2000

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.2106  Thursday, 16 November 2000.

From:           Sean Lawrence <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 15 Nov 2000 08:58:51 -0800
Subject:        Latest EMLS

Early Modern Literary Studies is pleased to announce the appearance of
its September 2000 issue, which can be found at
http://purl.oclc.org/emls/emlshome.html .

The table of contents appears below.

The journal continues to welcome articles, notes, reviews and theatre
reviewers.  Articles and notes should be sent to the Editor, Dr Lisa
Hopkins, either by post at School of Cultural Studies, Sheffield Hallam
University, Collegiate Crescent Campus, Sheffield, S10 2BP, U.K., or by
electronic mail at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.; offers of book reviews to the
Reviews Editor, Dr James Doelman (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.); and offers of
theatre reviews to the theatre reviews editor, Dr Roberta Barker
(This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.).

The next issue, due to be published in January 2001, will be a special
issue on early modern women's writing.

Articles:

Cheerful Girls and Willing Boys: Old and young bodies in Shakespeare's
Sonnets.
Ian MacInnes, Albion College.

"To stand upright will ask thee skill": The Pinnacle and the Paradigm.
Carol Barton, Averett College.

The Healthy Body: Desire and Sustenance in John Lyly's Love's
Metamorphosis.
Mark Dooley, University of Teesside.

Jonson's Romish Foxe: Anti-Catholic Discourse in Volpone.
Alizon Brunning, University of Central Lancashire.

"Subjected thus": Plague and Panopticism in Richard II.
Nick Cox, Leeds Metropolitan University.

Notes:

Revision of scene 4 of Sir Thomas More as a test of New Bibliographical
principles.
Gabriel Egan, De Montfort University.

"Unaccommodated man" and his discontents in King Lear: Edmund the
Bastard and interrogative puns.
Anthony Gilbert, Lancaster University.

There is also the usual complement of reviews and theatre reviews.

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