Announcements

CFP: Computational Methods for Literary-Historical Textual Studies

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 29.0125 Thursday, 8 February 2018

 

From:        Gabriel Egan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         February 7, 2018 at 1:59:13 PM EST

Subject:    Call for Papers: Computational Methods for Literary-Historical Textual Studies

 

Dear SHAKSPERians

 

Conference: Computational Methods for Literary-Historical Textual Studies. 3-5 July 2018 atDe Montfort University

 

The Centre for Textual Studies at De Montfort University in Leicester, England, is running a three-day international conference to showcase and explore the latest methods for analyzing literary and historical texts using computers. A particular focus will be the ways in which literary and historical scholarship will turn increasingly algorithmic in the future as we invent wholly new kinds of questions to ask of our texts because we have wholly new ways to investigate them. The conference will bring together, and put into fruitful dialogue, scholars using traditional literary and historical methods and those exploring and inventing new computational methods, to their mutual benefit.

 

Proposals are invited for 20-minute papers on our topic, which might cover such matters as:

 

* More markup or smarter algorithms?: The future of text analysis.

 

* Is anything just not computable in literary-historical textual studies, and does it matter?

 

* Where are we with Optical Character Recognition?

 

* Are texts Orderly Hierarchies of Content Objects, really?

 

* Can (should?) one person try to learn traditional and digital methods of textual scholarship?

 

* XML but not TEI: Using roll-your-own schemas

 

* New developments in Natural Language Processing

 

* Regularizing historical spelling variation: Is it necessary? How can we do it?

 

* Getting started with digital textual analysis: Reports from unwearied beginners

 

* Is it too easy to get results with computers and too hard to avoid big errors?

 

* Teaching textual analysis using computers

 

* Does it matter if non-computational colleagues don't understand our work?

 

* Showcasing new technologies

 

* Is digital practice changing textual theories?

 

* When is a source text digital transcription good enough?

 

* Teamwork versus lone scholarship: Does working digitally make a difference?

 

* Where does textual analysis meet digital editing?

 

The conference is generously funded by the UK’s Arts and Humanities Research Council, which includes the provision of eight student bursaries, worth 200 GBP each, to help cover the costs of attending to give a paper.  Students wanting to apply for bursaries should indicate so in the paper proposal.

 

To apply to give a paper, please send the title of the paper and a description (200-300 words) to Prof Gabriel Egan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>. If you are a student applying for one of the bursaries, please say so in your proposal and add a couple of sentences describing your circumstances in a way that makes us want to give you the bursary.

 

Regards

Gabriel Egan

De Montfort University. www.gabrielegan.com

Director of the Centre for Textual Studies http://cts.dmu.ac.uk

National Teaching Fellow http://www.heacademy.ac.uk/ntfs

Gen. Ed. New Oxford Shakespeare http://www.oxfordpresents.com/ms/nos

 

 

 

Shakespeare in Prison Conference

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 29.0124 Wednesday, 7 February 2018

 

From:        Curt L. Tofteland <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         February 7, 2018 at 9:17:12 AM EST

Subject:    Shakespeare in Prison Conference

 

The Old Globe Theatre in San Diego is hosting our 3rd International Shakespeare in Prison Conference March 22-25, 2018.

 

3rd International Shakespeare in Prison Conference

 

SiPC offers arts practitioners the opportunity to share their collective experiences working with incarcerated and post-incarcerated populations; rejuvenate passion; renew commitment for their vocation; and build upon their expanding network of peers.

 

1. REGISTRATION!

 

https://www.theoldglobe.org/edp-pages/2018/shakespeare-in-prisons-conference/

 

2. BOOK YOUR HOTEL.

 

Rooms and rates are now extended through February 22, 2018. Reserve your room at the historic Lafayette Hotel for the special Shakespeare in Prisons Conference rate of just $99/night. Call ASAP as rooms at this hotel go fast. Call (619) 296-2101 to guarantee your reservation, or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

 

3. GUESS WHO'S COMING TO SiPC!

 

Renowned Scholars Peter Holland, University of Notre Dame, Sarah Beckwith, Duke University, Larry Brewster, University of San Francisco, and Michael Balfour, Griffith University (Qeensland, Australia), will make presentations; Famed performers Liza Jessie Petersen (13th) and Lisa Wolpe (Shakespeare and the Alchemy of Gender) will perform; Alokananda Roy from India (Love Therapy in My Second Home), Zein Daccache from Lebanon (Scheherzade’s Diary), and Marina Kivacevic & Dubravka Radusinovic from Serbia (Notes from the Cell Number 12 Center) will be each screen their documentaries; Prison Arts Practitioners and returning citizens from around the world will be onsite to share their amazing work with incarcerated populations. Find out who else and what else here.

 

Have questions? Feel free to email us at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.!

 

Curt L. Tofteland | Founder & Producing Artistic Director |

Shakespeare Behind Bars, Inc. | 616.402.6281 |

Post Office Box 83 Macatawa, Michigan 49434 |

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. |

www.shakespearebehindbars.org |

 

The Mission of Shakespeare Behind Bars is to offer theatrical encounters with personal and social issues to the incarcerated, allowing them to develop life skills that will ensure their successful reintegration into society.

 

 

 

Call for Submissions: Auditory Worlds: Hearing on Shakespearean Stages

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 29.0122 Tuesday, 6 February 2018

 

From:        Walter Cannon <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         February 5, 2018 at 2:15:12 PM EST

Subject:    Call for Submissions: Auditory Worlds: Hearing on Shakespearean Stages

 

Call for Submissions: Auditory Worlds: Hearing on Shakespearean Stages

As a follow-up to our 2012 volume, Who Hears in Shakespeare? Auditory Worlds on Stage and Screen (FDU Press), Laury Magnus and Walter Cannon are designing a volume that will explore the theatrical intelligibility of Shakespeare’s multifaceted soundscapes on original stages as well as post-Restoration to modern stages.

We introduced Who Hears in Shakespeare? by giving an overview of the rich dimensions of “Shakespeare’s Auditory Worlds,” discussing both the explicit and the implicit, subtle, and often ambiguous byways of hearing; we examined the ways in which Shakespeare’s characters listen to and hear each other, as well as how their hearing, overhearing, eavesdropping, and whispering “creates a rich meta-theatrical soundscape” designed both to acknowledge and develop a sophisticated awareness of the audience as part of the production.

In the proposed volume, we and our contributors will expand on prior topics of mishearing and “hearing in disguise” and introduce new materials concerning the multifaceted relationships between sound and sight; in addition, contributors’ essays will examine special listening situations created not just by dialogue and blocking, but by the use of dialects and other languages (Kate's French or Glendower’s Welsh, for example), as well as by music and other non-dialogic sounds. The topics for which we would welcome submissions are as follows:

I-Hearing and Seeing/ Hearing Versus Seeing on Shakespeare’s Stages and in later staging incarnations


II. Hearing Gone Awry: Mishearing and Not Hearing


III   Hearing in Hiding (Disguise, Overhearing, Eavesdropping: Further Meditations)


IV   Shakespeare’s Soundings and Music: Trumpet blasts, clocks, bells cries, fanfares, drums, songs and dances.

If you would be interested in any of these topics, please let us know in a “reply to all” and give us a working title and an abstract of about two pages describing what you would like to do by March 1. We would like to have a good sense of the individual essays selected for inclusion by April 30 and will let writers know by that date.  The deadline for completed chapter submissions is July 31.

 

If you have any questions, please contact us.

Walter Cannon
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Laury Magnus
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

 

CFP: 20th Annual British Graduate Shakespeare Conference

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 29.0121 Tuesday, 6 February 2018

 

From:        BritGrad <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         February 3, 2018 at 1:17:31 PM EST

Subject:    CFP: 20th Annual British Graduate Shakespeare Conference

 

BritGrad

The 20th Annual British Graduate Shakespeare Conference

For graduate students, by graduate students

31 May – 2 June 2018

 

We invite graduate students with interests in Shakespeare, Renaissance, and Early Modern Studies to submit paper proposals for the 20th Annual British Graduate Shakespeare Conference (BritGrad).

 

This interdisciplinary conference provides a friendly and stimulating academic forum in which graduate students from all over the world can present their research and meet together in an active centre of Shakespeare research: Shakespeare’s hometown of Stratford-upon-Avon. Attendees will also have the opportunity to attend the RSC production of King Lear, directed by Gregory Doran, at a group-booking price. Lunch will be provided each day, and there will be a party and reception for attendees. Please check our website for upcoming announcements of plenary speakers as they are confirmed.

 

We welcome abstracts of up to 200 words proposing papers 20 minutes in length onsubjects relating to Shakespeare, Early Modern, and/or Renaissance Studies. We accept papers in any discipline which intersects with the above fields (including, but not limited to, literature, history, drama and performance, art, music, politics, and cultural studies). We also accept creative forms of criticism, such as original writing or performance, for which a 200 word abstract should also be submitted. For the first time we’re also accepting proposals for panels. Panels should be made up of three papers, each 20 minutes in length, and a 200 word abstract is required for each. If you feel you have something suitable that doesn’t fit into the above categories please do get in touch with us. In the conference’s 20th anniversary year we’re keen to explore the field as widely as possible, and, as a result of this, we’re offering a number of conference bursaries in areas which have been underrepresented at BritGrad (details below). Undergraduate students in their final two years of study are invited to attend the conference as auditors (non-speakers).

 

Deadline for Paper Proposals: 23:59 GMT on 21 March 2018, to be submitted via the email address below. BritGrad awards an annual abstract prize. All accepted abstracts will be considered for the prize.

 

Presenters will be notified of acceptance in time to register by 21 April and secure any necessary visas. Auditors are encouraged to register by 19 May for early-bird pricing. Due to the growing success of this annual conference, we strongly encourage early registration to ensure a place on the conference programme.

 

For more information you can find us on Facebook and Twitter, and explore this website. Our email address is This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.; please don’t hesitate to get in touch if you have any questions.

 

 

BritGrad Bursaries and Prizes

 

Conference Bursaries


Due to generous support from The Society for Renaissance Studies, we’re pleased to be able to offer five bursaries to cover conference fees for delegates presenting papers related to Shakespeare’s contemporaries. Priority will be given to applicants attending the entire conference. If you feel your paper should be considered for one of these bursaries, please indicate in your submission. Successful applicants will be informed alongside confirmation of acceptance.

 

Travel Bursaries


The Liz Ketterer Trust offers travel bursaries for delegates attending BritGrad. Four awards are available this year: two of £50 for delegates travelling within the UK, one of £100 for a delegate travelling within the rest of the EU, and one of £200 for a student traveling from outside of the EU. Delegates must attend all three days of the conference to be eligible. These bursaries are administrated by the Trust, and applications will open at the same time as registration.

 

Abstract Prize


Every year BritGrad awards prizes for the best abstracts, with the winner being awarded £100. All accepted abstracts are put forward for the award.

 

 

 

2018 Shakespeare in Prisons Conference

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 29.0120 Tuesday, 6 February 2018

 

From:        Scott Jackson <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         February 2, 2018 at 4:05:16 PM EST

Subject:    2018 Shakespeare in Prisons Conference

 

Third International Shakespeare in Prisons Conference

March 22-25, 2018

The Old Globe Theatre 

San Diego, CA

 

REGISTER: https://www.theoldglobe.org/edp-pages/2018/shakespeare-in-prisons-conference/

 

Friends:

 

It is my distinct honor to invite you to the 2018 Shakespeare in Prisons Conference (SiPC) at San Diego's Old Globe Theatre from March 22-25, 2018.  

 

This third iteration of the SiPC is the first to travel away from the University of Notre Dame, and we are hoping that the proximity to this year’s SAA in Los Angeles the following week (3/28-3/31) might tempt a few of our interested friends to join us a bit farther south to participate in an exceptional event that highlights the power of Shakespeare and the theatre arts to effect positive social change.

 

The SiPC offers prison arts practitioners the opportunity to share their collective experiences working with incarcerated and post-incarcerated populations, rejuvenate passion, renew commitment for their vocation, and build upon their expanding network of peers.

 

Artists and educators engaged in transformational arts programs using Shakespeare in prisons around the world are brought together to explore and study the effects arts programming has on prison populations and beyond. The SiPC promotes a collaborative learning forum that exposes participants to a diverse array of programs that all strive for a common result: the habilitation of the prisoner’s mind, heart, body, and spirit.

 

We welcome your voice in this conversation.

  • Register before February 6 and pay only $225. Use promo code SIPC18 to receive your discount.
  • After February 6, the regular attendance fee is $275.

The Shakespeare in Prisons Conference registration fee includes three meals a day for three days in addition to entrance to all conference events and activities.

 

Please don’t hesitate to contact me directly at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. with any questions about the SiPC.

 

Yours--

Scott Jackson

Mary Irene Ryan Family Executive Director

Shakespeare at Notre Dame

230 DeBartolo Performing Arts Center

Notre Dame, IN 46556

574-631-1563

shakespeare.nd.edu

 

 

 

Public Booking is Now Open for #Globe2018

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 29.019 Monday, 5 February 2018

 

From:        Hardy Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         February 2, 2018 at 12:57:07 PM EST

Subject:    Public Booking is Now Open for #Globe2018

 

Public booking now open for our Summer Season.

 

Michelle Terry’s inaugural season continues our radical theatrical experiment, building on past achievements and exploring new directions.

 

Join us, under the stars or sun (or rain), or by candlelight, in our two beautiful theatres, in our exhibition, in our workshops, on the road, online, or wherever else we might meet you this year.

 

http://www.shakespearesglobe.com/whats-on/d/2018-04-25:2018-12-31?utm_source=wordfly&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=MGPublicbooking(29Jan)&utm_content=version_A

 

Hamlet

From 25 April

 

Shakespeare Within the Abbey

From 26 April

 

Guided Tours & Exhibition

Open all year round 

 

Sonnet Walks 
Sweet Love Remember’d

From 28 April

 

As You Like It

From 2 May

 

Twelfth Night

From 7 May

 

Hamlet 
Introductory Talk

From 8 May

 

The British Academy Lecture

From 10 May

 

The Taming of the Shrew

From 11 May

 

Eastward Ho!

From 13 May

 

Eastward Ho! 
Rarely Played

From 13 May

 

The Merchant of Venice

From 14 May

 

Staging Milton’s Paradise Lost

From 14 May

 

Staging Milton’s Paradise Lost

From 14 May

 

Voter's Choice

From 18 May

 

 

 

Speaking of Shakespeare with Keith Baxter

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 29.016 Tuesday, 30 January 2018

 

From:        John F. Andrews <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         January 29, 2018 at 4:08:17 PM EST

Subject:    Speaking of Shakespeare with Keith Baxter

 

Speaking of Shakespeare with Keith Baxter

 

Thursday, February 1, at 12:15 p.m.

Woman’s National Democratic Club

1526 New Hampshire Avenue NW in DC

Luncheon and Program $30

For Reservations, call 202-232–7363

 

Best known to most of us as the actor who depicted Prince Hal in “Chimes at Midnight,” the 1966 Orson Welles classic in which the filmmaker portrayed Falstaff and Sir John Gielgud played Henry IV, Keith Baxter is now at the Shakespeare Theatre Company in Washington, where he is charming audiences as the Ghost, the Player King, and the Gravedigger. Mr. Baxter will talk about those and other memorable roles with John Andrews during a luncheon conversation near Dupont Circle in Washington.

 

John F. Andrews, President

The Shakespeare Guild

14 Via San Martin

Santa Fe, NM 87506

www.shakesguild.org

1-505-988-9560 (Home, Office)

1-505-670-9815 (iPhone)

 

 

 

Shakespeare in Practice 2018

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 29.014 Monday, 209 January 2018

 

From:        Hardy Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         January 26, 2018 at 8:08:32 AM EST

Subject:    Shakespeare in Practice 2018

 

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/shakespeare-in-practice-2018-tickets-42561177628

 

Shakespeare in Practice 2018

 

A Free One-Day Conference on the study of Shakespeare in Performance

 

University of Central Lancashire, Preston

Media Factory Innovation Studio

University of Central Lancashire

Preston

PR1 2HE

United Kingdom

 

14th April 2018

10.30 – 5pm

 

Confirmed Speakers: Andrew James Hartley, Kathryn Prince, Alexa Alice Joubin, Stephen Purcell, Darren Tunstall, Peter Kirwan, Theresa Saxon, Bridget Escolme and Stuart Hampton-Reeves

 

Sponsored by Shakespeare Bulletin

 

Call for Papers

The Shakespeare in Practice network launched in 2008 to bring together scholars developing performance-based approaches to the study of Shakespeare. To mark our tenth anniversary, and to celebrate the latest volumes in the Palgrave book series Shakespeare in Practice, we invite all scholars working on the study of Shakespeare in performance to submit proposals for short papers and non-paper presentation formats (15 minutes) on any aspect of the subject. We are particularly interested in new and daring approaches to performing Shakespeare, as well as issues facing contemporary theatre such as non-directed Shakespeare, immersive performance and digital theatre. Proposals offering new insights into theatre history in relation to Shakespeare are also welcome, as are papers on any of Shakespeare’s contemporaries in performance. To submit a paper, please send a 200-word abstract to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. by 28th February.

 

Registration is open now at: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/shakespeare-in-practice-2018-tickets-42561177628

 

More news and updates about the conference will be on our Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/events/146521912810236/

 

 

 

Shakespeare in Italy Summer School

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 29.011 Wednesday, 24 January 2018

 

From:        Kristin Backert <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         January 21, 2018 at 9:39:12 PM EST

Subject:    Shakespeare in Italy Summer School

 

I’m contacting you with information about Shakespeare in Italy’s 4th international summer school. This year it will take place in the beautiful seaside town of Pizzo Calabro in Calabria on the toe of Italy. The dates are May 19th – June 2nd.

 

Our three tutors are well known UK based Shakespearean actors / directors. Jane Wymark will lead sessions on Much Ado About Nothing, Dame Janet Suzman will work on Antony & Cleopatra and Michael Pennington on The Winter’s Tale.

 

The course is open to all who have a love of Shakespeare and speak English. Some like to stand up and put scenes on their feet while others prefer to watch and comment from the comfort of their seats.

Participants on our former courses have come from Australia, Canada, New Zealand, the UK, the USA, Italy, Holland, Switzerland and France. Their ages have ranged from 19 – 93.

This year Reg Grouse is returning from Melbourne, Australia aged 96 – the power of Shakespeare!

 

I’d be most grateful if you could spread the word about our course with your people and look forward to hearing from you with any questions you may have. There’s more info on the website and I’ve attached the pdf.

 

Shakespeare in Italy Summer School Broshure  pdf pdf (2.34 MB)  

 

The last 3 summer schools have been a blast – this one promises to be even better by the sea in Calabria.

With many thanks, 

Mary Chater

www.shakespeareinitaly.eu

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. +44 (0)1424 254540

 

 

 

John Barton Dies at 89

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 29.010  Wednesday, 24 January 2018

 

[1] From:        Hardy M. Cook < This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. >

     Date:         January 20, 2018 at 8:24:06 AM EST

     Subj:         John Barton Dies at 89

 

[2] From:        Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

     Date:         January 23, 2018 at 8:21:10 AM EST

     Subj:         John Barton Is Dead at 89

 

 

[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------

From:        Hardy M. Cook < This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. >

Date:         January 20, 2018 at 8:24:06 AM EST

Subject:    John Barton Dies at 89

 

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/theatre/what-to-see/rsc-founder-john-barton-dies-89/

 

18 JANUARY 2018

 

British theatre director John Barton, a co-founder of the Royal Shakespeare Company (RSC), has died aged 89.

 

The RSC’s current artistic director Gregory Doran confirmed the news today, praising Barton as “both a great director and teacher, and simply one of the greatest influences in the acting of Shakespeare of the last century”.

 

Barton’s most acclaimed productions included Aphra Behn’s The Rover in 1986 with Jeremy Irons and Sinead Cusack, a 1969 Twelfth Night with Judi Dench, and the epic Wars of the Roses in 1963, a collaboration with his RSC co-founder Peter Hall which brought together four of Shakespeare’s history plays into a single monumental show.  Barton wrote 1,400 lines of new verse for the production, which were woven into Shakespeare’s dialogue.

 

He became a familiar face in 1982 with the broadcast of Playing Shakespeare on ITV's London Weekend Television, a nine-part series Barton co-presented with Trevor Nunn, which featured some of the most prominent actors of the day, including Ian McKellen, David Suchet and Patrick Stewart.

 

Stewart, writing on Twitter, said: “It is with great sadness I have heard today of John B’s death. But the sadness is overwhelmed by the gratitude, respect and love I had/have for him. No one in my career had the impact that John had and the names William Shakespeare and John Barton will be for me forever united.”

 

[ . . . ]

 

Anne Barton, his wife of more than 40 years, passed away aged 80 in 2013. He is survived by his sister Jennifer.

 

Doran has dedicated his forthcoming production of Shakespeare’s Troilus and Cressida – Barton’s favourite play – to the late director, calling him “a Shakespeare genius, a mentor, and I am proud to say, a friend”.

 

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------

From:        Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         January 23, 2018 at 8:21:10 AM EST

Subject:    John Barton Is Dead at 89

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/01/22/obituaries/john-barton-revelatory-shakespeare-director-is-dead-at-89.html

 

 

John Barton, Revelatory Shakespeare Director, Is Dead at 89

 

By Neil Genzlinger

JAN. 22, 2018

 

John Barton, a director who helped Peter Hall start the Royal Shakespeare Company and was widely regarded as one of the theater world’s foremost interpreters of Shakespeare, died on Thursday in West London. He was 89.

 

Gregory Doran, artistic director of the Royal Shakespeare Company, announced the death, calling Mr. Barton “simply one of the greatest influences in the acting of Shakespeare of the last century.” No cause was given.

 

As a director and in the classes and workshops he taught, Mr. Barton was known for helping actors find the meaning in Shakespeare’s lines.

“There are few absolute rules about playing Shakespeare, but many possibilities,” he said in introducing “Playing Shakespeare,” a series of nine workshops recorded in 1982 by British television that are still regarded as among the definitive resources for Shakespearean actors. In 1984, he turned the workshops into a book, “Playing Shakespeare: An Actor’s Guide.”

 

Although Mr. Barton revered Shakespeare’s works and other classic plays, he was not afraid to experiment with them. He once rewrote “King John,” splicing in lines from other sources, including himself.

 

In 1963, working with Mr. Hall (who died in September), he condensed Shakespeare’s three “Henry VI” plays and “Richard III” and staged them under the title “The Wars of the Roses” at Stratford-upon-Avon. The production, a hit, put the fledgling Royal Shakespeare Company on the map.

 

John Bernard Adie Barton was born on Nov. 26, 1928, in London. His father, Harold, was an accountant; his mother was the former Joyce Wale. He was educated at Eton College and at King’s College, Cambridge, where he directed numerous student productions and, after graduating, became a fellow and lay dean. There he also met Mr. Hall, who was three years younger.

 

By the end of the 1950s, Mr. Hall had begun to garner considerable attention as a director and had taken over the Shakespeare Memorial Theater at Stratford with ambitious plans. When he founded the Royal Shakespeare Company in 1961, he asked Mr. Barton to help him get the troupe off the ground. Mr. Barton would go on to direct more than 50 productions there.

 

Mr. Doran cited his 1969 “Twelfth Night” (with a cast that included Judi Dench as Viola and Donald Sinden as Malvolio), his 1976 “Much Ado About Nothing” and his 1978 “Love’s Labour’s Lost” as among the most memorable.

 

Mr. Barton was also a writer and adapter. Among his most enduring creations was “The Hollow Crown,” a sort of sampler of British monarchs, which after its premiere by the Royal Shakespeare Company in 1961 had a run on Broadway in 1963, with Mr. Barton in the cast. Howard Taubman, writing in The New York Times, called it “an ingratiating entertainment of immense theatrical flare.” The company revived it as recently as 2005.

Mr. Barton, though, did not limit himself to Shakespeare or British themes. Among his most ambitious projects was “The Greeks,” a nine-hour production spread over three evenings that adapted 10 plays by Euripides, Aeschylus, Sophocles and Homer to tell the story of the Trojan War.

 

“I love the contradictions,” Mr. Barton told The Times, describing his fascination with the subject matter. “Apollo is the god of reason and unreason. Clytemnestra turns from the loving wife into the husband-killer. The contradictions give the cycle a certain coherence of life.”

 

He defended the mash-up of various texts.

 

“Some people will be horrified,” he said, “but I don’t think we’ve twisted the spirit of the plays. I hate the clichés of updating the classics. Helen doesn’t wear sunglasses. But she can anoint herself with modern suntan lotion, because the Greeks anointed themselves with oil.”

 

Mr. Barton married Anne Righter in 1969. She died in 2013. The company’s announcement listed no survivors.

 

In a foreword to Mr. Barton’s “Playing Shakespeare” book, Trevor Nunn, who became artistic director of the Royal Shakespeare Company in 1968, recalled Mr. Barton’s reputation in the early 1960s: “hilariously absent-minded, obsessed with cricket, a chain smoker, an expert on Napoleon and somebody who enjoyed working 16 hours a day without a break.”

 

Then, Mr. Nunn continued, he had a chance to work closely with Mr. Barton on a production of “Henry V.” “For six weeks of the rehearsal period,” Mr. Nunn wrote, “I became the world expert on John’s absent-mindedness, I came to love the 16-hour day (I was already O.K. on cricket and Napoleon), and I learned more about unlocking a Shakespeare text than any scholarship could have taught me.”

 

 

 

CFP: Scenes in the Other’s Language (UGA, Nov 1-3, 2018)

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 29.008  Thursday, 18 January 2018

 

From:        Sujata Iyengar <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:         Wednesday, January 17, 2018 at 9:00 AM
Subject:     CFP: Scenes in the Other’s Language (UGA, Nov 1-3, 2018)

Call for Papers: Scenes in the Other’s Language/Scènes dans la langue de l’autre (November 1-3, 2018; Abstracts due March 15, 2018)

 

The University of Georgia (UGA) and the Université Paul-Valéry Montpellier 3 (UPVM) and IRCL (UMR5186 CNRS) are delighted to announce a conference, “Scenes in the Other’s Language/Scènes dans la langue de l’autre,” as part of their new collaboration, “Scene-Stealing/Ravir la scène,” sponsored by UGA, UPVM, CNRS, the Partner University Fund, and the FACE Foundation. This conference is organized in the wake of the exploratory day that took place in Montpellier in October 2017 and in association with the a2ru inter-arts conference that will be held at the University of Georgia in November 2018.

 

Dates: November 1-3, 2018

 

Location: University of Georgia Special Collections Libraries, Athens, Georgia, USA, 30602, and other locations around the University of Georgia and downtown Athens, Georgia

Activities: Planned conference activities include seminars, paper sessions, plenary lectures, and a poster session for undergraduate research. Delegates will also have the opportunity to attend a UGA Theatre Department immersive multimedia production, “The Rosetta Theatre Project”; a roundtable discussion about “Shakespeare’s Magical Language: Gloria Naylor’s Mama Day and the Languages of the Barrier Islands” with students and faculty from Linguistics and African American Studies; and some film screenings.

 

Call: We solicit seminar and panel papers from faculty and graduate students in English, French, Theatre, Film Studies, Linguistics, and other related disciplines on the topic of multilingual scenes in French and English   drama from the Renaissance through the Enlightenment. We define such “scenes” as sequences of dialogue in which a noticeable proportion of lines appear in a language that is not the dominant language of the rest of the play or in which on-stage characters identify a particular sequence as belonging to another language or as constituting jargon or an argot. Such scenes appear in, for example, Shakespeare’s Henry V, 1 Henry IV, Love’s Labour’s Lost, The Taming of the Shrew, Merry Wives of Windsor, and All’s Well That Ends Well; Molière’s Monsieur de Pourceaugnac; Lodge’s Wounds of Civil War; Bonnet’s Le Jugement de Paris; Marston’s Antonio and Mellida and Antonio’s Revenge; Baudeau de Somize’s Les Véritables Précieuses; Jonson’s Poetaster and  The Case is Altered; Greene’s James IV; Heywood’s If You Know Not Me, You Know Nobody, Part 2; Brécourt’s L’Ombre de Molière; Dekker’s The Shoemaker’s Holiday; Haughton’s Englishmen for my Money; Kyd and Middleton’s The Spanish Tragedy; and many more.

 

We invite individuals or groups of scholars to share different perspectives on the same scene and encourage interdisciplinary collaboration and exchange. Topics might include: theatrical or cinematic histories of well-known scenes of translation or language-learning in Shakespearean drama; scenes of Latin and French in English plays and of Latin and English in French plays; the identification and representation of signed languages in early modern English and French drama; scenes of polyglossia (translated or untranslated); scenes including or discussing language minorities or regional languages within a nation; investigations of the translation of multilingual scenes when the surrounding play is itself translated into another language; editorial decisions surrounding the “correction” of language errors in scenes or sequences in another language. We also encourage potential contributors to consider deeply the theoretical concerns raised by the term “the other” in the context of language use and to keep in mind not only historical philosophies of otherness such as those delineated by Husserl, de Beauvoir, and Levinas but also present-day perspectives on otherness from contemporary race   studies (in the US and in France), postcolonialism, disabilities studies, gender and sexuality studies, whiteness studies, and other frameworks.

 

We invite contributions in both French and English, although we will ask French-language authors to be willing to make an English translation of their work available at the conference.

 

Please send by March 15, 2018 the following:

  1. 250-word abstract for 20-minute conference papers or for performances of various lengths, or a 200- word abstract for a manuscript to be circulated in a seminar or for an undergraduate research poster
  2. 3-5 sentence biography
  3. a brief sentence clarifying whether you would prefer to participate in a seminar, to lead a seminar, to deliver a paper, to offer a performance, or to present a poster.

Send all materials to Sujata Iyengar (iyengar[at]uga.edu) and Christy Desmet (cdesmet[at]uga.edu). The conference committee comprises representatives from both UGA and UPVM from English, French, Theatre, and related departments. We hope to let all applicants know the status of their conference submissions by the end of April 2018.

 

Selected papers on early modern French and English drama will be eligible for publication in the peer-reviewed multimedia online journal Scene Focus/Arrêt sur Scène; selected papers on Shakespearean scenes and their adaptations will be eligible for publication in the peer-reviewed multimedia online journal Borrowers and Lenders: The Journal of Shakespeare and Appropriation.

 

 

 

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