July

Re: Michael Boyd and the Future of the RSC

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.1723  Tuesday, 30 July 2002

[1]     From:   Janet Costa <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 29 Jul 2002 08:34:27 -0700 (PDT)
        Subj:   Re: Michael Boyd and the Future of the RSC

[2]     From:   Jan Pick <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 29 Jul 2002 21:37:06 +0100
        Subj:   Re: Michael Boyd and the Future of the RSC


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Janet Costa <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 29 Jul 2002 08:34:27 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: 13.1712 Re: Michael Boyd and the Future of the RSC
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.1712 Re: Michael Boyd and the Future of the RSC

Re: Brian Willis : "the fact that Lord Olivier and so many good actors
performed there."

Brian: There's always the option of doing what the Grand Ole Opry did
and save a piece of the floorboards for the new construction, a sort of
relic retention. They don't need the whole building for that.

From my directors' point of view, I agree that the RST should be
demolished. It's a miserable playing space, and an even more miserable
viewing space. I think that audiences may have changed in one respect.
The visual aspects of theatre have been heightened in the last 40 or 50
years.  While I do not agree with spectacle for the sake of spectacle, I
think much more could be done with that space. Barrie Rutter has done
wonders with Northern Broadsides at the Dean Clough Mill, and with a lot
less money.  There's no reason that I can see that the RSC can't be as
resourceful, inventive and successful with its newfound resources. If
they had to put on productions for under a 1000 pounds, I'll bet they
could do it...

Janet

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jan Pick <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 29 Jul 2002 21:37:06 +0100
Subject: 13.1712 Re: Michael Boyd and the Future of the RSC
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.1712 Re: Michael Boyd and the Future of the RSC

Why so keen to destroy the RST?  My teenagers just love the whole space
- and they spent most of the Boyd 'Dream' Summer standing at the back
with no problems.  It will take years to replace the RST and millions,
why not adapt the current space?  It is a sad fact that a lot of
'trendy' directors say that they can put on a show anywhere - shed,
docks, factories etc so why not in a theatre?  With The Other Place
closed, if the RST is demolished that would leaves the Swan - hardly
adequate.  There are too few big theatres left - OK Dommar, Almeida etc,
very exciting for the 2.3 people who can get in to see the productions!
Get Terry Hands to advise.  It is the chicken-hearted directors who are
scared of that space, not the actors - not real actors anyway.  Let's
keep the RST and bring it back into being the very exciting space it
used to be in the '70s when I was a teenager and being wowed by the
productions there!

Jan Pick

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Re: Jacques Pronunciations

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.1722  Tuesday, 30 July 2002

[1]     From:   Richard Kennedy <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 29 Jul 2002 07:34:56 -0700
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.1713 Jacques Pronunciations

[2]     From:   Marko Begovic <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 29 Jul 2002 11:46:58 -0400
        Subj:   Jacques Pronunciations

[3]     From:   H. David Friedberg <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 29 Jul 2002 13:56:58 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.1713 Jacques Pronunciations

[4]     From:   Jan Pick <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 29 Jul 2002 21:38:54 +0100
        Subj:   Re: SHK 13.1713 Jacques Pronunciations


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Richard Kennedy <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 29 Jul 2002 07:34:56 -0700
Subject: 13.1713 Jacques Pronunciations
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.1713 Jacques Pronunciations

You might call one of them Jacque, and the other John, or maybe Jake.

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Marko Begovic <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 29 Jul 2002 11:46:58 -0400
Subject:        Jacques Pronunciations

I attended a few weeks ago The Cleveland Shakespeare Festival where As
You Like It was performed.  They used "Jay-Kweez" for the first Jacques
and "zhahk" for Jacques de Boys.

I hope this helps

Marko Begovic

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           H. David Friedberg <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 29 Jul 2002 13:56:58 -0400
Subject: 13.1713 Jacques Pronunciations
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.1713 Jacques Pronunciations

>I am in the midst of planning for a production of As You Like It, and am
>caught up in the age old problem - pronunciation of the name.  With two
>Jacques, this becomes even more problematic.  Kokeritz argues for
>"Jakes" and the disyllabic "Jake-is" and claims there is no authority
>for the pronunciation: "Jay-kweez" which Colaianni supports.

Always willing to jump in where angels fear to pronounce

I was taught that Jaques is from " the Metamorphosis of Ajax"  by
Harington, the inventor of the water closet ( NO it wasn't Thomas
Crapper)  to A Jakes, whence Jakes means a privy

Jacques is I think Zhahk

H. David Friedberg

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jan Pick <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 29 Jul 2002 21:38:54 +0100
Subject: 13.1713 Jacques Pronunciations
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.1713 Jacques Pronunciations

According to John Barton speaking about Troilus and Cressida, the
pronunciation of a name changes to match the rhythm of the line - it is
OK to use different ones within the same production.

Jan Pick

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Smoke Gets in Your Eyes

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.1720  Monday, 29 July 2002

From:           Mike Jensen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Sunday, 28 Jul 2002 07:36:31 -0700
Subject:        Smoke Gets in Your Eyes

For those who collect such moments: I write from Ashland, Oregon, where
I just saw the Oregon Shakespeare Festival's almost excellent production
of *Titus Andronicus*.

A forest fire continues to rage several miles away, creating a canopy of
smoke for many miles around.  Smoke has been on constant view overhead,
has obscured the views if the surrounding mountains, and has been a
constant smell in the air for the past two days.

The performance of *Titus* came, as it should, to Lucius's line

  Whose smoke like incense doth perfume the sky.

The way these stories are supposed to end is with the statement that the
actor made it clear that he meant the smoke in the Ashland sky, and the
audience gave a hardy laugh.  Not so.  I heard only myself chuckle in
recognition.

I want to thank the mighty Cydne for typing this since my finger is in a
splint.

All the best,
Mike Jensen

_______________________________________________________________
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opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Biographical Index of English Drama Before 1660

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.1721  Monday, 29 July 2002

From:           David Kathman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Sunday, 28 Jul 2002 21:12:56 -0600
Subject:        Biographical Index of English Drama Before 1660

As I mentioned in a posting last week, I have been working to update my
Biographical Index of Elizabethan Theater, now rechristened the
Biographical Index of English Drama Before 1660.  The new version is now
online, at

http://shakespeareauthorship.com/bd/

As before, the Index includes actors, playwrights, patrons, and various
other people connected with dramatic activity in the pre-Restoration
period, roughly 2900 different people in all.  Entries contain basic
biographical information, including a description of the person's
connection to the drama, plus a chronological list of references to
published biographical information about him (or her).  The main
differences from the old version are that the Index now includes:

* People active before 1558, going back to the Middle Ages;
* People active between 1642 and 1660, a period largely neglected by
most theater historians despite its rich dramatic activity;
* All actors in academic plays at Oxford and Cambridge, who were only
partially indexed before;
* All known performers in court masques between 1604 and 1640;
* All known musicians in professional playhouses as well as in court
masques and entertainments, who were only partially indexed before;
* A greater number of employees of the Revels office, especially from
the early Tudor period;
* A greater number of contemporary critics of the theatre, both positive
(e.g. Francis Meres) and negative (e.g. William Prynne), plus more
miscellaneous other people important important for theatre history who
do not fall into any of the other categories.

While I have tried to be as thorough as possible in indexing those who
made their living in the theatre, the Index now includes many more
people whose connection to drama was more peripheral.  I think this is a
good thing, since such connections can be illuminating for attempts to
put dramatic activity in a larger context.  It is useful and interesting
to know, for example, that Cardinal Wolsey patronized a playing company,
that magician John Dee directed a comedy at Cambridge, that the composer
John Dowland and his son Robert both performed in masques and
entertainments, or that Thomas Howard, 1st Earl of Suffolk and Lord
Chamberlain between 1603 and 1610, had eight children who danced in
Jacobean court masques.

This index is a prolegomenon to a more ambitious work, namely a
Biographical Dictionary of English Drama Before 1660.  That work will
flesh out the index entries with narrative biographies for each person,
along with further details such as exact birth and death dates,
education and apprenticeships, and lists of works by playwrights.  The
Index is still very much a work in progress, and I know for a fact that
there are lacunae.  I have made it available to the online scholarly
community so that scholars can use the information it contains without
having to wait for the full Dictionary; however, I also hope that those
using the Index will inform me of any errors or omissions, so that the
final product can be as accurate and complete as possible.  I also
welcome any suggestions for how it can be improved, including
information that people would specifically like to see included.

Thanks,
Dave Kathman
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DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

The Summer's Tale Moieties

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 13.1719  Monday, 29 July 2002

From:           Graham Hall <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Sunday, 28 Jul 2002 09:54:51 +0000
Subject:        The Summer's Tale Moieties

Currently the Oxbridge Shakespeare summer season flows along in the
Fellows' gardens awash with Pimms No1 here in this sceptered isle.
Ticket prices (up on average 16% on last year) are the inverse ratio of
performance lengths and quality is as indeterminate as width. Company
size is leaner than most that toured in the plague years. Plots are
slashed, text mutilated and actors triple and quadruple those characters
that remain.

Can any SHAKSPEReans offer a guide as to the point where a PLAY BY
SHAKESPEARE transmogrifies into a PLAY VAGUELY ASSOCIATED WITH ONE THAT
SHAKESPEARE WROTE as I have a marvellous disposition to visit HM's
Trading Standards Officer?

Best wishes,
Graham Hall.

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

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