Announcements

Blackfriars Conference: Colloquy Format – Extended Deadline

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 29.0298  Monday, 3 September 2018

 

From:        Sarah Enloe <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         August 31, 2018 at 3:47:13 PM EDT

Subject:    Blackfriars Conference: Colloquy Format – Extended Deadline

 

INTRODUCING A NEW COLLOQUY FORMAT--DEADLINE EXTENDED!

 

For the Tenth Biennial Blackfriars Conference, colloquies will take one of three formats: Research Paper Discussion, Actor Facilitated Exploration, and Round Table Discussion. All colloquies are 75-minute sessions. This new format paves the way for focused, research-driven exploration and discussion of Early Modern theatre practice and academia.

 

RESEARCH PAPER DISCUSSION:

Research Paper Discussion colloquies are limited to nine participants. Participants are required to submit an 8-10 page paper and abstract on the subject of their colloquy by September 1, 2019. Papers will be distributed to all colloquy participants and each paper should be read by participants prior to the start of the conference. Abstracts will be shared with all conference attendees and auditors, who will receive a copy at the start of the colloquy. Participants will briefly provide an overview of their paper during the colloquy; the majority of the colloquy will be dedicated to a discussion led by the colloquy leader and a question and answer with both the colloquy participants and auditors.

 

ACTOR FACILITATED EXPLORATION:

Actor Facilitated Exploration colloquies are limited to five participants. The colloquy leader will choose a piece of text to explore within the colloquy. The text can be a single scene, a single moment, or a selection of scenes and/or moments. Colloquy participants will work with ASC or MFA actors to explore the possibilities within the text. Colloquy participants should collaborate with one another prior to the start of the conference on what they wish to explore during the colloquy. Actor scripts are due by September 15, 2019.

 

ROUND TABLE DISCUSSION:

Round Table Discussion colloquies are limited to nine participants. The colloquy leader will choose an article, set of articles, or book relating to the subject of the colloquy for all participants to read prior to the start of the conference. Participants should submit one to three discussion questions or points of interest to their colloquy leader by September 15, 2019. The colloquy itself will consist of a discussion, led by the colloquy leader, among all colloquy participants on the selected writings. The discussion will be followed by a question and answer period with colloquy auditors.

 

SUBMISSIONS NOW OPEN

We are now accepting proposals for colloquy topics. If your topic is selected for the 2019 Blackfriars Conference, you are expected to attend the conference and lead your colloquy. Submissions close October 1, 2018.

https://americanshakespearecenter.formstack.com/forms/colloquy_topic_proposal?_ga=2.262411909.865122948.1535744659-437645027.1515437595

 

Thank you!

 

Best,

Sarah Enloe

Director of Education 

American Shakespeare Center

540-466-5869

 

The American Shakespeare Center recovers the joy and accessibility of 

Shakespeare's theatre, language, and humanity by exploring the English 

Renaissance stage and its practices through performance and education.

 

<https://www.facebook.com/americanshakespearecenter

<https://instagram.com/americanshakespearecenter/

<http://ascdangerousdreams.tumblr.com/> <https://twitter.com/shakespearectr>

 

 

 

Pre-1700 Plays on Early Print Site

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 29.0295  Friday, 31 August 2018

 

From:        Martin Mueller <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         August 30, 2018 at 4:03:58 PM EDT

Subject:    Pre-1700 Plays on Early Print Site

 

May I draw the attention of this list to the Early Print site (https://texts.earlyprint.org) , which contains linguistically annotated and partially corrected versions of 857 pre-1700 plays from the Text Creation Partnership (TCP)? The texts exist in an environment that supports collaborative curation, along the lines of the old proverb that “many hands make light work.” 257 texts are full-fledged “digital combos” with a side-by-side display of transcription and digital facsimile. The facsimiles come from a variety of sources, chief among the Boston Public Library. The current site does not yet include Shakespeare. There are better Folio texts than the TCP transcriptions, but integrating them into this site has problems that we have not quite solved. 

 

The many flaws in the TCP transcriptions have less to do with the competence of the transcribers than with the often wretched state of the digital scans of microfilms of the printed source. Three generations of undergraduates from Amherst, Northwestern, and Washington University in St. Louis worked on 510 of these plays and reduced the median number textual defects from 14 to 1.4 per 10,000 words. But much work remains to be done.

 

The texts in the collection have been graded with the help of the conventional A-F scheme of American colleges. A quarter of them have no known defects (A), another quarter have fewer than 10 defects per 10,000 words (B). Another quarter have between 10 and 35 defects (C). 15% of the texts have between 35 and 100 defects per 10,000 words, and 10% have more than 100 defects per 10,000 words (F). The D and F texts account for 80% of all defects—a good example of the familiar 80/20 or Pareto distribution.

 

Two computer science students at Northwestern (Sangrin Lee and Larry Wang) used a “long short term memory” neural network (LSTM) to produced machine-generated corrections across a corpus of 12,000 texts. These are highlighted in dark orange in the texts. They are correct about 90% of the time but need to be reviewed and challenged by human readers.  

 

Below is the summary data from the EarlyPrint site for a typical ‘C’ text. An evening’s work would transform it to ‘B’ or even ‘A’. If in addition to correcting the defective pages one were to proofread five randomly chosen clean pages and find no errors, the report of that fact would support the conclusion that this is a good enough text for many purposes. Obviously, a full proofreading would be even better.

 

Within this text errors cluster heavily on pages 3-a and 29-a and 29-b (the letter flags refer to the (usually) left and right side of the double-page microfilm image.  The run of line-initial defects on 3-a is a typical example of microfilm gutter problems (https://texts.earlyprint.org/works/A07326.xml?page=003-a). It is an even better example of how much difference a reasonably good digital image makes. 

 

 

The Heir. By May, Thomas.1620. 

Pages: 66
Words: 21259

Genre: comedy

Page images available: from Boston Public Library, PR2709.M3 A7

 

This text is an enriched version of the TCP digital transcription A07326 of text S109948 in the English Short Title Catalog (STC 17713). Textual changes and metadata enrichments aim at making the text more computationally tractable, easier to read, and suitable for network-based collaborative curation by amateur and professional end users from many walks of life. The text has been tokenized and linguistically annotated with MorphAdorner. The annotation includes standard spellings that support the display of a text in a standardized format that preserves archaic forms ('loveth', 'seekest'). Textual changes aim at restoring the text the author or stationer meant to publish.

 

Many incompletely or incorrectly transcribed words were corrected by Hannah Bredar.


This text has not been fully proofread.

 

Remaining known defects include:

 

·         106 missing or incompletely transcribed tokens.

·         3 missing passages.

 

The rate of 63.97 defects per 10,000 words puts this text in the D category of texts with between 35 and 100 defects per 10,000 words.

 

Martin Mueller

Professor Emeritus of English and Classics

Northwestern University

 

 

 

Online Dictionary of Stage Directions in English Drama, 1580-1642

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 29.0285  Thursday, 23 August 2018

 

From:        Alan Dessen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         August 22, 2018 at 2:26:44 PM EDT

Subject:    Re: SHAKSPER: Dictionary of Stage Directions Online

 

Correction: The title of my announcement might be misleading. The entire stage direction dictionary is not on-line. That could happen at some point, but that decision is up to Cambridge U.P.

 

Alan Dessen

 

[Editor’s Note: Apologies to Alan. I added the information to the announcement title, so I am responsible for the misleading. Below is the original posting. -Hardy]

 

Announcement: Online Dictionary of Stage Directions in English Drama, 1580-1642

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 29.0283  Wednesday, 22 August 2018

 

From:        Alan Dessen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         August 21, 2018 at 3:16:18 PM EDT

Subject:    Announcement: Online Dictionary of Stage Directions in English Drama, 1580-1642

 

Shortly after our Dictionary of Stage Directions in English Drama, 1580-1642 appeared in 1999, I set up a website where Leslie Thomson and I could provide some new entries and make a few corrections. More recently, we have added more than forty of our essays, most of them dealing with theatre history and/or staging. Included are essays on Greene, Marlowe, Edward III, Beaumont and Fletcher, Middleton, Heywood, Ford, and the ubiquitous Anon. A lot of my items are not in scholarly journals but in collections that may not be available in many libraries or in JSTOR and Project MUSE. Also worth noting are Leslie’s important revisiting of the pass over the stage signal and her 2016 in depth treatment of the dumb show.

 

See the essay section of http://www.sddictionary.com/

 

A final note: Leslie’s book, Discoveries on the Early Modern Stage: Contexts and Conventions (2018), appears this month from Cambridge U.P.

 

Alan Dessen

 

 

 

Announcement: Online Dictionary of Stage Directions in English Drama, 1580-1642

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 29.0283  Wednesday, 22 August 2018

 

From:        Alan Dessen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         August 21, 2018 at 3:16:18 PM EDT

Subject:    Announcement: Online Dictionary of Stage Directions in English Drama, 1580-1642

 

Shortly after our Dictionary of Stage Directions in English Drama, 1580-1642 appeared in 1999, I set up a website where Leslie Thomson and I could provide some new entries and make a few corrections. More recently, we have added more than forty of our essays, most of them dealing with theatre history and/or staging. Included are essays on Greene, Marlowe, Edward III, Beaumont and Fletcher, Middleton, Heywood, Ford, and the ubiquitous Anon. A lot of my items are not in scholarly journals but in collections that may not be available in many libraries or in JSTOR and Project MUSE. Also worth noting are Leslie’s important revisiting of the pass over the stage signal and her 2016 in depth treatment of the dumb show.

 

See the essay section of http://www.sddictionary.com/

 

A final note: Leslie’s book, Discoveries on the Early Modern Stage: Contexts and Conventions (2018), appears this month from Cambridge U.P.

 

Alan Dessen

 

 

 

 

Plumer Visiting Fellowship

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 29.0281  Tuesday, 21 August 2018

 

From:        Robert Stagg <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         August 21, 2018 at 11:26:02 AM EDT

Subject:    Plumer Visiting Fellowship

 

Plumer Visiting Fellowship (1-3 months) 

In Early Modern English Literature

St Anne’s College, University of Oxford

 

St Anne’s College, Oxford welcomes applications for a new Plumer Visiting Fellowship in Early Modern English Literature, to be established in perpetuity. The Plumer Fellowship is a non-stipendiary research position designed for established academics (of any nationality and institution) who wish to be temporarily resident in Oxford. The fellowship is available at any time of year, though would preferably be taken up during an Oxford term, and can last anywhere from 1-3 months.

 

The Fellowship carries no responsibilities beyond giving one lecture in college during the duration of residence. While the fellowship carries no stipend, the college will provide five lunches and/or dinners per week, full free use of the University of Oxford’s libraries, shared office space, Senior Common Room membership (free tea and coffee, newspapers, journals), and free printing and photocopying facilities. Fellows will also be invited to attend formal college dinners and early modern seminars and lectures around the university. In addition, the college can sometimes provide accommodation at a substantially below-market rent. Fellows are asked to be resident in Oxford for the majority of their time in post.

 

Applications for the Fellowship are brief and easy; they consist of a CV and a short statement detailing the research the candidate wishes to undertake while in Oxford. Applications are now open for fellowships starting in or after January 2019. In the first instance, could interested parties please contact Dr Robert Stagg (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.) to discuss a possible application?

 

 

 

Local and Global Myths in Shakespearean Performance

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 29.0276  Friday, 17 August 2018

 

From:        Alexa Alice Joubin <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         August 16, 2018 at 4:24:08 PM EDT

Subject:    New Book: Local and Global Myths in Shakespearean Performance

 

Local and Global Myths in Shakespearean Performance

Edited by Aneta Mancewicz and Alexa Alice Joubin

In the Reproducing Shakespeare series

Palgrave Macmillan, 2018

 

“Contradictory myths are the foundation to many conversations about Shakespeare today. We can better grasp the significance of global Shakespeare by understanding the cultural logic of the production and consumption of these myths—often articulated in the form of journalistic adoration of universal aesthetics.” 

 

Drawing on a definition of myth as a powerful ideological narrative, this book examines historical, political, and cultural conditions of Shakespearean performances in Europe, Asia, and North and South America. 

 

The first part of this volume offers a theoretical introduction to Shakespeare as myth from a twenty-first century perspective. 

 

The second part critically evaluates myths of linguistic transcendence, authenticity, and universality within broader European, neo-liberal, and post-colonial contexts. 

 

The study of local identities and global icons in the third part uncovers dynamic relationships between regional, national, and transnational myths of Shakespeare. 

 

The fourth part revises persistent narratives concerning a political potential of Shakespeare’s plays in communist and post-communist countries. 

 

Finally, part five explores the influence of commercial and popular culture on Shakespeare myths. Michael Dobson’s Afterword concludes the volume by locating Shakespeare within classical mythology and contemporary concerns.

 

 

TABLE of CONTENTS   https://www.palgrave.com/gp/book/9783319898506

 

AMAZON link:    https://www.amazon.com/Global-Shakespearean-Performance-Reproducing-Shakespeare/dp/3319898507/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1534450365&sr=8-1&keywords=local+global+myth+shakespeare

 

This collection of scholarly essays offers a new understanding of local and global myths that have been constructed around Shakespeare in theatre, cinema, and television from the nineteenth century to the present. Drawing on a definition of myth as a powerful ideological narrative, Local and Global Myths in Shakespearean Performance examines historical, political, and cultural conditions of Shakespearean performances in Europe, Asia, and North and South America. The first part of this volume offers a theoretical introduction to Shakespeare as myth from a twenty-first century perspective. The second part critically evaluates myths of linguistic transcendence, authenticity, and universality within broader European, neo-liberal, and post-colonial contexts. The study of local identities and global icons in the third part uncovers dynamic relationships between regional, national, and transnational myths of Shakespeare. The fourth part revises persistent narratives concerning a political potential of Shakespeare’s plays in communist and post-communist countries. Finally, part five explores the influence of commercial and popular culture on Shakespeare myths. Michael Dobson’s Afterword concludes the volume by locating Shakespeare within classical mythology and contemporary concerns. 

 

 

 

CFP: 2019 Shakespearean Theatre Conference “Festival and Festivity”

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 29.0268  Monday, 6 August 2018

 

From:        Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         August 6, 2018 at 7:31:25 AM EDT

Subject:    CFP: 2019 Shakespearean Theatre Conference “Festival and Festivity”

 

Call for Papers 

2019 Shakespearean Theatre Conference

“Festival and Festivity”

 

We invite proposals for 20-minute papers, full sessions, and workshops for the third Shakespearean Theatre Conference, to be held June 20-22, 2019 in Stratford, Ontario.

 

While all approaches to Tudor-Stuart drama are welcome, we especially encourage proposals that respond to our broad theme of “festival and festivity.” How do we understand and perform festive, antic, celebratory, or bacchanal elements in the plays of Shakespeare and his contemporaries? How did these plays draw on and contribute to early modern festive cultures, and how have historical changes to such cultures shifted the meaning of theatrical revelry? To what extent is the festive limited or invigorated by genre and convention? In what ways do cultural and theatrical festivals, including dedicated Shakespeare festivals and Shakespearean playhouses, influence and shape contemporary Shakespearean performance? What do the histories of these festivals have to tell us about changing responses to early modern drama, and what new directions seem promising?  

 

Plenary Speakers:

Farah Karim-Cooper (Shakespeare’s Globe)

M. J. Kidnie (Western University)

Paul Prescott (University of Warwick)

 

The conference is a joint venture of the University of Waterloo and the Stratford Festival, and will bring together scholars and practitioners to talk about how performance influences scholarship and vice versa. Paper sessions will be held at the University of Waterloo’s Stratford campus, with plays and special events hosted by the Stratford Festival.

 

By February 1, 2019, please send proposals to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

 

Kenneth Graham - Department of English, University of Waterloo

Alysia Kolentsis - Department of English, St. Jerome's University

Lois Adamson - Director of Education, Stratford Festival

 

 

 

Armenian Shakespeare Association International Conference 2018

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 29.0266  Friday, 3 August 2018

 

From:        International Shakespeare Association <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         August 1, 2018 at 1:00:45 PM EDT

Subject:    Armenian Shakespeare Association International Conference 2018 

 

The 2nd ASA International Conference in Yerevan, Armenia 27-30th September 2018

“Shakespeare Between the Crossroads of East and West”

Dedicated to the 130th anniversary of the legendary actor Vahram Papazian (1888-1968)

CONFIRMED KEYNOTE SPEAKERS:
Pr. Jerzy Limon - Director of The Gdansk Shakespeare Theatre
Pr. Lisa Hopkins – Head of the Graduate School, Sheffield Hallam University

 

The Armenian Shakespeare Association (ASA) invites academics, research students, independent scholars, critics and theatre practitioners its second international conference in Yerevan. The conference is organised in partnership with the American University of Armenia (AUA) and the National Museum of Theatre and Literature (NMTL).  Rooms in a 3* centrally located hotel are reserved for participants with a special discount. ASA has also arranged sightseeing tours (to museums, historical and architectural sites) and evening entertainment each day of the conference. Additionally, participants will be able to join: 

 

  • Festive celebrations, including concerts, shows and exhibitions dedicated to the 2800th anniversary of the capital Erebuni at the end of September;
  • Performances at the International Theatre Festival HIFEST between the 1st and the 5th October. 

Participants are highly encouraged to organise their individual panels by registering their interest before the 30th May, and abstracts of around 300 words MUST be submitted via email before the 30th June.
 
Here are few panel topics, however further suggestions are most welcome: 

 

  • 2018 spotlight on Othello: global/local variations and their significance in adoptive countries;
  • Viewing and reviewing Shakespeare: the conference will watch current Shakespeare productions and organise discussions with the cast and creative teams;
  • Translating Shakespeare: linguistic, geographic and poetic challenges: translators of any language warmly welcome;
  • Shakespearean reworkings in cinematography, opera, classical and contemporary music, art, ballet;
  • Round table: teaching Shakespeare, why and how to engage the new generation of Shakespeareans.

 
For all inquiries contact: 
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.  
Registration form and conference fees: www.armenianshakespeare.org

 

 

 

Thanks to Associate Editor Stephanie Chamberlain

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 29.0265  Friday, 3 August 2018

 

From:        Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         Friday, August 3, 2018

Subject:    Thanks to Associate Editor Stephanie Chamberlain

 

Dear Subscribers:

 

I would to offer my profoundest thanks to Associate Editor Stephanie Chamberlain for spotting me to a July break. 

 

As readers have seen, Professor Chamberlain is an extremely competent editor, one in whom SHAKSPER will be in good hands when I give up daily operations in January 2020, SHAKSPER’s thirtieth year of service, to become Editor Emeritus. Then I will be available to repay Stephanie in kind and to pursue my other interests.

 

Regarding those other interests, Stephanie will be taking over again for a couple of weeks in September when I go on a jhana retreat with my friend and teacher Leigh Brasington. 

 

Thank you Stephanie.

 

Hardy

 

 

Call for Papers

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 29.0264  Wednesday, 1 August 2018

 

From:       Maite Alvarez <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:        August 1, 2018 at 11:08 AM EDT

Subject:    Call for Papers

 

Greetings,

 

We are hoping that you could post the following call for papers on the SHAKSPER feed as it may be of interest to some of your members.

 

All the best,

Maite Alvarez, Ph. D.

J. Paul Getty Museum

 

 ___________________________________________________________

CFP, CAA 2019 NYC:  Art and Materiality in the Age of Global Encounters, 1492-1800 

 

Chair: Maite Alvarez - J Paul Getty Museum
Chair: Charlene Villaseñor Black 
Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

In a royal decree dated 1564, King Philip II of Spain ordered his viceroys in the Americas to “safely bring to the realms gold, silver and cochineal,” an order that heralded profound changes in the global economy and art world. These materials arrived via Spain’s far-reaching trade networks, which by the 1550s extended to Asia, sub-Saharan Africa, Patagonia, the Yucatan Peninsula, and Chesapeake Bay, as well as throughout mainland Europe. The arrival of ships loaded with rich finds such as indigo, cochineal, brazilwood, silver, pearls, and emeralds into European ports presaged innovative artistic developments. New pigments, types of wood, and other unusual materials such as shells and feathers immediately and forever altered the landscape of European art, giving artists and patrons new and varied material choices. How did these finds, the result of European imperialism, impact global artistic developments? How does attention to materiality change understanding of aesthetics? What are the most useful frameworks for theorizing these developments, exchanges, and networks? While this panel investigates the prima materia, the very materiality of objects, it also moves beyond aesthetics to technical processes, trade and global exchange, as well as to the multiple societies where these works were created and collected. We welcome various approaches, from research inspired by conservation science or archival documentation to decolonial methodologies, material semiotics, Renaissance futurism, or thinking through the anthropocene.

Please send a 250 word abstract, cover letter, and shortened CV, no later than August 6, 2018. 

Announcement – Christy Desmet Memorial Service

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 29.0263  Tuesday, 31 July 2018

 

From:       Sujata Iyengar <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>       

Date:        July 31, 2018 at 8:02 AM EDT

Subject:    Announcement – Christy Desmet Memorial Service

 

ISC, Folger, SAA, ESRA, and Shaksper-ian colleagues might wish to know that there will be a secular memorial service for our late friend and colleague Christy Desmet on Friday, September 28th at the University of Georgia's Chapel at 4 pm, with a reception to follow on the patio of the UGA English Department, Park Hall.

 

Shakespeareans Alexa Joubin and Sujata Iyengar are also planning a more informal commemoration of Christy's life and work to take place in DC while many will be there for the SAA's annual meeting.

 

Please do share this information with your members, and, since there will be no traditional newspaper obituary, please also feel free to direct members to the attached tribute essay (also archived on the SAA website) if they feel they need more details about Christy or about her illness this summer.

 

https://www.facebook.com/notes/sujata-iyengar/in-honor-of-my-friend-colleague-co-author-and-co-editor-christy-desmet/412447649278272/?notif_id=1532841654206488&notif_t=feedback_reaction_generic

 

Regards,

 

Sujata

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