Announcements

Reacting to the Past

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 29.0169  Monday, 9 April 2018

 

From:        Paul Hamilton <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         April 9, 2018 at 4:13:11 AM EDT

Subject:    Reacting to the Past

 

https://kingstonshakespeareseminar.wordpress.com/2018/03/26/cfp-little-stars-and-galloping-steeds-sex-in-shakespeare-june-22-kissit/

 

 

Little Stars and Galloping Steeds:
Sex in Shakespeare

 

Kingston Shakespeare Seminar in Theory Conference

 

June 22, 2018, Rose Theatre, London.

 

10am – 6:30pm.

 

Confirmed Plenary speaker: Jonathan Dollimore

 

 

Call for Papers:

 

There is a lot of sex in Shakespeare. Some characters have sex, some brag about having it, and some do everything in their power to shun it. Some of the sex is consensual, much of it is rapacious. There is sexuality between men and women, men and men, women and women, people and animals, and people and gods. The very definition of comedy, as a genre, hinges on the sexual act.

 

Sex is also about political power. It is used to enforce gender, class, and ethnic categories through disavowal, demonisation, and displacement. However, as Jonathan Dollimore observes in Sexual Dissidence, sex can also be a form of dissident knowledge. For deviance is disobedience. As the cross-dressing Rosalind says in As You Like It, “the wiser the waywarder”! Through what Dollimore calls “the perverse dynamic”, the sexual dissident can discover the displaced Other at the very heart of the authority that attempts to disavow it.

 

For this conference, we are calling for an investigation of the role of sex and sexuality, in its political, figurative, and theatrical sense, in Shakespeare’s plays. Papers could unblushingly peer into Shakespeare’s plays and poems and perform a close-viewing of their sexuality. We welcome papers that set the sexuality in the plays’ historical period as well as papers that read the sexuality as a means to critique our present moment. We welcome papers that read the sexuality through a preferred theoretical lens; Feminism, Psychoanalysis and Queer Theory are good fits, but what about Marxism, Eco-criticism, and, well, the animal turn.

 

 

Possible topics:

  • What is the role of sexual desire and pleasure in Shakespeare’s plays and poems?
  • What can be said about Shakespeare’s ambiguity as to whether certain characters actually have sex (Bottom and Titania, for example)?
  • How have directors staged sex in Shakespeare performances?
  • What is the role of sexual refusal in the plays and poems?
  • How is sex weaponised or used in power moves such as rape (Lavinia, Lucrece), or through manipulation (Richard and Anne, Henry V and Katherine)?
  • What is the relationship between sex and court or state power?
  • What is the role of sexual deviance and perversion in the plays and poems?
  • How does the sex act of the bed trick work hermeneutically?
  • How can we read Shakespeare‘s allusions to varies types of sex acts – intercourse, oral sex, anal sex – and different parts of the sex act – wooing, orgasm, post-coitus?
  • What qualities of sex are found in Shakespeare – phallic-centred, female-centered, rapacious, BDSM, polymorphous perverse?
  • What role does sexuality play in the plays’ queer relations, in their rainbow of forms – open, mistaken, ambiguous, closeted, sublimated?
  • What role is sexual allusion playing when it is deployed by Shakespeare in violence – Samson‘s and Gregory‘s opening dialogue in Romeo and Juliet, Macbeth‘s dagger speech (2.1.33-64)?
  • What role do the sexual acts of prostitutes play in the plays?
  • How can incest be read in, say, Pericles and Hamlet?
  • How does it change the reading of a play if it is assumed that certain characters – say, Hamlet and Ophelia, Demetrius and Helena, the poet and the fair youth – have already had sex before the opening of the play/poem?
  • What role does sex play in Classical allusions – Ovid, Homer, Apuleius – in the plays and poems?

 

Please send paper proposals/abstracts to the conference organisers:
 Christian Smith and Paul Hamilton by April 20, 2018.

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

 

 

Shakespeare and Fear -- and a Question Concerning Cleopatra

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 29.0168  Monday, 9 April 2018

 

From:        Robert Appelbaum <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         April 6, 2018 at 10:58:48 AM EDT

Subject:    Shakespeare and Fear -- and a Question Concerning Cleopatra

 

Dear All,

 

I would like to call attention to a new online publication by the Société Francaise Shakespeare, Shakespeare et la peur

Shakespeare and Fear. https://journals.openedition.org/shakespeare/4002 

 

Most of the entries are in English.

 

And now here’s my question. In Antony and Cleopatra, Cleopatra worries about being led ‘in triumph’ before the people of Rome. A similar well-known story, about Sophonisba, has the main character worry about the same thing. Surely, to be led in a cage in front of the public would be humiliating. But what would happen next? I have not been able to find out. Would it possibly have been the case that after being led in triumph the woman would have been made into a slave, and prostituted? And if so, is that not the real scandal involved, however occluded?

 

Just asking.

 

Cheers,

Robert Appelbaum

Professor of English Literature

Uppsala University

 

 

 

CFP: Essay Collection: What’s Missing in Shakespeare?

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 29.0166  Thursday, 5 April 2018

 

From:        Darlene Farabee <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         April 3, 2018 at 5:31:17 PM EDT

Subject:    CFP: Essay Collection: What’s Missing in Shakespeare?

 

Essay Collection: What’s Missing in Shakespeare?

Co-edited by Darlene Farabee (University of South Dakota) and Brett Gamboa (Dartmouth College)

 

Shakespeare’s plays are often complicated by what they lack. Key characters go missing from scenes or drop out of the action entirely; absent characters exert influence over those onstage; mislaid or immaterial objects are pivotal to the resolutions of plots; urgent questions are settled through silences; and plays are frequently haunted by untaken roads or abandoned plot threads. In addition, contemporary performances are shaped significantly by cuts to the script, with some scenes or characters rarely realized in performance, and some plays rarely performed at all.

 

We invite contributions for a peer-reviewed essay collection on the value of what goes missing on Shakespeare’s stage. We envision a collection mainly focused on performance, mingling historically situated analyses and readings of the plays through contemporary theoretical concerns. Contributors might explore the foregoing (or related) topics through a variety of critical approaches, including editorial and textual studies, object-oriented ontology or actor-network theory, cultural studies and canonicity, cognitive and reception theories, genre studies, or attention to contemporary staging. Additional topics of inquiry might include:

 

                  -- deletions from or changes to source materials

                  -- generic irresolution

                  -- reported action, or ‘scenes’ occurring offstage

                  -- omissions from contemporary or period accounts of performance

                  -- syntactical omissions or elisions

                  -- absences brought on by representational limits (horses, weather, landscapes, etc.)

                  -- gaps in time or multiple time schemes

 

Please send abstracts of about 250 words (for essays of 5000-6000 words in length) and a brief c.v. to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. and This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. by no later than June 3, 2018. Please do not hesitate to contact us with any questions about individual topics or the volume as a whole.

 

 

 

The Factory’s Macbeth: Sunday 8th at Electricity Showrooms

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 29.0165  Tuesday, 3 April 2018

 

From:         The Factory Theatre Company <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:          March 28, 2018 at 10:48:07 AM EDT

Subject: The Factory’s Macbeth: Sunday 8th at Electricity Showrooms 

 

The Factory’s Macbeth.

 

An audience affected, underground, guerrilla theatre experiment.

 

No set, no props, no costume, no blocking, no fixed venue.

 

Shifting, genderless, ageless, typeless casting.

 

Different every time.

 

Next performance:

Sun. April 8th - 6pm

Electricity Showrooms (Downstairs) 

£10 (+processing fee)

 

Bar open pre-show and after until midnight

 

 

 

Book Tickets

 

 

The Factory has always striven to make work that thrives on liveness, spontaneity, and risk. Its newest experiment is no exception.

 

We want you to play the Witches.

 

No acting experience required. The button below will take you to the script with some simple instructions. Just learn the lines and cues, follow the instructions and go for it. 

 

The red lines should be said by everyone collectively when the cue comes.

 

The blue lines are to be said by individual audience members. Email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. and we will give you the numbers of the lines you need to learn. 

 

It is absolutely acceptable to buy a ticket and not say a word. However, we know from experience how liberating it can be to do something unplanned and unusual in front of a large group of people. What have you got to lose? Join us, and join in.

 

 

Witches Text

 

 

PROP NOTE: All we need for this is 2 or 3 new, unopened boxes of nude, 30 denier tights, and some scissors. Thank you.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Directed by Artistic Director Alex Hassell, Macbeth is The Factory’s first major Shakespeare experiment since Hamlet and employs a shifting cast of players, all of whom have been cast with no regard for their gender, age, or physical type.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thanks to Stephanie

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 29.0164  Tuesday, 3 April 2018

 

From:        Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         Tuesday, April 3, 2018

Subject:    Thanks to Stephanie

 

Dear Subscribers:

 

For the past month or so, Stephanie Chamberlain, SHAKSPER’s Associate Editor, has been doing all of the editing. 

 

Stephanie has been such a quick learner and she has been very easy to instruct in the intricacies of Joomla and my OCD approach to editing SHAKSPER so much so that I am sure that many of you have not even discerned the change. 

 

I have now returned from my retreats in Central Massachusetts and am resuming editing of SHAKSPER.

 

Let us all thank Stephanie for her service to SHAKSPER and for filling in for me while I was away.

 

Thank you Stephanie. 

 

Best wishes,

Hardy

 

 

 

Announcement - BSA

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 29.0159  Tuesday, 20 March 2018

 

From:        British Shakespeare Association via British Shakespeare 

                 Association <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         March 20, 2018

Subject:    Announcement - BSA

Dear BSA members and friends,


The conference website (with further population in due course) is now up and running. You will find here the information you need on registration, accommodation and travel. 

The website is at http ://www . qub . ac . uk/sites/bsa2018/. Click Ctrl + Click to follow link or paste into your browser. Please go ahead and register for the conference. 

There is an early bird rate of £140. This changes to £180 from 2 April. The rate for unwaged/PGR is £90. If you are in receipt of a conference bursary (in which case you will already have had an email about this), please register using the final option on the list ('Conference Fee for delegates in receipt of bursary'). 

The conference dinner (at the Titanic Attraction, Belfast) can be booked when registering and is available at a discounted rate of £40 per head. This includes a four-course dinner in the first-class dining room at Titanic Belfast, a prosecco reception and glass of wine!

You can book discounted accommodation on the website as well. 

You must be a member of the BSA or have applied for BSA membership to participate in the conference. If you are not a member, you can join at the British Shakespeare Association website, http ://www . britishshakespeare . ws/. Click Ctrl + Click to follow link or paste into your browser.

The programme will be available soon. For the purposes of travel, please note the conference begins on Thursday, 14 June at 2:00 pm and ends on Sunday, 17 June at lunchtime. 

We look forward to seeing you!

All good wishes, 
On behalf of the Steering Committee 
BSA Belfast

 

Announcement - Publication

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 29.0159  Tuesday, 20 March 2018

 

From:        Evelyn Gajowski <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         March 19, 2018

Subject:    Announcement - Publication

 

Dear Fellow SHAKSPER Member, 

 

I’m pleased to announce the upcoming publication of the next title in the Arden Shakespeare and Theory Series:  

 

          Karen Raber. Shakespeare and Posthumanist Theory. Arden

          Shakespeare and Theory Series. London: Arden/Bloomsbury. 5

 April 2018. ISBN 9781474234436.

 

 https://www.bloomsbury.com/us/shakespeare-and-posthumanist-  theory-9781474234436/

 

https://www.amazon.com/Shakespeare-Posthumanist-theory/dp/1474234437/ref=sr_1_7?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1521518678&sr=1-7&keywords=karen+raber

 

This title is currently available for pre-order. If you would consider ordering it for your campus library, your courses, and/or yourself, I would be grateful. FYI, podcast interviews with Series authors are accessible at http://blogs.surrey.ac.uk/shakespeare/ (podcast interviews #21 - #32). 

 

All the best,

Evelyn Gajowski, Series Editor

Arden Shakespeare and Theory Series

Announcement – MIT Global Shakespeares

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 29.0159  Tuesday, 20 March 2018

 

From:        Alexa Alice Joubin <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         March 17, 2018

Subject:    Announcement – MIT Global Shakespeares

 

The MIT Global Shakespeares, a collaborative project providing free online access to performances of Shakespeare from many parts of the world, will be at the SAA this year. 

 

For those attending the upcoming Shakespeare Association of America meeting in Los Angeles, Cris Busato Smith and Alexa Alice Joubin will demo the new user interface at:

 

Digital Exhibits

 

10:00 AM -- 1:30 PM, Thursday 29 March

Westin Bonaventure Hotel, Los Angeles

 

 

Announcement – REED

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 29.0158  Saturday, 17 March 2018

 

From:        Sally-Beth MacLean < This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         March 16, 2018

Subject:    Announcement – REED

 

REED is pleased to announce the relaunch of its Early Modern London Theatres (EMLoT) website, now hosted by the University of Toronto Libraries at a new url: https://emlot.library.utoronto.ca. Those visiting the original site hosted by the King’s College London Digital Lab will be automatically redirected.

 

We are equally delighted to launch the newly edited Globe Theatre data at the same time. Special thanks go to EMLoT bibliographer Tanya Hagen and associate editor John Estabillo for their fine work on the extensive Globe data and to our developer, Jamie Norrish, whose expertise was essential for the upgrade and transfer of the data to the new server.

 

We also want to express our gratitude to The British Academy and the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada for their support of the EMLoT project.

 

For those attending the upcoming Shakespeare Association of America meeting at the end of this month, John Estabillo will be featured at the following event:

 

Digital Exhibits

10:00AM - 1:30PM, Thursday 29 March

Location: Sacramento Room, Westin Bonaventure Hotel, Los Angeles

 

The Records of Early English Drama: Launching REED Online and the Globe for Early Modern London Theatres

 

Announcement – Speaking of Shakespeare

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 29.0158  Saturday, 17 March 2018

 

From:        John F. Andrews <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         March 15, 2018

Subject:    Announcement – Speaking of Shakespeare

 

Speaking of Shakespeare

with Director Jesse Berger

 

Tuesday, March 20 at 7 p.m.

The Players

16 Gramercy Park South, NYC

Free, and Open to the Public

 

As founding director of Red Bull Theater, a company that performs in the West Village and draws its name from a London playhouse that was created around 1600, Jesse Berger has produced such Jacobean mainstays as Edward IIPericlesThe Revenger’s TragedyVolponeThe Witch of Edmonton, and Women Beware Women. His scripts for two of these classics have been published by Dramatists Play Service. Red Bull offers a variety of innovative programs, among them a Revelation Readings series that has been honored with a coveted Obie Award. Mr. Berger has worked with artists like F. Murray Abraham, Elizabeth Ashley, Michael Learned, Kelly McGillis, Patrick Stewart, and Michael Urie.

 

Speaking of Shakespeare

with Director Nagle Jackson

 

Wednesday, March 21 at 8 p.m.

National Arts Club

15 Gramercy Park South, NYC

Free, and Open to the Public

 

Not only has he distinguished himself on Broadway and at the Kennedy Center; Nagle Jackson was the first American to direct in the Soviet Union. As a producer, he has earned plaudits at the Milwaukee Repertory Theatre (1970-76) and the McCarter Theatre in Princeton (1979-90), recipient of a regional Tony Award. Mr. Jackson began his career at the Oregon Shakespeare Festival and proceeded to the Hartford Stage Company, the Seattle Repertory Company, San Diego’s Old Globe Theatre, and San Francisco’s American Conservatory Theatre. Mr. Jackson is also a widely-recognized playwright, and actor whose roles have included Autolycus, Bertram, Demetrius, Feste, Lucio, and Octavius.

 

To reserve for these conversations, which will be hosted by Shakespeare Guild president John Andrews, email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. And to learn about other Guild offerings, including upcoming NAC engagements with Edward Tenner (April 18) and New Yorker favorite Adam Gopnik, (June 14), visit www.shakesguild.org.  

 

Hiatus—Not!

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 29.0157  Wednesday, 14 March 2018

 

From:        Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         Tuesday, March 13, 2018

Subject:    Hiatus—Not!

 

Dear Subscribers:

 

You may not have noticed, but for the past week and a half or so, Stephanie Chamberlain, SHAKSPER’s Associate Editor, has been doing all of the editing. 

 

Stephanie has been such a quick learner and she has been very easy to instruct in the intricacies of Joomla and my OCD approach to editing SHAKSPER, so much so that her editing has been transparent. I am sure that many of you have not even discerned the change. 

 

I planned to return to the editing this week; but, at the last minute, there was a cancellation in a retreat that I had registered for with Bhikkhu Analayo for which I was wait-listed but did not think I would get in. But I have. Analayo’s retreat is back-to-back with another retreat I am attending with Santikaro, who studied with Buddhadassa, the Thai Forest monk who turned Theravada orthodoxy regarding Dependent Arising on its head and thus remains one of my heroes. 

 

So, I leave for central Massachusetts early Thursday morning and return at the end of March, just in time for my puppy Orlando’s second birthday (named after my first Westie and his spiritual older brother Oliver—hint AYLI)

 

Stephanie will continue editing until I return and resume the first week of April.

 

Wish Stephanie well as she continues to do such a terrific job for all.

 

Best wishes,

 

Hardy

 

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