated by Deaf West artistic director DJ Kurs (‘98) and Dr. Steve Baldwin (‘68). Featuring former National Theatre of the Deaf performers Patrick Graybill (‘63) and Camille Jeter-Lorello (‘12), as well as Cynthia Saltzman (‘72) and Helen Hays award winner Miranda Medugno (‘14).With special guests Fred Beam and Howie First Folio! at Gallaudet October 7-30, 2016 Gallaudet University Page

 

Seago. Voice interpretation provided. Email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. at least two weeks in advance to request accommodations such as tactile or close vision interpreting. 

 

K-12 Educators Workshop 

October 29 

9 am-5 pm 

Sorenson Language and Communication Center Atrium, 1302, and 1303 

Educators nationwide struggle with the subtleties of teaching Shakespeare. This workshop will discuss how to use the visual to support incorporation of Shakespeare at the elementary and secondary levels, issues specific to Deaf students and ASL, and resources appropriate for all ages. The morning session features a two-hour workshop on the First Folio developed by Folger Shakespeare Library K-12 education specialists. Come join us for a fantastic day of shared learning! Due to limited space, advance registration required. Visit our website to register. All events will accessible via ASL, spoken English, and captioning. 

 

 

Contact Information 

Dr. Jill Bradbury, Project Director 

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Media Inquiries 

Kaitlin Luna, University Communications 

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(202) 448-7106 voice 

(202) 250-2973 videophone 

 

 

Social Media Information 

Website: www.gallaudet.edu/firstfolio 

Facebook: First Folio at Gallaudet 

Twitter: @SHXGallaudet #SHX400 #FirstFolio #ASLSHX

 

 

 

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